Dennis Francis Anderson

8 Oct 1934 - 15 Oct 1982

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Dennis Francis Anderson

8 Oct 1934 - 15 Oct 1982
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Grave site information of Dennis Francis Anderson (8 Oct 1934 - 15 Oct 1982) at Barnwell Cemetery in Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta, Canada from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Dennis Francis Anderson

Nasceu:
Morreu:

Barnwell Cemetery

Township Road 95
Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta
Canada

Epitáfio

In loving memory of
Copista

tfinney22

October 25, 2014
Fotógrafo

Reni4bz

September 28, 2013

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Myrl Johnson - Early Marriage and Motherhood

Colaborador: melohnt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

As written by Myrl in her memoir: Melvin was born in this house on his father's birthday, the 31st of October 1919. It was very cold and the snow was about a foot deep. It stayed very cold all winter. Melvin was a healthy baby and got along fine. Grandma Allred came and stayed with us when he was born. Mother and Dad still lived at the old farm and I longed to go back. We spent most of our Sundays there. In 1919 Garth was born, 21 July. He had dark hair and brown eyes and was a great little fellow. Then on the 9th of January 1921 Gerald was born. He had blue eyes and blonde curly hair and had such winning ways. On the 2nd of April 1923 Marie was born, blue eyes and dark hair and so cute. Grandma Allred lived there with the folks then and Marie being the last baby they all enjoyed her so much. Grandma made quilts and rugs and did a lot of hand work. She had her own little house by the side of the folks but ate her meals with them. We only lived about three and a half miles from them but I sure loved to go home and be with them on the farm. In February 1920 we bought 60 acres of the quarter of land that Irvin had, and we moved to a little one roomed house down by the side of Irvin and Edith, and stayed there that summer. Hillman went out to work and Irvin stayed home and put in all the crops for both of us, and then we divided everything even. The crop was all up nice and green when the winds started to blow. It blew so hard and so many days that the crops were either buried with sand or blown out and the air was so full of dust it was hard to see anywhere. Some of the machinery and lots of the fences were buried up too. After about three weeks the wind stopped blowing. Some of the grain came up again and we had fair crops. There were not trees in the country then but ditches were being built that summer and we were all looking forward to having trees and gardens as well as other crops. We would pack up a lunch and get in our buggy's and go to the river for a picnic as that was the only place where there were any trees and water. We picked lots of berries there too. We tied branches on our buggy's to decorate them. We had Snap on our buggy on this side and Clarence had Black Prince on his buggy. The prairie was big and flat with only the telephone lines and fences and a few farm homes to see. We made the best of everything and had lots of good times together. The first home we owned was the fourth house that we had lived in after we were married and is on the sixty acres of land we bought. We moved into it the fall of 1920 and the next spring we planted trees all around, some of which we dug up at the river. The next summer on the 29th of July, 1921, Phyllis was born there. Mother came and stayed with me for a while. Phyllis had blonde hair and blue eyes and was a healthy baby and grew good and was so cute and we loved her so much. The trees grew very fast as we had the irrigation now and could water all we needed to. We had good gardens and lots of flowers and a lawn and Melvin and Phyllis played good together. Melvin always took good care of Phyllis and didn't let her get very far away. When he started to school he had to walk a half a mile alone and he didn't like to go alone very well. After Phyllis started school they didn't make any fuss about going at all. On December 12, 1923 we got on the train and went to Cardston to go to the temple. On December 13, 1923 we went through for the first time and were sealed for time and eternity. Melvin and Phyllis were sealed to us at that time. We stayed over night and came home on the train the next day. We didn't have any cars in those days, but they were very happy days. We worked hard planting our little farm and fixing our house and planting trees and flowers and a garden. Irrigation had just come to us and it was really wonderful to have water, all we could use. This was the first time we could have trees and a lawn around the house and we thought we couldn't get too many trees, so