Fredrick George Kemper

1905 - 1939

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Fredrick George Kemper

1905 - 1939
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Fredrick George Kemper was born March 31, 1905 at Liberty, near Lancaster Wisconsin. He died September 21, 1939, when his truck was hit by a railroad train as he was returning from delivering a load of sugar beets to the dump which was just a quarter mile north of our home in Cranford, Alberta, Cana
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Life Information

Fredrick George Kemper

Nasceu:
Morreu:

Barnwell Cemetery

Township Road 95
Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta
Canada
Copista

melohnt

October 30, 2013
Fotógrafo

Reni4bz

September 28, 2013

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Fredrick George Kemper (recollections of Wm. Doral Kemper, July 2014)

Colaborador: melohnt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Fredrick George Kemper was born March 31, 1905 at Liberty, near Lancaster Wisconsin. He died September 21, 1939, when his truck was hit by a railroad train as he was returning from delivering a load of sugar beets to the dump which was just a quarter mile north of our home in Cranford, Alberta, Canada. Fred desired that he would not be the cause of embarrassment to others. When neighbors needed help, such as when harvesting alfalfa hay, they would often ask Will Kemper if any of his boys could come and help. The boys were pleased to do this because the neighbors treated them like royalty, feeding them abundant food on the best china. Myron told me a time when he and Fred had gone to help the Doram family harvest their hay. The noon meal was served to them on a table covered with a beautiful crocheted tablecloth. The meal began with baked bread hot from the oven and a fresh green salad spread on their plates by their hostess, who then returned to the kitchen to get the main course. As she left the dining room Myron saw Fred turn over a leaf of lettuce with his fork and discover a healthy wooly worm. Realizing how embarrassed Mrs. Doram would be if she saw the worm, Fred folded the lettuce leaf around the worm and ate it while she carried in the meat and potatoes! As one of the oldest sons in the family of Orah Divall and William Fredrick Kemper, his education at the local school ended after the eighth grade and Fred went to work on the farm during farming season, which was April to October. For the next few years he spent the winter months attending the Technical School at Olds, Alberta, where he learned how to construct and repair machinery, cars and trucks and how to build houses, barns and other buildings necessary on farms. Fred’s dad Will Kemper was a leader in the Cranford community, getting the local one-room school built and helping maintain the ditch that came from the northwest corner of Chin lake, passed through the Kemper farm, and provided water for livestock, gardens, etc. down to Barnwell. Will was a strongly religious person who read his Bible regularly and lead his family in prayer at the beginning of their meals. Growing up in Wisconsin in the 1870 to 1890 era, he was exposed to the “anti-Mormon” news that emphasized their practice of polygamy and accepting of new scriptures and doctrine that was not in the Holy Bible. Consequently Will and Orah helped organize and conduct Sunday, United Church meetings at the school house, where Will would provide the sermon for neighbors who were not Mormons. Although the Mormons had stopped practicing polygamy before Fred was born, Will and Orah felt that this Mormon church was opposed to the real work of God, and they did what they could to protect their family and community from the Mormon doctrine which was dominant in the Barnwell area. Consequently they were shocked and angry when Fred announced, when he was about twenty years old, that he was joining the Mormon church. Will was so angry that he told Fred that if he joined the church, he was not to return to the Kemper home and infect his brothers with this Mormon Gospel. However, within a few years, need for Fred’s assistance on the growing farm and Fred’s engagement to Leona Peterson brought him back in contact with his parents. Leona had taught Fred’s younger brothers in school, had lived in the Kemper home and had become one of Orah’s closest friends during that time. As the depression deepened, prices for farm products declined and when farmers’ machinery broke down they often could not afford a “city mechanic” to fix their implements. They would come to Fred and with his tools and blacksmith forge, he would put their implements back in working order. I never saw dad take payment for such help. He would wave away proffered payments from struggling neighbors and say, “someday I‘ll need your help!” To keep his own tractors running dad would get together with a relative or neighbor and in his old truck full of used barrels would drive up to Drumheller, where methane from producing gas wells was directed at cold plates which condensed the heptane, octane and other longer chain hydrocarbons. This “distillate” could be purchased for one dollar per barrel if you had your own barrels (this was forty Imperial gallons). Dad had adjusted the carburetors on his tractor to use this distillate and a truckload would last him and his neighbor Melvin Cunningham for the whole season of farm work. The road back to Chin dropped from the plains down to the bed of the Old Man River near Lethbridge. Coming down this steep grade with a full load had caused many trucks to pick up too much speed and crash down at the bottom. This fate almost befell Fred and Mel on one of these trips. They barely got the old truck stopped at the bottom of the hill but one of the brakes had become so hot that the rubber lining had caught on fire and was threatening the wooden bed of the truck and thence the gas tank and load of distillate! Mel yelled that they ought to run but Fred walked up to the burning brake drum and urinated on it. The fire died out and they were able to continue their trip home. As Fred’s success as a firefighter was spread via the barber shops and pool halls by Mel and others, Fred’s friends would ask him how it felt to advance on a fire with only his personal equipment. One report was that Fred grinned and replied, “I wished I had a longer hose!” Fred had learned enough about electricity at the Technical schools that he built his own wind powered electrical system. The energy stored in those banks of batteries provided the first electric lights in the Chin area. The strong southern Alberta winds made this possible, but also blew down the tower on which his wind charger was mounted. He sited his next home across the road from the Calgary Power line in Cranford, but ran out of time. The electricity came across the road about four years after Fred