Arvilla J. Anderson

13 Nov 1906 - 5 Oct 1986

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Arvilla J. Anderson

13 Nov 1906 - 5 Oct 1986
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Grave site information of Arvilla J. Anderson (13 Nov 1906 - 5 Oct 1986) at Barnwell Cemetery in Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta, Canada from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Arvilla J. Anderson

Nasceu:
Morreu:

Barnwell Cemetery

Township Road 95
Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta
Canada

Epitáfio

In loving memory
Copista

Paddle

October 30, 2013
Fotógrafo

Reni4bz

September 28, 2013

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Myrl Johnson's Childhood Memories

Colaborador: Paddle Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Talking about the birth of her younger brother, Myrl writes: Sheldon was born in this little house 27 July 1904. And we were so happy to have a brother. I can remember how all the family made such a fuss over him. In the same little house in Raymond on the 13 of November 1906 Arvilla was born. It was a cold stormy night. The snow was falling and the wind was howling hard. We were thrilled to have a baby sister. She was so cute and fat. In a few years the grandparents on both sides of the family came to Canada, Grandma Allred and the rest of her family stayed with us and Grandpa and Grandma Johnson lived in a house on the lot just north of us. It was good to have them all so close by. I started school in September 1906. I was always so bashful I dreaded going alone. We lived about three blocks from the school and mother would have to walk up with me almost every morning, but a year later when Armrel started everything was all right. Mother always dressed us both alike and everyone asked if we were twins. In 1908 father took up a homestead in Barnwell and in 1909 we moved down here to live. Grandma Allred bought a home in Raymond and stayed there with the rest of her family, Milford, Myrtle and Cyril. The house in Barnwell had three rooms and it was very nice. The prairie around us was big and bare of trees but covered with long grass. We could see for miles in all directions but it was home and we loved it. When you grow up with the sun and the wind and the space of the prairies, something of their freshness and freedom stays with you always. Wind! Wind! There always seemed to be wind on the prairies. The feel, sound and smell of it, are embedded in my childhood memories. We came in the spring and signs of new life were everywhere: young colts, calves, chickens and pigs and green grain. Cora was born that first spring 24 March 1909. She was so little and cute. That made four girls and one boy in the family then. I loved the bright sunny days. The birds that sang and the gophers that seemed to be everywhere. There were lots of wild animals then. The trains were something we hadn't seen before but now we watched them from the Eastern horizon. To the west, a long string of Hack cars and the smoke trailing far into the sky. We didn't go to school the first two years after we came here as we didn't like to walk so far alone. It was a little over two miles away but after we started we didn't mind the walk at all. But we looked forward to the summer holidays. On the 29 May 1911 Frank was born in Raymond. Mother went over and stayed a month with Grandma Allred. The school house was used for church and parties, so it was a very important place to all of us. Grandpa and Grandma Johnson took a homestead here (in Barnwell) and moved down just before we did, and he had the post office and the only little store for a while. Later he sold it all and moved onto another piece of land. A corner of my heart treasures an affection for that little country store as it was more than a store but a place for friends to meet and visit. There were no telephones then. I remember the summer winds, hot and dry, holding both the threat of hail and the promise of rain. It seemed like we always needed rain. Long days with the added delight of picnics, baseball and summer sports, and the great rolling prairies of ripening grain. And then there were the hard times and bad days, dust storms that could turn the world grey or sombre black and drive men and animals for shelter and cause lines of worry in my fathers face.

