Geneva Stevens

1905 - 2001

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Geneva Stevens

1905 - 2001
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Grave site information of Geneva Stevens (1905 - 2001) at Barnwell Cemetery in Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta, Canada from BillionGraves
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Life Information

Geneva Stevens

Nasceu:
Morreu:

Barnwell Cemetery

Township Road 95
Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta
Canada

Epitáfio

Rest in peace
Copista

Reni4bz

October 4, 2013
Fotógrafo

Reni4bz

September 30, 2013

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Ruth Ann’s memories of Lavone and Ellen

Colaborador: Reni4bz Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

[Memories recorded by Ruth Ann Keeler about her mother and father-in-law Marquis Lavone Johnson and Ellen Johnson. Recorded in 2013] When Bruce and I were dating, he invited me to their home many times. His Mom was very hospitable and made me feel very welcome. I was invited to eat with them if I was there at mealtime. It was a surprise to me. Nobody talked while they were having dinner. His Mom was a good cook and always had yummy desserts. I had never seen people eat pie cut in quarters. My Mom always cut pie into sixths or maybe sevenths, depending on how many people were around the table. Ellen was very generous in her servings. Over the years, as we visited, I discovered that she was a very loyal person. She rarely said anything negative about her siblings, her children and her best friends. In fact I soon learned never to complain about Bruce in her presence, as she was obviously offended and I tried not to complain about farmer’s hours for meals. Bruce and his Dad were notorious about coming in to eat at their convenience, not at a regular time. It could be ten o’clock at night when they came in. Bruce and his Dad milked cows, often as many as 20. The milk was separated and the cream was taken to Lethbridge to the dairy. In the summer when the men were very busy farming, I usually drove his Mom and Aunt Geneva, with my little ones, to Lethbridge with the cream. These two women said that they knew how to drive a car, but I never witnessed it. I was the chauffeur during the summer months, and then in the winter the men would do the driving. We often shopped for groceries before we returned home. This was a weekly trip. The cream check was an important part of the income for both of us. Ellen was very meticulous in washing the separator, the cans, bottles or anything else that stored the milk and cream. She would rinse everything with boiling water. I was impressed with her cleanliness. She always would sweep her back step and then all the ground around it. Larry would tease her about this. I was also impressed with her willingness to always include Aunt Geneva when we went to Lethbridge. Her siblings were very important to her and she included them whenever she could. I remember visiting with Aunt Mable and she told me that when she left home to go to business school as a young adult, her sister Ellen would write to her often and would generously include a little money. Ellen was working in Taber as a secretary for the Sheriff and was good to help others in her family. After I came into the family I noticed that when Bruce’s parents would visit Aunt Mable and Uncle Tom, they always took with them vegetables out of the garden or some baking she had made for the occasion. She was extremely sensitive to the needs of her extended family, and if she had extra, she was always willing to share. Her sister’s welfare was a concern to her and I remember when her older sister Sina passed away, she really grieved over this as she felt that she was too young to leave this world and felt there had been some neglect by those in the health care. Although his parents were not always actively going to church when Bruce was growing up, his Mother was the secretary in the Relief Society for 27 years. She was very dependable and this calling was extended over seven Relief Society presidents: Erma Nielsen 1936-1938 Ellice Lebaron 1938-1942 Winona Stevens 1942-1946 Arvilla Anderson 1946-1950 Louisa Irving 1950-1956 Ela Mercer 1956-1959 Myrl Jensen 1959-1965 When Myrl Jensen’s counsellor was released, Ellen became her counsellor and Francis Bullock became the new secretary. Her children could never remember a time that their mother was not involved in Relief Society. Many quilts were made by the Relief Society and Ellen and her sister Geneva Stevens stitched on them along with Jessie Johnson, Myrl Jensen, Lela Johnson, Bessie Johnson, Viola Anderson, Mable Howells and many other dedicated women. She often said that she never worried about being asked to be on the program for a social activity, funerals or weddings as she and Geneva were always serving in the kitchen. One of the characteristics that she had that surprised me, was she was very nervous about going out into the garden or down into the root cellar. In fact, I don’t think she ever did go down into the root cellar. She was terrified of mice and the possibility of seeing a garden snake or a salamander was too awful to imagine. If the cows managed to get out on the road and the men were not around, she would call me to get them back into the pasture. As a Grandmother, Ellen was there to help with her grandchildren. She was always willing to lend a hand. I could not have asked for better in-laws. They were so generous to Bruce and I and our children. Undoubtedly there were times that all these little mischievous grandsons that lived next door must have tested their patience but the children knew they were loved. She was always very excited when Larry and Catherine came to visit. She cleaned her house from top to bottom and often they would stay several weeks as Larry had many vacation days. Although it was their vacation, Larry never spent the time sitting under the tree or sunbathing; he eagerly pitched in and helped on the farm. Their sons, Mike and Cameron also spent their summers working on the farm as they became old enough. Having a big vegetable garden, we worked together in picking, shelling and freezing our peas for the winter. We picked, husked and cut the corn off the cob and put it in the freezer. We raised chickens and in the early years we butchered, cleaned and put them into the deep freeze. We shared a beef and pork to put in our deepfreeze also. Having plenty of milk, cream, meat and vegetables, it was good food that we shared. It was hard work but together it lightened the load. Every Thanksgiving day, beet harvest was stopped as this was the day we dug the potatoes and carrots out of our garden and put them into the root cellar for the winter, then we enjoyed our turkey dinner. Ellen and Lavone had many friends that would socialize and have parties but gradually in their later years, it was mostly Jessie, George, Geneva and Slim who spent their evening’s playing cards. She always had cookies and punch available for these events. They would go on little trips together but in their retiring years, Ellen was very nervous in the car and very often would put her back out of place by pushing hard on the floor of the car from anxiety. Eventually Lavone retired from farming. Bruce often stopped into their home and watched TV with them. They loved to watch the game shows. Also, Lavone would go into Taber and lend a hand to Pat in her flower shop. He enjoyed the people that worked with her and felt good to help his daughter. He did this for quite a few years. However, eventually he became concerned about his wife as her health deteriorated and he spent a lot of time taking care of her. He did the laundry, ironing and even baked bread. They both preferred homemade bread. Finally it became too difficult for him to take care of her and she was put into the hospital. After George and Slim died, Geneva and Jessie would have a daily walk for exercise. Ellen was struggling with arthritis and had an enlarged heart so she was unable to participate. Finally Geneva moved up to Lethbridge with her sister Mable and Ellen felt deserted. Her appetite lessened, she became very thin, almost anorexic. Lavone was very good to her and did the best he could but she had to be hospitalized. Larry and Cathy came down to Taber to be with her. The last night, Catherine and I sat with her, doing what we could to make her comfortable. Then at 6:00 A.M. the nurses told us to leave as they were going to do the necessary care and we left as Larry and Bruce were going to come in and sit with her. Before we arrived in Barnwell, they phoned from the hospital and said she had passed away. It seemed that as long as the family was there she was not ready to pass on, only when we left. Bruce’s Dad seemed quite capable of living by himself. We would visit him and he was jolly and we often commented how good he was not to make us feel neglectful or guilty. He just seemed to be happy whenever anyone dropped in to see him. He always had a dish of candy to share with the little kids as they visited him. Gradually, we noticed that he was not eating well. Bruce often went over and ate breakfast with him. Pat arranged for Home Care to help him. I would send dinner over to him. He was put into the hospital for a short time and when he came home we had him move in with us. But one stormy Sunday he was not able to stand the noise of our grandchildren and he decided to go back to his own home. Eventually we could see he was showing signs of depression and the family urged him to move into the Lodge. He lasted one month only. We took him to Utah with us as he was always talking about it. I went shopping in a craft shop and was in there for quite some time. Bruce and his Dad were sitting in the car. His comment to everyone when we came home was, “We sat in the car on Main Street for a very long time and I didn’t see one person that I knew.” Lavone was a good driver but his eyesight and hearing became impaired in his later years and he was a hazard on the road. He drove into a semi trailer in Taber but he still didn’t think he needed to quit driving. It was only when Loren pulled the wires in his pickup that he no longer drove his vehicle. Bruce couldn’t bring himself to do it. When Bruce was ill in the hospital and Lavone came in with pneumonia the Doctor told him that he could no longer live alone at home and had to go into extended care. He was first put into the extended care in Lethbridge and Bruce would drive up there to get him to eat as he was quite depressed and unresponsive even though they were very good to him there. Eventually there was a place in Taber for him. They had to put him in the lock up area because he kept telling everyone that he was going to go to Provo and they were afraid that he would just up and leave on his own. Gradually he became happy and contented. His appetite increased and when we visited him he wanted to know where Bruce was. Bruce would say, “Well I’m Bruce.” He was forgetting who we were but knew we were familiar. He did well for being 96.