died. In the Chin community one of the major social events of the year was a reception in September for the new teacher hired to teach at the one-room school. This was an almost annual event because home-steading farmers had often proved space on their homesteads, built their basic houses, and were desirous of making them into homes by adding an educated wife! These new teachers generally had just one year of training at normal school after the eleventh grade and were about twenty years old. Mrs. Ross generally was hostess at this event since she had a beautiful set of china with delicate white china tea cups. It was at one of these receptions that Fred said he saw the bravest act that he could remember. As tea was served to the brand new teacher she flinched and dropped her cup which shattered on the hardwood floor, drawing the attention of everyone. Fred said he happened to be standing next to John Ross who sized up the situation and threw his cup of tea onto the floor, diverting the attention of everyone in the room away from the tender beginning school teacher to himself. Fred said that while he did not see Mrs. Ross’ chastisement of John for this act, he was confident that it occurred, and was proud to know that his friend was willing to undergo such punishment for a good cause. While in Chin, he also built the first telephone line used there. Originally it only connected us to our neighbors who were each a mile away. However, with the help of brothers and neighbors dad extended it from Chin to Cranford. Roy, dad’s youngest brother maintained it for several years after dad’s death and it was given to the Alberta Telephone Company when it was tied into their system. The old telephone line was used often. Neighbors who had no telephone were welcome to use it. People who had break-downs on the highway were welcome to come in and use it – whether we were home or not. The doors to our homes were never locked so dad could better help others who needed what he had. One Sunday morning after we had moved to Cranford, near the railroad, Fred was getting ready for Sunday school and an old “tramp” rolled out of a railroad train and stumbled into our home. The tramp looked and smelled like he had not bathed for years and he had a large and infected wound on one of his arms. Fred called the other counselor in the Sunday School presidency and asked if he could conduct the opening exercises because Fred had another job to do. Fred and Leona washed the old tramp, dressed his wound, bandaged it with strips of cloth torn from a clean sheet, gave him the medications they had and arranged a ride for him to the distant home of his relatives. During this “substitute for Sunday School” they bore sincere testimony to this old tramp that he was a son of God, and thereby worthy of their love and attention. He left our home in some of Fred’s clean clothes. I was proud of what my parents had done! Discipline was an important and essential part of Fred’s life. When I (Doral) was late coming home from school one day when I was seven years old because it was fun playing with my friend on the retired steam tractors that were parked in the Powells’ yard, it had caused Leona concern. Fred discussed Leona’s concern with me and I agreed that I should not be late again. However, a few days later I succumbed again to the attraction of the friend and the old steam tractors and was late again. Fred discussed the concern that I was causing mother and the fact that I had agreed to not doing this again! I agreed to the fact that I deserved punishment. But as he placed me across his knee and swatted my backside, I let out a howl thinking that this would help terminate the punishment. He then taught me the most important lesson of my life, saying: “You deserve this and the spanking will continue till you stop howling.” Recognizing the need that every boy has for a job, Fred assigned me (Doral) the responsibility of taking the milk cows and their calves from the shed near our home to the pasture, which included the banks of the canal and was about 1/3 mile from our home, in the morning and back home in the evenings. This appeared to be a reasonable assignment. However, the 900-lb. cows didn’t have much respect for the 50-pound seven-year-old herder. Recognizing this problem, Fred took a four-foot long branch from one of the new poplars, trimmed off the leaves, and attached a leather strap about an inch wide and three feet long into one end of the branch. He then showed me how to snap the whip and those big cows suddenly gained respect for me as I took them to and from the pasture, always carrying my whip! As Fred grew up water was scarce and he was so busy that he did not find time to spend at the Old Man River that was four miles from their home. Consequently he did not learn how to swim. Consequently about seven years after Fred and Leona were married and they were gathered for an afternoon swim at the Petersons’ stock pond on a hot summer afternoon Fred was in his Sunday suit on the bank. At six years old I waded into the pond in a pair of shorts. I got out beyond my depth and went under while no one was watching but Fred checked on the group and noticed I was gone. Fred dashed into the pond in his Sunday suit where I had been playing, found me submerged unconscious and carried me up on the bank where Leona and others helped get me breathing again. This event motivated Fred to build a shallow pond three feet deep on his land beside the Taber District Canal which ran through the farm. Three feet was deep enough for me to learn to swim! After I had learned to swim, Fred built a stock watering pond near our Cranford home and hammered about 8 cedar fence posts into a raft that floated on that pond. He showed me how to lay on that raft looking down between the posts and see the pollywogs, salamanders, and other creatures that accompanied fish that we had captured in the canal and brought to our pond in buckets. Following Fred’s death, neighbors sought us out to help repay our family for things Dad had done for them. I can remember owners of granaries, garages, barns and homes showing me how well those structures had been planned and built with the help of my dad. On returning home one winter night following dad’s death we found a quarter of beef hanging in the stairwell of our basement home. None of our neighbors or relatives ever admitted to providing this meat that enriched our diet over the next several months, but we suspected the whole community of this and other kind deeds. They came and built a levee that enabled us to irrigate more of our dry parched land and when we thanked them they responded that, “Fred was always the first to arrive to help on such projects.” In these and many other ways Fred was still with us and will forever be a part of our characters as we try to follow his example and do what we can to help others.