we planted them everywhere and later had to dig some up, but it was good to have lots of shade for the children to play in. Melvin and Phyllis were happy children and played well together. We enjoyed having our family come to visit. We didn't have any electricity so we used the old fashioned lamps to light our home. As the years passed by we were happy in our little farm. In the fall of 1925 Kenneth was born, 22nd of November. Kenneth was born in the old home on Dad's farm. All the family was there and wanted him named Kenneth. Grandma Allred was there too and she wanted him named Park, so we called him Kenneth Park Anderson, and we always liked it. Ken was born on Sunday and the following week the threshers pulled on to our place and threshed our crop. It had rained so much all fall we couldn't get it done any sooner. The following winter was cold and we had lots of sickness. There was measles and mumps and chicken pox and whooping cough around the community. Melvin and Phyllis in school they got them all and so Ken had them when he was so young, but with constant care and watching he got through it all. As spring came and the days turned sunny and warm again, health returned to our family and all was well with us again. In April we bought our first car, a Ford. When Kenneth was nine months old he started walking. He never was satisfied to walk, he always ran and got lots of bumps. We had a cupboard in our kitchen with wide shelves in the bottom and a curtain across the front and Kenneth would crawl up in there and play with all the pans and lids. In the Spring of 1929 section 29 was divided up in to small plots of from 10 to 20 acres, so we bought 15 acres there so we could be closer to school and church. In the fall of 1929 we moved. Ken was four years old when we moved so won't remember much about it. It was an old house so took a lot of fixing, but we were thrilled to have it to work on. We had so many plans for our home and family. Two years later Marlin was born in this house, 8th December 1931. Uncle Marlin Allred from Arizona was staying with us then for a visit so we named Marlin after him. He was so pleased he bought him a whole new outfit of clothes. We enjoyed the new baby and Uncle Marlin stayed for a few weeks and helped me take care of him. Ken was six years old when Marlin was born so we enjoyed having another baby in the home. He was a healthy, happy baby and grew up so fast and when he was three years old Dennis was born, 8th October 1934. So we had two little boys together and we enjoyed them so much. When Dennis was one year old his father became ill with Brights disease and was sick most of the time. So in the fall we went to Arizona and California to see if the warmer climate would help him. We went with my Mother and Dad and Grandma Johnson and Florence and we took Dennis with us. Arvilla and Ivan took care of Melvin and Phyllis and Ken and Marlin. We wanted to take them but there wasn't room. We left on the 14 November 1936. Grandma Johnson stayed with her girls in California and Hillman stayed with some of his relatives to take treatments for his health. The rest of us came home. The winter was so long and lonesome. His health didn't improve and on the 13th of March 1937 he came home a very sick man and passed away on 24th of March 1937. After the funeral I stayed with my mother and dad for almost three weeks and they were so good to all of us and all our friends did so much for us. It was so hard to take care of the children away from home so we went back, heartsick and lonely. The children were so good to help and so we started a new life alone. We were buying our home and land, fifteen acres of land, and we had five horses and two cows and some pigs and so we worked thinning beets and different things until our place was paid for. Melvin was seventeen, Phyllis fifteen, Kenneth twelve, Marlin five and Dennis two and half years. When Dennis and Marlin were small I got them a little wagon and when I went to the store or over to Grandma and Grandpa's I would pull them along in the wagon. We finally sold our horses and cows because we didn't have any pasture for them and it was so hard to get feed for them. One winter Mother and Dad and the ones that were home then, came over and stayed with me because I was so lonely. When I think of it now I guess it was hard for them to leave their home to come, but I really enjoyed it. Phyllis and my sister Marie went to school together and enjoyed the winter together. Mother had a heart attack and was very sick. There was no hospital in Taber then, so we took her to Lethbridge. She got better but always had to be so careful after that or it would come back again. They moved back home in the spring and the next winter they went to Arizona and stayed for a couple of months, which they enjoyed very much.