Ellen Johnson

Colaborador: Reni4bz Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Information gathered by her granddaughter Patty Jean and her daughter-in-law Ruth Ann Ellen was born in Winter Quarters, Utah. This was a small, temporary settlement for those who worked in the mines and eventually was deserted. Both her parents, John Peter Johnson and Solrum (Lula) Gudmundsdottir Johnson had moved to Utah from Iceland. There were twelve children in this family, Ellen being number eight. The oldest, Hannah, was a half sister who died at the young age of 27. She had three other siblings; William Johnston Johnson (1893-1895), Mary Florence Johnson (1899-1901), and Leonard Johnson (1901-1902) that died in their infancy before Ellen was even born. So in her lifetime she considered that there were eight in her family, namely Sina(1892-1958), Nathan(1895-1954), Annie (1897-), Ellen(1902-1985), Geneva(1905-), Lyman(1907-), Mabel(1910-) and Esther(1913-). When Ellen was three, the family left the United States and settled in Taber, Alberta. They lived in a four roomed house in the northwest part of Taber, north of the Court House. Sina was 10 years older than Ellen so she has no memories of her living at home and Annie, five years older than Ellen, left home to work. This left Ellen, Geneva, Esther and Mabel sharing one bedroom, making lasting ties that never severed. Her brother Lyman slept in the front room. Ellen’s Mother Lula was a friendly and outgoing person who visited her neighbours daily. She had worked at the ports in Iceland and could understand 4 or 5 languages. She spoke English but was not able to read it. As a family they joked that their mother had to say Good Morning and Good Night to her neighbours as she visited them daily. During High School Ellen did housework for other people to earn a little money. After she finished grade eleven she worked at the Bank of Hamilton (later became the Bank of Commerce) where a young clerk commented, “You are bound to learn as I have never known anyone to ask so many questions.” Her next employment was working as a court reporter in the sheriff’s office where she took dictation. Not having been trained in short-hand she wrote very fast but under one fellow he talked so fast she didn’t always get everything he said. She had very fond memories of those years of employment after High School. She was proud of the fact that she walked to and fro from her home to work, morning and afternoon. This helped to keep her slim. Tennis was also one of her favourite past times. She met Lavone Johnson at a dance. She went to the dance with Wayne Anderson and went home with Lavone. They dated two years before they were married December 11, 1929. He was 24 and she was 26. She still had the same surname as before. Ellen always told her grandchildren that they didn’t need to worry about getting married until they were at least as old as she had been. After they were married they moved to Barnwell where they lived with Lavone’s mother, Ida (Rozina), where he farmed her land. She became pregnant and at the time for delivery she went to her mother’s home to have the baby. Her mother had practiced midwifery for years and Dr. Hammond was available for this event. The birth was not an easy one; Ellen suffered several weeks following this event but the baby was a large and healthy boy. They named him Bruce Lavone Johnson, February 13, 1931. Soon after the birth of their son, they bought a small two-roomed house for $100. In October 13, 1934 Ellen had her second child. Once again she went to Taber to deliver her baby. Patricia Jean was born in Lula’s home. Bruce had a baby sister. This was the thirties, during the depression years and money was scarce. Fortunately these two children came into a home where their parents were resourceful and they never knew hunger. Ellen had the skills to make tasty meals out of the very basic ingredients that they grew. They had a milk cow in which to make butter and milk to drink. They had chickens for eggs and meat as well as a vegetable garden. Ellen canned fruit, meat and vegetables in season so they would have a variety throughout the year. The house did not have modern plumbing but they had a surface well next to their house which provided clean water. Often they would hang food down the well to keep it cool. Her wash water, which had to be carried in and carried out, was heated on the cook stove in a boiler every Monday morning. Monday was always washday and the rinse water was used to wipe up the kitchen floor. Water was never wasted. Initially laundry was done by hand on a scrub board but eventually they had a ringer washing machine and the clothes were hung out on a clothesline on the east side of the house. Although it was difficult to hang clothes out in the cold, the sheets always had a fresh smell that cannot be duplicated in an automatic washer and drier. It was a wonderful experience to crawl into a freshly made bed with those sheets that had been dried outside. Since doing laundry was a big chore, the women wore aprons to protect their house dresses which they would wear for several days. The men and boys did not change overalls daily, and often wore the same pair all week. In the days that water was carried in the Saturday night baths were done in the round rinse tub used for laundry. An outside privy was built a short way from the backdoor and a washstand often was close to the back door. On the washstand would be a bucket of drinking water with a dipper. The whole family drank water out of the dipper. Years later when they built on to their house a modern bathroom and a big entrance for their laundry facilities, Ellen continued to be careful and used water sparingly. They hauled water by the truck load and stored it in a cistern to accommodate the indoor plumbing and the gray water flowed into a septic field. Eventually the village of Barnwell had a water system which did away with the need for a cistern and septic fields. Lavone allowed the village to put the water treatment plant on his property with the agreement that he could have free water for his cattle. Ellen was a tidy homemaker, and a good cook. She made yummy homemade bread and if you were fortunate to visit as she was taking it out of the oven she would willingly share a slice with you. She was very hospitable and a visitor was often invited to have a taste of whatever she was cooking at the time. Ellen was particular in washing her dishes. She always had a tea kettle boiling on her stove in which she scalded her dishes before she dried them. Then she always put her glass tumblers upside down in the cupboard. This was a habit she acquired to keep the dust from collecting inside the glasses. Lavone milked several cows and sold milk and cream around the area. This required Ellen to wash milk bottles and the cream separator. It was crucial to be particular in cleanliness in this endeavour and she was extremely careful. Their third child was born 20 May, 1939. Catherine Olive Johnson was born in Lethbridge, Alberta in the hospital. This little girl cried and cried the first several months of her life. Lavone had put his back out of place and went to the Hutterite colony to a bone doctor for a treatment. The bone doctor saw little Cathy and immediately recognized that her hips were out of place. He gave her a treatment and