Fredrick George Kemper (31 March 1905 – 23 September 1939)

Colaborador: melohnt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Fred tried to out fun a train across the tracks in his pickup truck going into the hamlet of Cranford Alberta Canada and lost that war with the train. His wife Leona said as soon as she hear the whissel go on the train and herd the crash she new that Fred was gone. He had only left the house a short time before heading for Cranford. Good example of why you should not try to out run a train.

Fredrick George Kemper (recollections of Wm. Doral Kemper, July 2014)

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

Fredrick George Kemper was born March 31, 1905 at Liberty, near Lancaster Wisconsin. He died September 21, 1939, when his truck was hit by a railroad train as he was returning from delivering a load of sugar beets to the dump which was just a quarter mile north of our home in Cranford, Alberta, Canada. Fred desired that he would not be the cause of embarrassment to others. When neighbors needed help, such as when harvesting alfalfa hay, they would often ask Will Kemper if any of his boys could come and help. The boys were pleased to do this because the neighbors treated them like royalty, feeding them abundant food on the best china. Myron told me a time when he and Fred had gone to help the Doram family harvest their hay. The noon meal was served to them on a table covered with a beautiful crocheted tablecloth. The meal began with baked bread hot from the oven and a fresh green salad spread on their plates by their hostess, who then returned to the kitchen to get the main course. As she left the dining room Myron saw Fred turn over a leaf of lettuce with his fork and discover a healthy wooly worm. Realizing how embarrassed Mrs. Doram would be if she saw the worm, Fred folded the lettuce leaf around the worm and ate it while she carried in the meat and potatoes! As one of the oldest sons in the family of Orah Divall and William Fredrick Kemper, his education at the local school ended after the eighth grade and Fred went to work on the farm during farming season, which was April to October. For the next few years he spent the winter months attending the Technical School at Olds, Alberta, where he learned how to construct and repair machinery, cars and trucks and how to build houses, barns and other buildings necessary on farms. Fred’s dad Will Kemper was a leader in the Cranford community, getting the local one-room school built and helping maintain the ditch that came from the northwest corner of Chin lake, passed through the Kemper farm, and provided water for livestock, gardens, etc. down to Barnwell. Will was a strongly religious person who read his Bible regularly and lead his family in prayer at the beginning of their meals. Growing up in Wisconsin in the 1870 to 1890 era, he was exposed to the “anti-Mormon” news that emphasized their practice of polygamy and accepting of new scriptures and doctrine that was not in the Holy Bible. Consequently Will and Orah helped organize and conduct Sunday, United Church meetings at the school house, where Will would provide the sermon for neighbors who were not Mormons. Although the Mormons had stopped practicing polygamy before Fred was born, Will and Orah felt that this Mormon church was opposed to the real work of God, and they did what they could to protect their family and community from the Mormon doctrine which was dominant in the Barnwell area. Consequently they were shocked and angry when Fred announced, when he was about twenty years old, that he was joining the Mormon church. Will was so angry that he told Fred that if he joined the church, he was not to return to the Kemper home and infect his brothers with this Mormon Gospel. However, within a few years, need for Fred’s assistance on the growing farm and Fred’s engagement to Leona Peterson brought him back in contact with his parents. Leona had taught Fred’s younger brothers in school, had lived in the Kemper home and had become one of Orah’s closest friends during that time. As the depression deepened, prices for farm products declined and when farmers’ machinery broke down they often could not afford a “city mechanic” to fix their implements. They would come to Fred and with his tools and blacksmith forge, he would put their implements back in working order. I never saw dad take payment for such help. He would wave away proffered payments from struggling neighbors and say, “someday I‘ll need your help!” To keep his own tractors running dad would get together with a relative or neighbor and in his old truck full of used barrels would drive up to Drumheller, where methane from producing gas wells was directed at cold plates which condensed the heptane, octane and other longer chain hydrocarbons. This “distillate” could be