Dennis Anderson

Colaborador: melohnt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

As written by his mother Myrl Johnson in her memoir: In the year 1957 Dennis worked in Lethbridge at Smith Motors and while there met a beautiful girl Dorothy Karl. On the 21 of February 1958 Dennis and Dorothy were married and made their home at Cranford. Dennis took over the White Rose gas station, which keeps him busy. On the 1st of March 1959 Calvin, a little son was born to them in the hospital at Lethbridge. That same year Melvin was living in Lethbridge and he moved his family back to Barnwell and went into partnership with Dennis in the White Rose gas business and they are still working together in 1962. On the 12 of February 1962 another little son was born to Dennis and Dorothy, his name Carey. He looks so much like Calvin. They are sure beautiful children. Carey was born in the hospital in Lethbridge too.

Marlin Anderson - Short Stories From His Life

Colaborador: melohnt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

As written by Marlin Anderson in 2007: "My father died when I was 5 years old and I have no memory of him as he had been sick for a number of years and was often away from home. One memory I have is coming home from school in the winter with my brother Dennis. Our mother was working at the local grocery store and had banked the coal stove for the day. We were not allowed to touch it. To keep warm we put on our skates and played hockey on the pond close to our home until she came home. Dennis and I were very close growing up. There was less than 3 years between us in age. My fondest memory of growing up is the way my mother help the family together after my father died. She was only 37 and had no training but was able to provide for her 5 children and raise us in the church. She has always been a great inspiration in my life." Marlin played forward and was point guard for the basketball team the last year he was in school. They were the Barnwell Wolves and he was #7. He played 3 years for the team. The school had no gym so all practice and games were in the church cultural hall. Raymond was always a close rival. Marlin has always loved basketball and coached his three boys in Junior High and High School. He coached the High School girl's team the year before his daughter played. While teaching in Junior High he coached the girls' team to a championship. Marlin had 1 year at Calgary Tech and took a farm mechanics course. He also played on the Tech basketball team. At the age of 40 Marlin went to the University of Lethbridge and got a Bachelors of Education degree in less than three years. Teaching allowed him the opportunity to work with the youth. There was no partying. He was the Bishop, a father, and was teaching early morning seminary. Every morning after seminary he had a 35 minute drive to university. Marlin served a mission in Denmark for two and a half years, from December 1953 to June 1956. He learned Danish after arriving in the mission field. Marlin writes, "my first companion was an elderly man who spoke Danish and was a great help in learning the language." Marlin had many wonderful experiences, especially serving twice as branch president and concluding his mission serving as a district president. At that time the church was operated by the mission. One elderly lady Marlin baptized invited others into her home and they also joined. Marlin writes, "after my mission in Denmark I was released by the mission president. Four other missionaries and myself then rented a car and spent 30 days touring continental Europe and then 7 days in England. It was a wonderful experience." Many years later, Marlin writes, "I can still speak some Danish. A Danish family moved into our area and I had their oldest daughter in school and I practiced my Danish while I taught her English. After they moved back my wife and I visited them twice in Denmark." Asking about his wife Joan, Marlin responded, "I met my wife in the spring of 1960 at a friend's wedding. I was impressed. We had our first date on July 1st and were married on August 24th. I was 28. We went on a honeymoon to Banff and Jasper. We will have been married for 47 years this August." (written in 2007) Marlin graduated from the University of Lethbridge in May 1975. His first job was as the principle of a small country school. Marlin's wife Joan taught grades 4 through 6. It was a great experience with wonderful parental support. The community school Christmas concerts and other activities were great fun. Marlin then taught junior high for 18 years. He retired in 1993. When asked in 2007 about his cars, Marlin answered, "I've owned (bought) 102 cars, counting ones I've bought for my kids. My favorite car was probably the 1960 red chevrolet convertible I had when I got married. I've owned many different makes but have always wanted to have a new Mercedes S500. I've been wondering why I love cars myself for 40 years!" Marlin explains why he loves golf: "I've been playing golf for over 30 years. Golf is a great sport. The courses are beautiful, it is good exercise and I enjoy the association of the family and friend I play with. For many years a group of friends and our wives played a tournament in Kalispell, Montana. We played for a trophy that I bought and the winner had his name engraved on it and kept it for a year until the next tournament. I've always loved playing with my three sons." Marlin writes about serving in the church: "I was Bishop of the Barnwell Ward from September 1967 to September 1974. (7 years) I also served on the Taber Stake Young Men's Presidency and on the Taber Stake High Council. For 9 and a half years I was the first councillor in the Taber Stake Presidency. A favorite calling was the many years I spent teaching the Gospel Doctrine class. My wife and I also enjoyed the years we served as ordinance workers in the Cardston Alberta Temple." Marlin writes about music: "I have always loved good music and been touched by it and the spirituality it can bring into your life. I have had lessons given to my own children, especially my daughter Karen, and have encouraged my grandchildren in their music. I appreciate the hard work and achievements of our family in piano, violin, harp and many instruments played in school bands. My favorite song is O Divine Redeemer, especially when my granddaughter Kristy sings it." Marlin tells about his 2nd mission: "My second mission, served with my wife, was from November 1994 to December 1995. Our youngest son Thomas was also serving a mission at the same time. We served in the Dallas Texas Mission. The Lord expects us to serve and our proselyting mission was a wonderful experience. We helped establish a branch in Palestine, Texas and had the unique opportunity of visiting LDS boys in four federal prisons. The many experiences and service in church callings always adds to ones effectiveness as a missionary. The conversions and friendships are made forever." Advice from Marlin: "My advice to my posterity would be to stay close to the Lord, live the Gospel, and keep His commandments. I would like to be remembered as a man who loved his wife and his family."