that was the beginning of a happy existence for baby Catherine. Another convenience that was important to the family was the root cellar. This root cellar stored the carrots and potatoes they had grown in their vegetable garden. It filled their need throughout the winter months and until the next garden season. She also stored her bottled fruit in the cellar. She bottled many jams, jellies, fruit and vegetables to give variety to their meals. Eventually when the Co-op rented frozen storage lockers, peas and corn was frozen instead of bottled, but eventually they bought their own deep freezer and they filled it up with vegetables as well as chicken, beef and pork. Ellen was very resourceful with the means they had. Lavone was given an opportunity to buy a nice little farm in Picture Butte in 1940 and was eager to purchase it, but Ellen refused to budge. She was very attached to her siblings and did not want to be that far away. She was fiercely loyal to her extended family. They gathered together often, the children playing with their cousins and the sisters enjoyed each other’s company. Ellen also felt comfortable with her neighbours and not being adventurous, they remained in Barnwell. Lavone eventually bought his mother’s property but would occasionally mention the opportunity they had passed over, much to Ellen’s annoyance. Christmas was always an important event. When Ellen’s father unexpectantly passed away, he had purchased Christmas presents for the family members. It was a memorable Christmas. Christmas trees could be purchased for $1.00 and were lovingly decorated. They visited neighbours, singing and sharing food at each house. The children would wake up in the morning and Santa never failed to leave happy surprises. The Anderson’s, Sybil, Viola and Ervin, and Glen and Mable Howells lived across the road and were very neighbourly, in which they shared gifts. Bruce remembers receiving much attention from the Anderson sisters and really favoured Mable. Pat remembers sharing desserts from their kitchen table. Ellen and Geneva both sang in the ward choir and served in the Primary organization. One year only one little girl was in Ellen’s Primary class. Her name was Anita Jonnson. Ellen often had her come to her house to teach her the lesson which made this little girl feel special. 1949 was the year that Ellen’s sister Geneva moved next door. Slim sold his farm and began to work as the field man for the Canning Factory in Taber. They moved the house that had been the home of Rozina Johnson (Lavone’s mother) next door to Ellen and Lavone. These two sisters went everywhere together. If Ellen was going to Taber or Lethbridge, she would call Geneva and see if she needed to go as well. They both did their housework first thing in the morning and often had the afternoon to spend together, visiting and doing handwork. Geneva had far more confidence in her capabilities than Ellen and she was a source of strength for her. Anytime Ellen was canning, travelling, quilting, entertaining, or cooking for something special she always involved her sister. In the heat of the summer it was not unusual to see Ellen and Geneva sitting in the shade behind Ellen’s home. They rose early, completing their housework in the morning and rested in the shade on those very warm days. Monday morning was washday and seldom did anyone beat Geneva in getting her laundry out on the clothesline. A clean wash was a sign of a good housekeeper and sheets on the line at early dawn was a good sign that you were not lazy. Ellen was a conscientious housekeeper too, but she didn’t try to compete with Geneva. She loved her sister and loved having her live next door. It was a very sad day, years later, when Geneva became a widow and moved to Lethbridge to live with her sister Mable in a senior’s residence. Ellen had friends besides her neighbours that visited her regularly. Leona Harris who lived in Chin, often would drop in to visit. They both grew up in Taber. She had a son the same age as Bruce and they became good friends. Melvin Lebaron was also a good friend, and the three of them had many good times together. Both Gordon and Melvin appreciated Ellen and her hospitality. She was very warm towards her children’s friends and made them feel welcome. Francis Bullock was a happy, carefree woman that loved to come and share gossip. Ellen enjoyed her company because she was so outgoing, quite a contrast to her conservative nature. Myrl Jensen was a loyal and dear friend and together with their spouses they travelled a bit together. Einar loved to go to the rodeos but this really wasn’t a favourite activity for the Johnson’s but when Einar was the Bishop he had an influence in helping Lavone prepare himself to go to the temple when Bruce was married. Viola Anderson, Ervin Anderson and Mable Howells were regular afternoon visitors. When Lavone’s brother George moved to Barnwell from the Pass, his wife Jessie, a very outgoing personality, became very much part of Ellen’s friends. She was a happy, energetic person and she became fast friends with Ellen and Geneva. In fact, George and Jessie, Slim and Geneva and Ellen and Lavone were very much together in all their social activities. This filled a need for Ellen as she welcomed people into her home but she was timid in reaching out and hesitant to go places alone. She was comfortable when she had someone beside her to do the reaching out and Jessie and Geneva did this for her. As a mother, Ellen was always there for her children. Bruce remembers her teaching him the alphabet from his toy blocks before he went to school. Meals were cooked regularly and she catered to their needs. She lovingly encouraged her children to be good and to be kind to each other. She never raised her voice in anger to her children. All three children participated in sports and Ellen was proud of their achievements. Academically Bruce was quite easy-going, but after High School graduation he went to Tech in Calgary taking automotive mechanics, Pat went to Calgary and took a secretarial course, and Cathy took a year of Education as a school teacher. The skills they acquired were helpful in their adult years. Cathy went to Calgary to learn to be a school teacher and Larry Henry was working at the Hudson Bay Company as a box clerk and gradually worked his way up as manager. They were married August 28, 1958 and lived in Calgary, Banff, Prince George and Trail B.C., Medicine Hat and back to Calgary and eventually retired in Cochrane, Alberta. When Ellen and Lavone travelled to visit them they always brought produce from the garden or anything else she wanted to share with them. She was naturally very generous to those whom she loved and did so graciously. She had an interesting relationship with Larry. Ellen was very sensitive and so no one really tried to tease or joke with her in case it would hurt her feelings, but Larry never hesitated. Ellen worried over many things and could become very stressed at the possibility of something terrible happening, and Larry would laugh and say that no one else in the family needs to worry because Grandma does it all for everyone. He would tease her like no one else could, and she accepted it. Becoming a grandmother was a natural for Ellen. She had the capacity to love each and everyone that came into her family and they knew that she cared.