purchased for one dollar per barrel if you had your own barrels (this was forty Imperial gallons). Dad had adjusted the carburetors on his tractor to use this distillate and a truckload would last him and his neighbor Melvin Cunningham for the whole season of farm work. The road back to Chin dropped from the plains down to the bed of the Old Man River near Lethbridge. Coming down this steep grade with a full load had caused many trucks to pick up too much speed and crash down at the bottom. This fate almost befell Fred and Mel on one of these trips. They barely got the old truck stopped at the bottom of the hill but one of the brakes had become so hot that the rubber lining had caught on fire and was threatening the wooden bed of the truck and thence the gas tank and load of distillate! Mel yelled that they ought to run but Fred walked up to the burning brake drum and urinated on it. The fire died out and they were able to continue their trip home. As Fred’s success as a firefighter was spread via the barber shops and pool halls by Mel and others, Fred’s friends would ask him how it felt to advance on a fire with only his personal equipment. One report was that Fred grinned and replied, “I wished I had a longer hose!” Fred had learned enough about electricity at the Technical schools that he built his own wind powered electrical system. The energy stored in those banks of batteries provided the first electric lights in the Chin area. The strong southern Alberta winds made this possible, but also blew down the tower on which his wind charger was mounted. He sited his next home across the road from the Calgary Power line in Cranford, but ran out of time. The electricity came across the road about four years after Fred died. In the Chin community one of the major social events of the year was a reception in September for the new teacher hired to teach at the one-room school. This was an almost annual event because home-steading farmers had often proved space on their homesteads, built their basic houses, and were desirous of making them into homes by adding an educated wife! These new teachers generally had just one year of training at normal school after the eleventh grade and were about twenty years old. Mrs. Ross generally was hostess at this event since she had a beautiful set of china with delicate white china tea cups. It was at one of these receptions that Fred said he saw the bravest act that he could remember. As tea was served to the brand new teacher she flinched and dropped her cup which shattered on the hardwood floor, drawing the attention of everyone. Fred said he happened to be standing next to John Ross who sized up the situation and threw his cup of tea onto the floor, diverting the attention of everyone in the room away from the tender beginning school teacher to himself. Fred said that while he did not see Mrs. Ross’ chastisement of John for this act, he was confident that it occurred, and was proud to know that his friend was willing to undergo such punishment for a good cause. While in Chin, he also built the first telephone line used there. Originally it only connected us to our neighbors who were each a mile away. However, with the help of brothers and neighbors dad extended it from Chin to Cranford. Roy, dad’s youngest brother maintained it for several years after dad’s death and it was given to the Alberta Telephone Company when it was tied into their system. The old telephone line was used often. Neighbors who had no telephone were welcome to use it. People who had break-downs on the highway were welcome to come in and use it – whether we were home or not. The doors to our homes were never locked so dad could better help others who needed what he had. One Sunday morning after we had moved to Cranford, near the railroad, Fred was getting ready for Sunday school and an old “tramp” rolled out of a railroad train and stumbled into our home. The tramp looked and smelled like he had not bathed for years and he had a large and infected wound on one of his arms. Fred called the other counselor in the Sunday School presidency and asked if he could conduct the opening exercises because Fred had another job to do. Fred and Leona washed the old tramp, dressed his wound, bandaged it with strips of cloth torn from a clean sheet, gave him the medications they had and arranged a ride for him to the distant home of his relatives. During this “substitute for Sunday School” they bore sincere testimony to this old tramp that he was a son of God, and thereby worthy of their love and attention. He left our home in some of Fred’s clean clothes. I was proud of what my parents had done! Discipline was an important and essential part of Fred’s life. When I (Doral) was late coming home from school one day when I was seven years old because it was fun playing with my friend