Myrl Johnson - Early Marriage and Motherhood

Colaborador: Paddle Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

As written by Myrl in her memoir: Melvin was born in this house on his father's birthday, the 31st of October 1919. It was very cold and the snow was about a foot deep. It stayed very cold all winter. Melvin was a healthy baby and got along fine. Grandma Allred came and stayed with us when he was born. Mother and Dad still lived at the old farm and I longed to go back. We spent most of our Sundays there. In 1919 Garth was born, 21 July. He had dark hair and brown eyes and was a great little fellow. Then on the 9th of January 1921 Gerald was born. He had blue eyes and blonde curly hair and had such winning ways. On the 2nd of April 1923 Marie was born, blue eyes and dark hair and so cute. Grandma Allred lived there with the folks then and Marie being the last baby they all enjoyed her so much. Grandma made quilts and rugs and did a lot of hand work. She had her own little house by the side of the folks but ate her meals with them. We only lived about three and a half miles from them but I sure loved to go home and be with them on the farm. In February 1920 we bought 60 acres of the quarter of land that Irvin had, and we moved to a little one roomed house down by the side of Irvin and Edith, and stayed there that summer. Hillman went out to work and Irvin stayed home and put in all the crops for both of us, and then we divided everything even. The crop was all up nice and green when the winds started to blow. It blew so hard and so many days that the crops were either buried with sand or blown out and the air was so full of dust it was hard to see anywhere. Some of the machinery and lots of the fences were buried up too. After about three weeks the wind stopped blowing. Some of the grain came up again and we had fair crops. There were not trees in the country then but ditches were being built that summer and we were all looking forward to having trees and gardens as well as other crops. We would pack up a lunch and get in our buggy's and go to the river for a picnic as that was the only place where there were any trees and water. We picked lots of berries there too. We tied branches on our buggy's to decorate them. We had Snap on our buggy on this side and Clarence had Black Prince on his buggy. The prairie was big and flat with only the telephone lines and fences and a few farm homes to see. We made the best of everything and had lots of good times together. The first home we owned was the fourth house that we had lived in after we were married and is on the sixty acres of land we bought. We moved into it the fall of 1920 and the next spring we planted trees all around, some of which we dug up at the river. The next summer on the 29th of July, 1921, Phyllis was born there. Mother came and stayed with me for a while. Phyllis had blonde hair and blue eyes and was a healthy baby and grew good and was so cute and we loved her so much. The trees grew very fast as we had the irrigation now and could water all we needed to. We had good gardens and lots of flowers and a lawn and Melvin and Phyllis played good together. Melvin always took good care of Phyllis and didn't let her get very far away. When he started to school he had to walk a half a mile alone and he didn't like to go alone very well. After Phyllis started school they didn't make any fuss about going at all. On December 12, 1923 we got on the train and went to Cardston to go to the temple. On December 13, 1923 we went through for the first time and were sealed for time and eternity. Melvin and Phyllis were sealed to us at that time. We stayed over night and came home on the train the next day. We didn't have any cars in those days, but they were very happy days. We worked hard planting our little farm and fixing our house and planting trees and flowers and a garden. Irrigation had just come to us and it was really wonderful to have water, all we could use. This was the first time we could have trees and a lawn around the house and we thought we couldn't get too many trees, so we planted them everywhere and later had to dig some up, but it was good to have lots of shade for the children to play in. Melvin and Phyllis were happy children and played well together. We enjoyed having our family come to visit. We didn't have any electricity so we used the old fashioned lamps to light our home. As the years passed by we were happy in our little farm. In the fall of 1925 Kenneth was born, 22nd of November. Kenneth was born in the old home on Dad's farm. All the family was there and wanted him named Kenneth. Grandma Allred was there too and she wanted him named Park, so we called him Kenneth Park Anderson, and we always liked it. Ken was born on Sunday and the following week the threshers pulled on to our place and threshed our crop. It had rained so much all fall we couldn't get it done any sooner. The following winter was cold and we had lots of sickness. There was measles and mumps and chicken pox and whooping cough around the community. Melvin and Phyllis in school they got them all and so Ken had them when he was so young, but with constant care and watching he got through it all. As spring came and the days turned sunny and warm again, health returned to our family and all was well with us again. In April we bought our first car, a Ford. When Kenneth was nine months old he started walking. He never was satisfied to walk, he always ran and got lots of bumps. We had a cupboard in our kitchen with wide shelves in the bottom and a curtain across the front and Kenneth would crawl up in there and play with all the pans and lids. In the Spring of 1929 section 29 was divided up in to small plots of from 10 to 20 acres, so we bought 15 acres there so we could be closer to school and church. In the fall of 1929 we moved. Ken was four years old when we moved so won't remember much about it. It was an old house so took a lot of fixing, but we were thrilled to have it to work on. We had so many plans for our home and family. Two years later Marlin was born in this house, 8th December 1931. Uncle Marlin Allred from Arizona was staying with us then for a visit so we named Marlin after him. He was so pleased he bought him a whole new outfit of clothes. We enjoyed the new baby and Uncle Marlin stayed for a few weeks and helped me take care of him. Ken was six years old when Marlin was born so we enjoyed having another baby in the home. He was a healthy, happy baby and grew up so fast and when he was three years old Dennis was born, 8th October 1934. So we had two little boys together and we enjoyed them so much. When Dennis was one year old his father became ill with Brights disease and was sick most of the time. So in the fall we went to Arizona and California to see if the warmer climate would help him. We went with my Mother and Dad and Grandma Johnson and Florence and we took Dennis with us. Arvilla and Ivan took care of Melvin and Phyllis and Ken and Marlin. We wanted to take them but there wasn't room. We left on the 14 November 1936. Grandma Johnson stayed with her girls in California and Hillman stayed with some of his relatives to take treatments for his health. The rest of us came home. The winter was so long and lonesome. His health didn't improve and on the 13th of March 1937 he came home a very sick man and passed away on 24th of March 1937. After the funeral I stayed with my mother and dad for almost three weeks and they were so good to all of us and all our friends did so much for us. It was so hard to take care of the children away from home so we went back, heartsick and lonely. The children were so good to help and so we started a new life alone. We were buying our home and land, fifteen acres of land, and we had five horses and two cows and some pigs and so we worked thinning beets and different things until our place was paid for. Melvin was seventeen, Phyllis fifteen, Kenneth twelve, Marlin five and Dennis two and half years. When Dennis and Marlin were small I got them a little wagon and when I went to the store or over to Grandma and Grandpa's I would pull them along in the wagon. We finally sold our horses and cows because we didn't have any pasture for them and it was so hard to get feed for them. One winter Mother and Dad and the ones that were home then, came over and stayed with me because I was so lonely. When I think of it now I guess it was hard for them to leave their home to come, but I really enjoyed it. Phyllis and my sister Marie went to school together and enjoyed the winter together. Mother had a heart attack and was very sick. There was no hospital in Taber then, so we took her to Lethbridge. She got better but always had to be so careful after that or it would come back again. They moved back home in the spring and the next winter they went to Arizona and stayed for a couple of months, which they enjoyed very much.