A Brief Sketch of John Peter Johnson

Colaborador: Reni4bz Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

[This history was found in Bruce Lavone Johnson's files after he died. He was the grandson of John Peter Johnson.] John Peter Johnson was born in Iceland October 6th, 1866 and came to Spanish Fork, Utah in 1874. He was eight years old. He was baptized September 13th 1875 and confirmed a member of the Church the same day by Bro. John A. Lewis. He was active in the Church of Jesus Christ and was ordained as a High Priest by Bro. Hugh B. Brown on the 18 of June 1925 in Taber, Alberta. Solrum (Lula) Gudmundson was born in Iceland the 11 of October 1867. She was married in Iceland and her husband died climbing a mountain. She came to Spanish Fork in 1888 at the age of twenty-one where their first child was born. She later met John Peter Johnson and they were married in Provo, Utah, February 26th 1891. In 1903 they moved to Canada. On their way they stopped in Salt Lake City where they were sealed in the temple and had their eight children sealed to them. They came to Raymond, Alberta and stayed until 1905. One child, Geneva, was born while they lived in Raymond. Then they moved to Taber where three more children were born. When they first came to Taber they had a little farm which he later lost through signing a note for a friend. He later worked as an engineer and steam shovel operator for the Canada West Mine. His son Nathan worked along with him. He stayed there until the mine closed down. He was a counsellor for the Town of Taber for two years. He was a very pleasant person who was even-tempered and friendly. The children said they never saw their father angry. He was a very congenial person. His wife Lula was a great humanitarian, caring much for the sick and was known as a good cook. She was well-known for her home-made pies. They loved company and their home was always open to their friends. When the children were all grown, they took patients into their home as there wasn’t a hospital in Taber and Lula was a practical nurse and a mid-wife. Many babies were born in their home. Lula was on the burial committee before there were funeral services available. John loved his family and he had all their Christmas presents bought and wrapped before he died. He died ten days before Christmas, December 15, 1935. This was a sad Christmas. This couple were well thought of by their many friends. They loved to visit their neighbors. They kept their garden, fruit trees and home in order. They were not wealthy in material things but they were rich in friends and family. Many people remember them for their unselfishness and friendliness. Their posterity as of September 3rd, 1984 is as follows: 12 children 27 grandchildren 111 great grandchildren 74 great, great grandchildren.