on the retired steam tractors that were parked in the Powells’ yard, it had caused Leona concern. Fred discussed Leona’s concern with me and I agreed that I should not be late again. However, a few days later I succumbed again to the attraction of the friend and the old steam tractors and was late again. Fred discussed the concern that I was causing mother and the fact that I had agreed to not doing this again! I agreed to the fact that I deserved punishment. But as he placed me across his knee and swatted my backside, I let out a howl thinking that this would help terminate the punishment. He then taught me the most important lesson of my life, saying: “You deserve this and the spanking will continue till you stop howling.” Recognizing the need that every boy has for a job, Fred assigned me (Doral) the responsibility of taking the milk cows and their calves from the shed near our home to the pasture, which included the banks of the canal and was about 1/3 mile from our home, in the morning and back home in the evenings. This appeared to be a reasonable assignment. However, the 900-lb. cows didn’t have much respect for the 50-pound seven-year-old herder. Recognizing this problem, Fred took a four-foot long branch from one of the new poplars, trimmed off the leaves, and attached a leather strap about an inch wide and three feet long into one end of the branch. He then showed me how to snap the whip and those big cows suddenly gained respect for me as I took them to and from the pasture, always carrying my whip! As Fred grew up water was scarce and he was so busy that he did not find time to spend at the Old Man River that was four miles from their home. Consequently he did not learn how to swim. Consequently about seven years after Fred and Leona were married and they were gathered for an afternoon swim at the Petersons’ stock pond on a hot summer afternoon Fred was in his Sunday suit on the bank. At six years old I waded into the pond in a pair of shorts. I got out beyond my depth and went under while no one was watching but Fred checked on the group and noticed I was gone. Fred dashed into the pond in his Sunday suit where I had been playing, found me submerged unconscious and carried me up on the bank where Leona and others helped get me breathing again. This event motivated Fred to build a shallow pond three feet deep on his land beside the Taber District Canal which ran through the farm. Three feet was deep enough for me to learn to swim! After I had learned to swim, Fred built a stock watering pond near our Cranford home and hammered about 8 cedar fence posts into a raft that floated on that pond. He showed me how to lay on that raft looking down between the posts and see the pollywogs, salamanders, and other creatures that accompanied fish that we had captured in the canal and brought to our pond in buckets. Following Fred’s death, neighbors sought us out to help repay our family for things Dad had done for them. I can remember owners of granaries, garages, barns and homes showing me how well those structures had been planned and built with the help of my dad. On returning home one winter night following dad’s death we found a quarter of beef hanging in the stairwell of our basement home. None of our neighbors or relatives ever admitted to providing this meat that enriched our diet over the next several months, but we suspected the whole community of this and other kind deeds. They came and built a levee that enabled us to irrigate more of our dry parched land and when we thanked them they responded that, “Fred was always the first to arrive to help on such projects.” In these and many other ways Fred was still with us and will forever be a part of our characters as we try to follow his example and do what we can to help others.

Fredrick George Kemper (31 March 1905 – 23 September 1939)

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

Fred tried to out fun a train across the tracks in his pickup truck going into the hamlet of Cranford Alberta Canada and lost that war with the train. His wife Leona said as soon as she hear the whissel go on the train and herd the crash she new that Fred was gone. He had only left the house a short time before heading for Cranford. Good example of why you should not try to out run a train.

Life timeline of Fredrick George Kemper

1905
Fredrick George Kemper was born in 1905
Fredrick George Kemper was 12 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Fredrick George Kemper was 24 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Fredrick George Kemper died in 1939 at the age of 34
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Fredrick George Kemper (1905 - 1939), BillionGraves Record 5719682 Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta, Canada

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