Myrl Johnson's Childhood Memories

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

Talking about the birth of her younger brother, Myrl writes: Sheldon was born in this little house 27 July 1904. And we were so happy to have a brother. I can remember how all the family made such a fuss over him. In the same little house in Raymond on the 13 of November 1906 Arvilla was born. It was a cold stormy night. The snow was falling and the wind was howling hard. We were thrilled to have a baby sister. She was so cute and fat. In a few years the grandparents on both sides of the family came to Canada, Grandma Allred and the rest of her family stayed with us and Grandpa and Grandma Johnson lived in a house on the lot just north of us. It was good to have them all so close by. I started school in September 1906. I was always so bashful I dreaded going alone. We lived about three blocks from the school and mother would have to walk up with me almost every morning, but a year later when Armrel started everything was all right. Mother always dressed us both alike and everyone asked if we were twins. In 1908 father took up a homestead in Barnwell and in 1909 we moved down here to live. Grandma Allred bought a home in Raymond and stayed there with the rest of her family, Milford, Myrtle and Cyril. The house in Barnwell had three rooms and it was very nice. The prairie around us was big and bare of trees but covered with long grass. We could see for miles in all directions but it was home and we loved it. When you grow up with the sun and the wind and the space of the prairies, something of their freshness and freedom stays with you always. Wind! Wind! There always seemed to be wind on the prairies. The feel, sound and smell of it, are embedded in my childhood memories. We came in the spring and signs of new life were everywhere: young colts, calves, chickens and pigs and green grain. Cora was born that first spring 24 March 1909. She was so little and cute. That made four girls and one boy in the family then. I loved the bright sunny days. The birds that sang and the gophers that seemed to be everywhere. There were lots of wild animals then. The trains were something we hadn't seen before but now we watched them from the Eastern horizon. To the west, a long string of Hack cars and the smoke trailing far into the sky. We didn't go to school the first two years after we came here as we didn't like to walk so far alone. It was a little over two miles away but after we started we didn't mind the walk at all. But we looked forward to the summer holidays. On the 29 May 1911 Frank was born in Raymond. Mother went over and stayed a month with Grandma Allred. The school house was used for church and parties, so it was a very important place to all of us. Grandpa and Grandma Johnson took a homestead here (in Barnwell) and moved down just before we did, and he had the post office and the only little store for a while. Later he sold it all and moved onto another piece of land. A corner of my heart treasures an affection for that little country store as it was more than a store but a place for friends to meet and visit. There were no telephones then. I remember the summer winds, hot and dry, holding both the threat of hail and the promise of rain. It seemed like we always needed rain. Long days with the added delight of picnics, baseball and summer sports, and the great rolling prairies of ripening grain. And then there were the hard times and bad days, dust storms that could turn the world grey or sombre black and drive men and animals for shelter and cause lines of worry in my fathers face.