Ruth Ann’s memories of Lavone and Ellen

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

[Memories recorded by Ruth Ann Keeler about her mother and father-in-law Marquis Lavone Johnson and Ellen Johnson. Recorded in 2013] When Bruce and I were dating, he invited me to their home many times. His Mom was very hospitable and made me feel very welcome. I was invited to eat with them if I was there at mealtime. It was a surprise to me. Nobody talked while they were having dinner. His Mom was a good cook and always had yummy desserts. I had never seen people eat pie cut in quarters. My Mom always cut pie into sixths or maybe sevenths, depending on how many people were around the table. Ellen was very generous in her servings. Over the years, as we visited, I discovered that she was a very loyal person. She rarely said anything negative about her siblings, her children and her best friends. In fact I soon learned never to complain about Bruce in her presence, as she was obviously offended and I tried not to complain about farmer’s hours for meals. Bruce and his Dad were notorious about coming in to eat at their convenience, not at a regular time. It could be ten o’clock at night when they came in. Bruce and his Dad milked cows, often as many as 20. The milk was separated and the cream was taken to Lethbridge to the dairy. In the summer when the men were very busy farming, I usually drove his Mom and Aunt Geneva, with my little ones, to Lethbridge with the cream. These two women said that they knew how to drive a car, but I never witnessed it. I was the chauffeur during the summer months, and then in the winter the men would do the driving. We often shopped for groceries before we returned home. This was a weekly trip. The cream check was an important part of the income for both of us. Ellen was very meticulous in washing the separator, the cans, bottles or anything else that stored the milk and cream. She would rinse everything with boiling water. I was impressed with her cleanliness. She always would sweep her back step and then all the ground around it. Larry would tease her about this. I was also impressed with her willingness to always include Aunt Geneva when we went to Lethbridge. Her siblings were very important to her and she included them whenever she could. I remember visiting with Aunt Mable and she told me that when she left home to go to business school as a young adult, her sister Ellen would write to her often and would generously include a little money. Ellen was working in Taber as a secretary for the Sheriff and was good to help others in her family. After I came into the family I noticed that when Bruce’s parents would visit Aunt Mable and Uncle Tom, they always took with them vegetables out of the garden or some baking she had made for the occasion. She was extremely sensitive to the needs of her extended family, and if she had extra, she was always willing to share. Her sister’s welfare was a concern to her and I remember when her older sister Sina passed away, she really grieved over this as she felt that she was too young to leave this world and felt there had been some neglect by those in the health care. Although his parents were not always actively going to church when Bruce was growing up, his Mother was the secretary in the Relief Society for 27 years. She was very dependable and this calling was extended over seven Relief Society presidents: Erma Nielsen 1936-1938 Ellice Lebaron 1938-1942 Winona Stevens 1942-1946 Arvilla Anderson 1946-1950 Louisa Irving 1950-1956 Ela Mercer 1956-1959 Myrl Jensen 1959-1965 When Myrl Jensen’s counsellor was released, Ellen became her counsellor and Francis Bullock became the new secretary. Her children could never remember a time that their mother was not involved in Relief Society. Many quilts were made by the Relief Society and Ellen and her sister Geneva Stevens stitched on them along with Jessie Johnson, Myrl Jensen, Lela Johnson, Bessie Johnson, Viola Anderson, Mable Howells and many other dedicated women. She often said that she never worried about being asked to be on the program for a social activity, funerals or weddings as she and Geneva were always serving in the kitchen. One of the characteristics that she had that surprised me, was she was very nervous about going out into the garden or down into the root cellar. In fact, I don’t think she ever did go down into the root cellar. She was terrified of mice and the possibility of seeing a garden snake or a salamander was too awful to imagine. If the cows managed to get out on the road and the men were not around, she would call me to get them back into the pasture. As a Grandmother, Ellen was there to help with her grandchildren. She was always willing to lend a hand. I could not have asked for better in-laws. They were so generous to Bruce and I and our children. Undoubtedly there were times that all these little mischievous grandsons that lived next door must have tested their patience but the children knew they were loved. She was always very excited when Larry and Catherine came to visit. She cleaned her house from top to bottom and often they would stay several weeks as Larry had many vacation days. Although it was their vacation, Larry never spent the time sitting under the tree or sunbathing; he eagerly pitched in and helped on the farm. Their sons, Mike and Cameron also spent their summers working on the farm as they became old enough. Having a big vegetable garden, we worked together in picking, shelling and freezing our peas for the winter. We picked, husked and cut the corn off the cob and put it in the freezer. We raised chickens and in the early years we butchered, cleaned and put them into the deep freeze. We shared a beef and pork to put in our deepfreeze also. Having plenty of milk, cream, meat and vegetables, it was good food that we shared. It was hard work but together it lightened the load. Every Thanksgiving day, beet harvest was stopped as this was the day we dug the potatoes and carrots out of our garden and put them into the root cellar for the winter, then we enjoyed our turkey dinner. Ellen and Lavone had many friends that would socialize and have parties but gradually in their later years, it was mostly Jessie, George, Geneva and Slim who spent their evening’s playing cards. She always had cookies and punch available for these events. They would go on little trips together but in their retiring years, Ellen was very nervous in the car and very often would put her back out of place by pushing hard on the floor of the car from anxiety. Eventually Lavone retired from farming. Bruce often stopped into their home and watched TV with them. They loved to watch the game shows. Also, Lavone would go into Taber and lend a hand to Pat in her flower shop. He enjoyed the people that worked with her and felt good to help his daughter. He did this for quite a few years. However, eventually he became concerned about his wife as her health deteriorated and he spent a lot of time taking care of her. He did the laundry, ironing and even baked bread. They both preferred homemade bread. Finally it became too difficult for him to take care of her and she was put into the hospital. After George and Slim died, Geneva and Jessie would have a daily walk for exercise. Ellen was struggling with arthritis and had an enlarged heart so she was unable to participate. Finally Geneva moved up to Lethbridge with her sister Mable and Ellen felt deserted. Her appetite lessened, she became very thin, almost anorexic. Lavone was very good to her and did the best he could but she had to be hospitalized. Larry and Cathy came down to Taber to be with her. The last night, Catherine and I sat with her, doing what we could to make her comfortable. Then at 6:00 A.M. the nurses told us to leave as they were going to do the necessary care and we left as Larry and Bruce were going to come in and sit with her. Before we arrived in Barnwell, they phoned from the hospital and said she had passed away. It seemed that as long as the family was there she was not ready to pass on, only when we left. Bruce’s Dad seemed quite capable of living by himself. We would visit him and he was jolly and we often commented how good he was not to make us feel neglectful or guilty. He just seemed to be happy whenever anyone dropped in to see him. He always had a dish of candy to share with the little kids as they visited him. Gradually, we noticed that he was not eating well. Bruce often went over and ate breakfast with him. Pat arranged for Home Care to help him. I would send dinner over to him. He was put into the hospital for a short time and when he came home we had him move in with us. But one stormy Sunday he was not able to stand the noise of our grandchildren and he decided to go back to his own home. Eventually we could see he was showing signs of depression and the family urged him to move into the Lodge. He lasted one month only. We took him to Utah with us as he was always talking about it. I went shopping in a craft shop and was in there for quite some time. Bruce and his Dad were sitting in the car. His comment to everyone when we came home was, “We sat in the car on Main Street for a very long time and I didn’t see one person that I knew.” Lavone was a good driver but his eyesight and hearing became impaired in his later years and he was a hazard on the road. He drove into a semi trailer in Taber but he still didn’t think he needed to quit driving. It was only when Loren pulled the wires in his pickup that he no longer drove his vehicle. Bruce couldn’t bring himself to do it. When Bruce was ill in the hospital and Lavone came in with pneumonia the Doctor told him that he could no longer live alone at home and had to go into extended care. He was first put into the extended care in Lethbridge and Bruce would drive up there to get him to eat as he was quite depressed and unresponsive even though they were very good to him there. Eventually there was a place in Taber for him. They had to put him in the lock up area because he kept telling everyone that he was going to go to Provo and they were afraid that he would just up and leave on his own. Gradually he became happy and contented. His appetite increased and when we visited him he wanted to know where Bruce was. Bruce would say, “Well I’m Bruce.” He was forgetting who we were but knew we were familiar. He did well for being 96.