Myrl Johnson - Early Marriage and Motherhood

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

As written by Myrl in her memoir: Melvin was born in this house on his father's birthday, the 31st of October 1919. It was very cold and the snow was about a foot deep. It stayed very cold all winter. Melvin was a healthy baby and got along fine. Grandma Allred came and stayed with us when he was born. Mother and Dad still lived at the old farm and I longed to go back. We spent most of our Sundays there. In 1919 Garth was born, 21 July. He had dark hair and brown eyes and was a great little fellow. Then on the 9th of January 1921 Gerald was born. He had blue eyes and blonde curly hair and had such winning ways. On the 2nd of April 1923 Marie was born, blue eyes and dark hair and so cute. Grandma Allred lived there with the folks then and Marie being the last baby they all enjoyed her so much. Grandma made quilts and rugs and did a lot of hand work. She had her own little house by the side of the folks but ate her meals with them. We only lived about three and a half miles from them but I sure loved to go home and be with them on the farm. In February 1920 we bought 60 acres of the quarter of land that Irvin had, and we moved to a little one roomed house down by the side of Irvin and Edith, and stayed there that summer. Hillman went out to work and Irvin stayed home and put in all the crops for both of us, and then we divided everything even. The crop was all up nice and green when the winds started to blow. It blew so hard and so many days that the crops were either buried with sand or blown out and the air was so full of dust it was hard to see anywhere. Some of the machinery and lots of the fences were buried up too. After about three weeks the wind stopped blowing. Some of the grain came up again and we had fair crops. There were not trees in the country then but ditches were being built that summer and we were all looking forward to having trees and gardens as well as other crops. We would pack up a lunch and get in our buggy's and go to the river for a picnic as that was the only place where there were any trees and water. We picked lots of berries there too. We tied branches on our buggy's to decorate them. We had Snap on our buggy on this side and Clarence had Black Prince on his buggy. The prairie was big and flat with only the telephone lines and fences and a few farm homes to see. We made the best of everything and had lots of good times together. The first home we owned was the fourth house that we had lived in after we were married and is on the sixty acres of land we bought. We moved into it the fall of 1920 and the next spring we planted trees all around, some of which we dug up at the river. The next summer on the 29th of July, 1921, Phyllis was born there. Mother came and stayed with me for a while. Phyllis had blonde hair and blue eyes and was a healthy baby and grew good and was so cute and we loved her so much. The trees grew very fast as we had the irrigation now and could water all we needed to. We had good gardens and lots of flowers and a lawn and Melvin and Phyllis played good together. Melvin always took good care of Phyllis and didn't let her get very far away. When he started to school he had to walk a half a mile alone and he didn't like to go alone very well. After Phyllis started school they didn't make any fuss about going at all. On December 12, 1923 we got on the train and went to Cardston to go to the temple. On December 13, 1923 we went through for the first time and were sealed for time and eternity. Melvin and Phyllis were sealed to us at that time. We stayed over night and came home on the train the next day. We didn't have any cars in those days, but they were very happy days. We worked hard planting our little farm and fixing our house and planting trees and flowers and a garden. Irrigation had just come to us and it was really wonderful to have water, all we could use. This was the first time we could have trees and a lawn around the house and we thought we couldn't get too many trees, so we planted them everywhere and later had to dig some up, but it was good to have lots of shade for the children to play in. Melvin and Phyllis were happy children and played well together. We enjoyed having our family come to visit. We didn't have any electricity so we used the old fashioned lamps to light our home. As the years passed by we were happy in our little farm. In