Myrl Johnson - Early Marriage and Motherhood

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

As written by Myrl in her memoir: Melvin was born in this house on his father's birthday, the 31st of October 1919. It was very cold and the snow was about a foot deep. It stayed very cold all winter. Melvin was a healthy baby and got along fine. Grandma Allred came and stayed with us when he was born. Mother and Dad still lived at the old farm and I longed to go back. We spent most of our Sundays there. In 1919 Garth was born, 21 July. He had dark hair and brown eyes and was a great little fellow. Then on the 9th of January 1921 Gerald was born. He had blue eyes and blonde curly hair and had such winning ways. On the 2nd of April 1923 Marie was born, blue eyes and dark hair and so cute. Grandma Allred lived there with the folks then and Marie being the last baby they all enjoyed her so much. Grandma made quilts and rugs and did a lot of hand work. She had her own little house by the side of the folks but ate her meals with them. We only lived about three and a half miles from them but I sure loved to go home and be with them on the farm. In February 1920 we bought 60 acres of the quarter of land that Irvin had, and we moved to a little one roomed house down by the side of Irvin and Edith, and stayed there that summer. Hillman went out to work and Irvin stayed home and put in all the crops for both of us, and then we divided everything even. The crop was all up nice and green when the winds started to blow. It blew so hard and so many days that the crops were either buried with sand or blown out and the air was so full of dust it was hard to see anywhere. Some of the machinery and lots of the fences were buried up too. After about three weeks the wind stopped blowing. Some of the grain came up again and we had fair crops. There were not trees in the country then but ditches were being built that summer and we were all looking forward to having trees and gardens as well as other crops. We would pack up a lunch and get in our buggy's and go to the river for a picnic as that was the only place where there were any trees and water. We picked lots of berries there too. We tied branches on our buggy's to decorate them. We had Snap on our buggy on this side and Clarence had Black Prince on his buggy. The prairie was big and flat with only the telephone lines and fences and a few farm homes to see. We made the best of everything and had lots of good times together. The first home we owned was the fourth house that we had lived in after we were married and is on the sixty acres of land we bought. We moved into it the fall of 1920 and the next spring we planted trees all around, some of which we dug up at the river. The next summer on the 29th of July, 1921, Phyllis was born there. Mother came and stayed with me for a while. Phyllis had blonde hair and blue eyes and was a healthy baby and grew good and was so cute and we loved her so much. The trees grew very fast as we had the irrigation now and could water all we needed to. We had good gardens and lots of flowers and a lawn and Melvin and Phyllis played good together. Melvin always took good care of Phyllis and didn't let her get very far away. When he started to school he had to walk a half a mile alone and he didn't like to go alone very well. After Phyllis started school they didn't make any fuss about going at all. On December 12, 1923 we got on the train and went to Cardston to go to the temple. On December 13, 1923 we went through for the first time and were sealed for time and eternity. Melvin and Phyllis were sealed to us at that time. We stayed over night and came home on the train the next day. We didn't have any cars in those days, but they were very happy days. We worked hard planting our little farm and fixing our house and planting trees and flowers and a garden. Irrigation had just come to us and it was really wonderful to have water, all we could use. This was the first time we could have trees and a lawn around the house and we thought we couldn't get too many trees, so we planted them everywhere and later had to dig some up, but it was good to have lots of shade for the children to play in. Melvin and Phyllis were happy children and played well together. We enjoyed having our family come to visit. We didn't have any electricity so we used the old fashioned lamps to light our home. As the years passed by we were happy in our little farm. In the fall of 1925 Kenneth was born, 22nd of November. Kenneth was born in the old home on Dad's farm. All the family was there and wanted him named Kenneth. Grandma Allred was there too and she wanted him named Park, so we called him Kenneth Park Anderson, and we always liked it. Ken was born on Sunday and the following week the threshers pulled on to our place and threshed our crop. It had rained so much all fall we couldn't get it done any sooner. The following winter was cold and we had lots of sickness. There was measles and mumps and chicken pox and whooping cough around the community. Melvin and Phyllis in school they got them all and so Ken had them when he was so young, but with constant care and watching he got through it all. As spring came and the days turned sunny and warm again, health returned to our family and all was well with us again. In April we bought our first car, a Ford. When Kenneth was nine months old he started walking. He never was satisfied to walk, he always ran and got lots of bumps. We had a cupboard in our kitchen with wide shelves in the bottom and a curtain across the front and Kenneth would crawl up in there and play with all the pans and lids. In the Spring of 1929 section 29 was divided up in to small plots of from 10 to 20 acres, so we bought 15 acres there so we could be closer to school and church. In the fall of 1929 we moved. Ken was four years old when we moved so won't remember much about it. It was an old house so took a lot of fixing, but we were thrilled to have it to work on. We had so many plans for our home and family. Two years later Marlin was born in this house, 8th December 1931. Uncle Marlin Allred from Arizona was staying with us then for a visit so we named Marlin after him. He was so pleased he bought him a whole new outfit of clothes. We enjoyed the new baby and Uncle Marlin stayed for a few weeks and helped me take care of him. Ken was six years old when Marlin was born so we enjoyed having another baby in the home. He was a healthy, happy baby and grew up so fast and when he was three years old Dennis was born, 8th October 1934. So we had two little boys together and we enjoyed them so much. When Dennis was one year old his father became ill with Brights disease and was sick most of the time. So in the fall we went to Arizona and California to see if the warmer climate would help him. We went with my Mother and Dad and Grandma Johnson and Florence and we took Dennis with us. Arvilla and Ivan took care of Melvin and Phyllis and Ken and Marlin. We wanted to take them but there wasn't room. We left on the 14 November 1936. Grandma Johnson stayed with her girls in California and Hillman stayed with some of his relatives to take treatments for his health. The rest of us came home. The winter was so long and lonesome. His health didn't improve and on the 13th of March 1937 he came home a very sick man and passed away on 24th of March 1937. After the funeral I stayed with my mother and dad for almost three weeks and they were so good to all of us and all our friends did so much for us. It was so hard to take care of the children away from home so we went back, heartsick and lonely. The children were so good to help and so we started a new life alone. We were buying our home and land, fifteen acres of land, and we had five horses and two cows and some pigs and so we worked thinning beets and different things until our place was paid for. Melvin was seventeen, Phyllis fifteen, Kenneth twelve, Marlin five and Dennis two and half years. When Dennis and Marlin were small I got them a little wagon and when I went to the store or over to Grandma and Grandpa's I would pull them along in the wagon. We finally sold our horses and cows because we didn't have any pasture for them and it was so hard to get feed for them. One winter Mother and Dad and the ones that were home then, came over and stayed with me because I was so lonely. When I think of it now I guess it was hard for them to leave their home to come, but I really enjoyed it. Phyllis and my sister Marie went to school together and enjoyed the winter together. Mother had a heart attack and was very sick. There was no hospital in Taber then, so we took her to Lethbridge. She got better but always had to be so careful after that or it would come back again. They moved back home in the spring and the next winter they went to Arizona and stayed for a couple of months, which they enjoyed very much.