Ellen Johnson

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

Information gathered by her granddaughter Patty Jean and her daughter-in-law Ruth Ann Ellen was born in Winter Quarters, Utah. This was a small, temporary settlement for those who worked in the mines and eventually was deserted. Both her parents, John Peter Johnson and Solrum (Lula) Gudmundsdottir Johnson had moved to Utah from Iceland. There were twelve children in this family, Ellen being number eight. The oldest, Hannah, was a half sister who died at the young age of 27. She had three other siblings; William Johnston Johnson (1893-1895), Mary Florence Johnson (1899-1901), and Leonard Johnson (1901-1902) that died in their infancy before Ellen was even born. So in her lifetime she considered that there were eight in her family, namely Sina(1892-1958), Nathan(1895-1954), Annie (1897-), Ellen(1902-1985), Geneva(1905-), Lyman(1907-), Mabel(1910-) and Esther(1913-). When Ellen was three, the family left the United States and settled in Taber, Alberta. They lived in a four roomed house in the northwest part of Taber, north of the Court House. Sina was 10 years older than Ellen so she has no memories of her living at home and Annie, five years older than Ellen, left home to work. This left Ellen, Geneva, Esther and Mabel sharing one bedroom, making lasting ties that never severed. Her brother Lyman slept in the front room. Ellen’s Mother Lula was a friendly and outgoing person who visited her neighbours daily. She had worked at the ports in Iceland and could understand 4 or 5 languages. She spoke English but was not able to read it. As a family they joked that their mother had to say Good Morning and Good Night to her neighbours as she visited them daily. During High School Ellen did housework for other people to earn a little money. After she finished grade eleven she worked at the Bank of Hamilton (later became the Bank of Commerce) where a young clerk commented, “You are bound to learn as I have never known anyone to ask so many questions.” Her next employment was working as a court reporter in the sheriff’s office where she took dictation. Not having been trained in short-hand she wrote very fast but under one fellow he talked so fast she didn’t always get everything he said. She had very fond memories of those years of employment after High School. She was proud of the fact that she walked to and fro from her home to work, morning and afternoon. This helped to keep her slim. Tennis was also one of her favourite past times. She met Lavone Johnson at a dance. She went to the dance with Wayne Anderson and went home with Lavone. They dated two years before they were married December 11, 1929. He was 24 and she was 26. She still had the same surname as before. Ellen always told her grandchildren that they didn’t need to worry about getting married until they were at least as old as she had been. After they were married they moved to Barnwell where they lived with Lavone’s mother, Ida (Rozina), where he farmed her land. She became pregnant and at the time for delivery she went to her mother’s home to have the baby. Her mother had practiced midwifery for years and Dr. Hammond was available for this event. The birth was not an easy one; Ellen suffered several weeks following this event but the baby was a large and healthy boy. They named him Bruce Lavone Johnson, February 13, 1931. Soon after the birth of their son, they bought a small two-roomed house for $100. In October 13, 1934 Ellen had her second child. Once again she went to Taber to deliver her baby. Patricia Jean was born in Lula’s home. Bruce had a baby sister. This was the thirties, during the depression years and money was scarce. Fortunately these two children came into a home where their parents were resourceful and they never knew hunger. Ellen had the skills to make tasty meals out of the very basic ingredients that they grew. They had a milk cow in which to make butter and milk to drink. They had chickens for eggs and meat as well as a vegetable garden. Ellen canned fruit, meat and vegetables in season so they would have a variety throughout the year. The house did not have modern plumbing but they had a surface well next to their house which provided clean water. Often they would hang food down the well to keep it cool. Her wash water, which had to be carried in and carried out, was heated on the cook stove in a boiler every Monday morning. Monday was always washday and the rinse water was used to wipe up the kitchen floor. Water was never wasted. Initially laundry was done by hand on a scrub board but eventually they had a ringer washing machine and the clothes were hung out on a clothesline on the east side of the house. Although it was difficult to hang clothes out in the cold, the sheets always had a fresh smell that cannot be duplicated in an automatic washer and drier. It was a wonderful experience to crawl into a freshly made bed with those sheets that had been dried outside. Since doing laundry was a big chore, the women wore aprons to protect their house dresses which they would wear for several days. The men and boys did not change overalls daily, and often wore the same pair all week. In the days that water was carried in the Saturday night baths were done in the round rinse tub used for laundry. An outside privy was built a short way from the backdoor and a washstand often was close to the back door. On the washstand would be a bucket of drinking water with a dipper. The whole family drank water out of the dipper. Years later when they built on to their house a modern bathroom and a big entrance for their laundry facilities, Ellen continued to be careful and used water sparingly. They hauled water by the truck load and stored it in a cistern to accommodate the indoor plumbing and the gray water flowed into a septic field. Eventually the village of Barnwell had a water system which did away with the need for a cistern and septic fields. Lavone allowed the village to put the water treatment plant on his property with the agreement that he could have free water for his cattle. Ellen was a tidy homemaker, and a good cook. She made yummy homemade bread and if you were fortunate to visit as she was taking it out of the oven she would willingly share a slice with you. She was very hospitable and a visitor was often invited to have a taste of whatever she was cooking at the time. Ellen was particular in washing her dishes. She always had a tea kettle boiling on her stove in which she scalded her dishes before she dried them. Then she always put her glass tumblers upside down in the cupboard. This was a habit she acquired to keep the dust from collecting inside the glasses. Lavone milked several cows and sold milk and cream around the area. This required Ellen to wash milk bottles and the cream separator. It was crucial to be particular in cleanliness in this endeavour and she was extremely careful. Their third child was born 20 May, 1939. Catherine Olive Johnson was born in Lethbridge, Alberta in the hospital. This little girl cried and cried the first several months of her life. Lavone had put his back out of place and went to the Hutterite colony to a bone doctor for a treatment. The bone doctor saw little Cathy and immediately recognized that her hips were out of place. He gave her a treatment and that was