the fall of 1925 Kenneth was born, 22nd of November. Kenneth was born in the old home on Dad's farm. All the family was there and wanted him named Kenneth. Grandma Allred was there too and she wanted him named Park, so we called him Kenneth Park Anderson, and we always liked it. Ken was born on Sunday and the following week the threshers pulled on to our place and threshed our crop. It had rained so much all fall we couldn't get it done any sooner. The following winter was cold and we had lots of sickness. There was measles and mumps and chicken pox and whooping cough around the community. Melvin and Phyllis in school they got them all and so Ken had them when he was so young, but with constant care and watching he got through it all. As spring came and the days turned sunny and warm again, health returned to our family and all was well with us again. In April we bought our first car, a Ford. When Kenneth was nine months old he started walking. He never was satisfied to walk, he always ran and got lots of bumps. We had a cupboard in our kitchen with wide shelves in the bottom and a curtain across the front and Kenneth would crawl up in there and play with all the pans and lids. In the Spring of 1929 section 29 was divided up in to small plots of from 10 to 20 acres, so we bought 15 acres there so we could be closer to school and church. In the fall of 1929 we moved. Ken was four years old when we moved so won't remember much about it. It was an old house so took a lot of fixing, but we were thrilled to have it to work on. We had so many plans for our home and family. Two years later Marlin was born in this house, 8th December 1931. Uncle Marlin Allred from Arizona was staying with us then for a visit so we named Marlin after him. He was so pleased he bought him a whole new outfit of clothes. We enjoyed the new baby and Uncle Marlin stayed for a few weeks and helped me take care of him. Ken was six years old when Marlin was born so we enjoyed having another baby in the home. He was a healthy, happy baby and grew up so fast and when he was three years old Dennis was born, 8th October 1934. So we had two little boys together and we enjoyed them so much. When Dennis was one year old his father became ill with Brights disease and was sick most of the time. So in the fall we went to Arizona and California to see if the warmer climate would help him. We went with my Mother and Dad and Grandma Johnson and Florence and we took Dennis with us. Arvilla and Ivan took care of Melvin and Phyllis and Ken and Marlin. We wanted to take them but there wasn't room. We left on the 14 November 1936. Grandma Johnson stayed with her girls in California and Hillman stayed with some of his relatives to take treatments for his health. The rest of us came home. The winter was so long and lonesome. His health didn't improve and on the 13th of March 1937 he came home a very sick man and passed away on 24th of March 1937. After the funeral I stayed with my mother and dad for almost three weeks and they were so good to all of us and all our friends did so much for us. It was so hard to take care of the children away from home so we went back, heartsick and lonely. The children were so good to help and so we started a new life alone. We were buying our home and land, fifteen acres of land, and we had five horses and two cows and some pigs and so we worked thinning beets and different things until our place was paid for. Melvin was seventeen, Phyllis fifteen, Kenneth twelve, Marlin five and Dennis two and half years. When Dennis and Marlin were small I got them a little wagon and when I went to the store or over to Grandma and Grandpa's I would pull them along in the wagon. We finally sold our horses and cows because we didn't have any pasture for them and it was so hard to get feed for them. One winter Mother and Dad and the ones that were home then, came over and stayed with me because I was so lonely. When I think of it now I guess it was hard for them to leave their home to come, but I really enjoyed it. Phyllis and my sister Marie went to school together and enjoyed the winter together. Mother had a heart attack and was very sick. There was no hospital in Taber then, so we took her to Lethbridge. She got better but always had to be so careful after that or it would come back again. They moved back home in the spring and the next winter they went to Arizona and stayed for a couple of months, which they enjoyed very much.