Life timeline of Arvilla J. Anderson

1906
Arvilla J. Anderson was born on 13 Nov 1906
Arvilla J. Anderson was 5 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Arvilla J. Anderson was 22 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Arvilla J. Anderson was 33 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Arvilla J. Anderson was 39 years old when World War II: Combat ends in the Pacific Theater: The Japanese Instrument of Surrender is signed by Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and accepted aboard the battleship USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. The Pacific War, sometimes called the Asia-Pacific War, was the theater of World War II that was fought in the Pacific and Asia. It was fought over a vast area that included the Pacific Ocean and islands, the South West Pacific, South-East Asia, and in China.
Arvilla J. Anderson was 46 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
Arvilla J. Anderson was 57 years old when John F. Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas, Texas; hours later, Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in aboard Air Force One as the 36th President of the United States. John Fitzgerald Kennedy, commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. He served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his presidency dealt with managing relations with the Soviet Union. As a member of the Democratic Party, Kennedy represented the state of Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate prior to becoming president.
Arvilla J. Anderson was 66 years old when Munich massacre: Nine Israeli athletes die (along with a German policeman) at the hands of the Palestinian "Black September" terrorist group after being taken hostage at the Munich Olympic Games. Two other Israeli athletes were slain in the initial attack the previous day. The Munich massacre was an attack during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, in which the Palestinian terrorist group Black September took eleven Israeli Olympic team members hostage and killed them along with a West German police officer.
Arvilla J. Anderson died on 5 Oct 1986 at the age of 79
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Arvilla J. Anderson (13 Nov 1906 - 5 Oct 1986), BillionGraves Record 5715735 Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta, Canada

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