the beginning of a happy existence for baby Catherine. Another convenience that was important to the family was the root cellar. This root cellar stored the carrots and potatoes they had grown in their vegetable garden. It filled their need throughout the winter months and until the next garden season. She also stored her bottled fruit in the cellar. She bottled many jams, jellies, fruit and vegetables to give variety to their meals. Eventually when the Co-op rented frozen storage lockers, peas and corn was frozen instead of bottled, but eventually they bought their own deep freezer and they filled it up with vegetables as well as chicken, beef and pork. Ellen was very resourceful with the means they had. Lavone was given an opportunity to buy a nice little farm in Picture Butte in 1940 and was eager to purchase it, but Ellen refused to budge. She was very attached to her siblings and did not want to be that far away. She was fiercely loyal to her extended family. They gathered together often, the children playing with their cousins and the sisters enjoyed each other’s company. Ellen also felt comfortable with her neighbours and not being adventurous, they remained in Barnwell. Lavone eventually bought his mother’s property but would occasionally mention the opportunity they had passed over, much to Ellen’s annoyance. Christmas was always an important event. When Ellen’s father unexpectantly passed away, he had purchased Christmas presents for the family members. It was a memorable Christmas. Christmas trees could be purchased for $1.00 and were lovingly decorated. They visited neighbours, singing and sharing food at each house. The children would wake up in the morning and Santa never failed to leave happy surprises. The Anderson’s, Sybil, Viola and Ervin, and Glen and Mable Howells lived across the road and were very neighbourly, in which they shared gifts. Bruce remembers receiving much attention from the Anderson sisters and really favoured Mable. Pat remembers sharing desserts from their kitchen table. Ellen and Geneva both sang in the ward choir and served in the Primary organization. One year only one little girl was in Ellen’s Primary class. Her name was Anita Jonnson. Ellen often had her come to her house to teach her the lesson which made this little girl feel special. 1949 was the year that Ellen’s sister Geneva moved next door. Slim sold his farm and began to work as the field man for the Canning Factory in Taber. They moved the house that had been the home of Rozina Johnson (Lavone’s mother) next door to Ellen and Lavone. These two sisters went everywhere together. If Ellen was going to Taber or Lethbridge, she would call Geneva and see if she needed to go as well. They both did their housework first thing in the morning and often had the afternoon to spend together, visiting and doing handwork. Geneva had far more confidence in her capabilities than Ellen and she was a source of strength for her. Anytime Ellen was canning, travelling, quilting, entertaining, or cooking for something special she always involved her sister. In the heat of the summer it was not unusual to see Ellen and Geneva sitting in the shade behind Ellen’s home. They rose early, completing their housework in the morning and rested in the shade on those very warm days. Monday morning was washday and seldom did anyone beat Geneva in getting her laundry out on the clothesline. A clean wash was a sign of a good housekeeper and sheets on the line at early dawn was a good sign that you were not lazy. Ellen was a conscientious housekeeper too, but she didn’t try to compete with Geneva. She loved her sister and loved having her live next door. It was a very sad day, years later, when Geneva became a widow and moved to Lethbridge to live with her sister Mable in a senior’s residence. Ellen had friends besides her neighbours that visited her regularly. Leona Harris who lived in Chin, often would drop in to visit. They both grew up in Taber. She had a son the same age as Bruce and they became good friends. Melvin Lebaron was also a good friend, and the three of them had many good times together. Both Gordon and Melvin appreciated Ellen and her hospitality. She was very warm towards her children’s friends and made them feel welcome. Francis Bullock was a happy, carefree woman that loved to come and share gossip. Ellen enjoyed her company because she was so outgoing, quite a contrast to her conservative nature. Myrl Jensen was a loyal and dear friend and together with their spouses they travelled a bit together. Einar loved to go to the rodeos but this really wasn’t a favourite activity for the Johnson’s but when Einar was the Bishop he had an influence in helping Lavone prepare himself to go to the temple when Bruce was married. Viola Anderson, Ervin Anderson and Mable Howells were regular afternoon visitors. When Lavone’s brother George moved to Barnwell from the Pass, his wife Jessie, a very outgoing personality, became very much part of Ellen’s friends. She was a happy, energetic person and she became fast friends with Ellen and Geneva. In fact, George and Jessie, Slim and Geneva and Ellen and Lavone were very much together in all their social activities. This filled a need for Ellen as she welcomed people into her home but she was timid in reaching out and hesitant to go places alone. She was comfortable when she had someone beside her to do the reaching out and Jessie and Geneva did this for her. As a mother, Ellen was always there for her children. Bruce remembers her teaching him the alphabet from his toy blocks before he went to school. Meals were cooked regularly and she catered to their needs. She lovingly encouraged her children to be good and to be kind to each other. She never raised her voice in anger to her children. All three children participated in sports and Ellen was proud of their achievements. Academically Bruce was quite easy-going, but after High School graduation he went to Tech in Calgary taking automotive mechanics, Pat went to Calgary and took a secretarial course, and Cathy took a year of Education as a school teacher. The skills they acquired were helpful in their adult years. Cathy went to Calgary to learn to be a school teacher and Larry Henry was working at the Hudson Bay Company as a box clerk and gradually worked his way up as manager. They were married August 28, 1958 and lived in Calgary, Banff, Prince George and Trail B.C., Medicine Hat and back to Calgary and eventually retired in Cochrane, Alberta. When Ellen and Lavone travelled to visit them they always brought produce from the garden or anything else she wanted to share with them. She was naturally very generous to those whom she loved and did so graciously. She had an interesting relationship with Larry. Ellen was very sensitive and so no one really tried to tease or joke with her in case it would hurt her feelings, but Larry never hesitated. Ellen worried over many things and could become very stressed at the possibility of something terrible happening, and Larry would laugh and say that no one else in the family needs to worry because Grandma does it all for everyone. He would tease her like no one else could, and she accepted it. Becoming a grandmother was a natural for Ellen. She had the capacity to love each and everyone that came into her family and they knew that she cared.