Dennis Anderson

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

As written by his mother Myrl Johnson in her memoir: In the year 1957 Dennis worked in Lethbridge at Smith Motors and while there met a beautiful girl Dorothy Karl. On the 21 of February 1958 Dennis and Dorothy were married and made their home at Cranford. Dennis took over the White Rose gas station, which keeps him busy. On the 1st of March 1959 Calvin, a little son was born to them in the hospital at Lethbridge. That same year Melvin was living in Lethbridge and he moved his family back to Barnwell and went into partnership with Dennis in the White Rose gas business and they are still working together in 1962. On the 12 of February 1962 another little son was born to Dennis and Dorothy, his name Carey. He looks so much like Calvin. They are sure beautiful children. Carey was born in the hospital in Lethbridge too.

Marlin Anderson - Short Stories From His Life

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

As written by Marlin Anderson in 2007: "My father died when I was 5 years old and I have no memory of him as he had been sick for a number of years and was often away from home. One memory I have is coming home from school in the winter with my brother Dennis. Our mother was working at the local grocery store and had banked the coal stove for the day. We were not allowed to touch it. To keep warm we put on our skates and played hockey on the pond close to our home until she came home. Dennis and I were very close growing up. There was less than 3 years between us in age. My fondest memory of growing up is the way my mother help the family together after my father died. She was only 37 and had no training but was able to provide for her 5 children and raise us in the church. She has always been a great inspiration in my life." Marlin played forward and was point guard for the basketball team the last year he was in school. They were the Barnwell Wolves and he was #7. He played 3 years for the team. The school had no gym so all practice and games were in the church cultural hall. Raymond was always a close rival. Marlin has always loved basketball and coached his three boys in Junior High and High School. He coached the High School girl's team the year before his daughter played. While teaching in Junior High he coached the girls' team to a championship. Marlin had 1 year at Calgary Tech and took a farm mechanics course. He also played on the Tech basketball team. At the age of 40 Marlin went to the University of Lethbridge and got a Bachelors of Education degree in less than three years. Teaching allowed him the opportunity to work with the youth. There was no partying. He was the Bishop, a father, and was teaching early morning seminary. Every morning after seminary he had a 35 minute drive to university. Marlin served a mission in Denmark for two and a half years, from December 1953 to June 1956. He learned Danish after arriving in the mission field. Marlin writes, "my first companion was an elderly man who spoke Danish and was a great help in learning the language." Marlin had many wonderful experiences, especially serving twice as branch president and concluding his mission serving as a district president. At that time the church was operated by the mission. One elderly lady Marlin baptized invited others into her home and they also joined. Marlin writes, "after my mission in Denmark I was released by the mission president. Four other missionaries and myself then rented a car and spent 30 days touring continental Europe and then 7 days in England. It was a wonderful experience." Many years later, Marlin writes, "I can still speak some Danish. A Danish family moved into our area and I had their oldest daughter in school and I practiced my Danish while I taught her English. After they moved back my wife and I visited them twice in Denmark." Asking about his wife Joan, Marlin responded, "I met my wife in the spring of 1960 at a friend's wedding. I was impressed. We had our first date on July 1st and were married on August 24th. I was 28. We went on a honeymoon to Banff and Jasper. We will have been married for 47 years this August." (written in 2007) Marlin graduated from the University of Lethbridge in May 1975. His first job was as the principle of a small country school. Marlin's wife Joan taught grades 4 through 6. It was a great experience with wonderful parental support. The community school Christmas concerts and other activities were great fun. Marlin then taught junior high for 18 years. He retired in 1993. When asked in 2007 about his cars, Marlin answered, "I've owned (bought) 102 cars, counting ones I've bought for my kids. My favorite car was probably the 1960 red chevrolet convertible I had when I got married. I've owned many different makes but have always wanted to have a new Mercedes S500. I've been wondering why I love cars myself for 40 years!" Marlin explains why he loves golf: "I've been playing golf for over 30 years. Golf is a great sport. The courses are beautiful, it is good exercise and I enjoy the association of the family and friend I play with. For many years a group of friends and our wives played a tournament in Kalispell, Montana. We played for a trophy that I bought and the winner had his name engraved on it and kept it for a year until the next tournament. I've always loved playing with my three sons." Marlin writes about serving in the church: "I was Bishop of the Barnwell Ward from September 1967 to September 1974. (7 years) I also served on the Taber Stake Young Men's Presidency and on the Taber Stake High Council. For 9 and a half years I was the first councillor in the Taber Stake Presidency. A favorite calling was the many years I spent teaching the Gospel Doctrine class. My wife and I also enjoyed the years we served as ordinance workers in the Cardston Alberta Temple." Marlin writes about music: "I have always loved good music and been touched by it and the spirituality it can bring into your life. I have had lessons given to my own children, especially my daughter Karen, and have encouraged my grandchildren in their music. I appreciate the hard work and achievements of our family in piano, violin, harp and many instruments played in school bands. My favorite song is O Divine Redeemer, especially when my granddaughter Kristy sings it." Marlin tells about his 2nd mission: "My second mission, served with my wife, was from November 1994 to December 1995. Our youngest son Thomas was also serving a mission at the same time. We served in the Dallas Texas Mission. The Lord expects us to serve and our proselyting mission was a wonderful experience. We helped establish a branch in Palestine, Texas and had the unique opportunity of visiting LDS boys in four federal prisons. The many experiences and service in church callings always adds to ones effectiveness as a missionary. The conversions and friendships are made forever." Advice from Marlin: "My advice to my posterity would be to stay close to the Lord, live the Gospel, and keep His commandments. I would like to be remembered as a man who loved his wife and his family."

Life timeline of Dennis Francis Anderson

1934
Dennis Francis Anderson was born on 8 Oct 1934
Dennis Francis Anderson was 11 years old when World War II: Hiroshima, Japan is devastated when the atomic bomb "Little Boy" is dropped by the United States B-29 Enola Gay. Around 70,000 people are killed instantly, and some tens of thousands die in subsequent years from burns and radiation poisoning. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
Dennis Francis Anderson was 21 years old when Disneyland Hotel opens to the public in Anaheim, California. The Disneyland Hotel is a resort hotel located at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, owned by the Walt Disney Company and operated through its Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division. Opened on October 5, 1955, as a motor inn owned and operated by Jack Wrather under an agreement with Walt Disney, the hotel was the first to officially bear the Disney name. Under Wrather's ownership, the hotel underwent several expansions and renovations over the years before being acquired by Disney in 1988. The hotel was downsized to its present capacity in 1999 as part of the Disneyland Resort expansion.
Dennis Francis Anderson was 30 years old when Martin Luther King Jr. received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Born in Atlanta, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, tactics his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi helped inspire.
1977
Dennis Francis Anderson was 43 years old when Star Wars is released in theaters. Star Wars is a 1977 American epic space opera film written and directed by George Lucas. It is the first film in the original Star Wars trilogy and the beginning of the Star Wars franchise. Starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, Alec Guinness, David Prowse, James Earl Jones, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, and Peter Mayhew, the film focuses on the Rebel Alliance, led by Princess Leia (Fisher), and its attempt to destroy the Galactic Empire's space station, the Death Star.
Dennis Francis Anderson died on 15 Oct 1982 at the age of 48
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Dennis Francis Anderson (8 Oct 1934 - 15 Oct 1982), BillionGraves Record 11174236 Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta, Canada

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