A Brief Sketch of John Peter Johnson

Colaborador: tfinney22 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 10 months ago

[This history was found in Bruce Lavone Johnson's files after he died. He was the grandson of John Peter Johnson.] John Peter Johnson was born in Iceland October 6th, 1866 and came to Spanish Fork, Utah in 1874. He was eight years old. He was baptized September 13th 1875 and confirmed a member of the Church the same day by Bro. John A. Lewis. He was active in the Church of Jesus Christ and was ordained as a High Priest by Bro. Hugh B. Brown on the 18 of June 1925 in Taber, Alberta. Solrum (Lula) Gudmundson was born in Iceland the 11 of October 1867. She was married in Iceland and her husband died climbing a mountain. She came to Spanish Fork in 1888 at the age of twenty-one where their first child was born. She later met John Peter Johnson and they were married in Provo, Utah, February 26th 1891. In 1903 they moved to Canada. On their way they stopped in Salt Lake City where they were sealed in the temple and had their eight children sealed to them. They came to Raymond, Alberta and stayed until 1905. One child, Geneva, was born while they lived in Raymond. Then they moved to Taber where three more children were born. When they first came to Taber they had a little farm which he later lost through signing a note for a friend. He later worked as an engineer and steam shovel operator for the Canada West Mine. His son Nathan worked along with him. He stayed there until the mine closed down. He was a counsellor for the Town of Taber for two years. He was a very pleasant person who was even-tempered and friendly. The children said they never saw their father angry. He was a very congenial person. His wife Lula was a great humanitarian, caring much for the sick and was known as a good cook. She was well-known for her home-made pies. They loved company and their home was always open to their friends. When the children were all grown, they took patients into their home as there wasn’t a hospital in Taber and Lula was a practical nurse and a mid-wife. Many babies were born in their home. Lula was on the burial committee before there were funeral services available. John loved his family and he had all their Christmas presents bought and wrapped before he died. He died ten days before Christmas, December 15, 1935. This was a sad Christmas. This couple were well thought of by their many friends. They loved to visit their neighbors. They kept their garden, fruit trees and home in order. They were not wealthy in material things but they were rich in friends and family. Many people remember them for their unselfishness and friendliness. Their posterity as of September 3rd, 1984 is as follows: 12 children 27 grandchildren 111 great grandchildren 74 great, great grandchildren.

Life timeline of Geneva Stevens

1905
Geneva Stevens was born in 1905
Geneva Stevens was 12 years old when Tsar Nicholas II of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule. Nicholas II or Nikolai II, known as Saint Nicholas in the Russian Orthodox Church, was the last Emperor of Russia, ruling from 1 November 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March 1917. His reign saw the fall of the Russian Empire from one of the foremost great powers of the world to economic and military collapse. He was given the nickname Nicholas the Bloody or Vile Nicholas by his political adversaries due to the Khodynka Tragedy, anti-Semitic pogroms, Bloody Sunday, the violent suppression of the 1905 Russian Revolution, the executions of political opponents, and his perceived responsibility for the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). Soviet historians portray Nicholas as a weak and incompetent leader whose decisions led to military defeats and the deaths of millions of his subjects.
Geneva Stevens was 23 years old when Walt Disney character Mickey Mouse premieres in his first cartoon, "Plane Crazy". Walter Elias Disney was an American entrepreneur, animator, voice actor and film producer. A pioneer of the American animation industry, he introduced several developments in the production of cartoons. As a film producer, Disney holds the record for most Academy Awards earned by an individual, having won 22 Oscars from 59 nominations. He was presented with two Golden Globe Special Achievement Awards and an Emmy Award, among other honors. Several of his films are included in the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress.
Geneva Stevens was 34 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
Geneva Stevens was 36 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany invades the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa. Nazi Germany is the common English name for Germany between 1933 and 1945, when Adolf Hitler and his Nazi Party (NSDAP) controlled the country through a dictatorship. Under Hitler's rule, Germany was transformed into a totalitarian state that controlled nearly all aspects of life via the Gleichschaltung legal process. The official name of the state was Deutsches Reich until 1943 and Großdeutsches Reich from 1943 to 1945. Nazi Germany is also known as the Third Reich, from German Drittes Reich, meaning "Third Realm" or "Third Empire", the first two being the Holy Roman Empire and the German Empire. The Nazi regime ended after the Allied Powers defeated Germany in May 1945, ending World War II in Europe.
Geneva Stevens was 50 years old when Disneyland Hotel opens to the public in Anaheim, California. The Disneyland Hotel is a resort hotel located at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, California, owned by the Walt Disney Company and operated through its Parks, Experiences and Consumer Products division. Opened on October 5, 1955, as a motor inn owned and operated by Jack Wrather under an agreement with Walt Disney, the hotel was the first to officially bear the Disney name. Under Wrather's ownership, the hotel underwent several expansions and renovations over the years before being acquired by Disney in 1988. The hotel was downsized to its present capacity in 1999 as part of the Disneyland Resort expansion.
Geneva Stevens was 59 years old when The Beatles make their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, performing before a "record-busting" audience of 73 million viewers across the USA. The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. With members John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, they became widely regarded as the foremost and most influential music band in history. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented with several musical styles, ranging from pop ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock, often incorporating classical elements and unconventional recording techniques in innovative ways. In 1963, their enormous popularity first emerged as "Beatlemania"; as the group's music grew in sophistication, led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the band were integral to pop music's evolution into an art form and to the development of the counterculture of the 1960s.
Geneva Stevens was 73 years old when Jim Jones led more than 900 members of the Peoples Temple to mass murder/suicide in Jonestown, Guyana, hours after some of its members assassinated U.S. Congressman Leo Ryan (pictured). James Warren Jones was an American religious cult leader who initiated and was responsible for a mass suicide and mass murder in Jonestown, Guyana. He considered Jesus Christ as being in compliance with an overarching belief in socialism as the correct social order. Jones was ordained as a Disciples of Christ pastor, and he achieved notoriety as the founder and leader of the Peoples Temple cult.
Geneva Stevens was 81 years old when Space Shuttle program: STS-51-L mission: Space Shuttle Challenger disintegrates after liftoff, killing all seven astronauts on board. The Space Shuttle program was the fourth human spaceflight program carried out by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which accomplished routine transportation for Earth-to-orbit crew and cargo from 1981 to 2011. Its official name, Space Transportation System (STS), was taken from a 1969 plan for a system of reusable spacecraft of which it was the only item funded for development.
Geneva Stevens was 85 years old when Nelson Mandela is released from Victor Verster Prison outside Cape Town, South Africa after 27 years as a political prisoner. Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was a South African anti-apartheid revolutionary, political leader, and philanthropist who served as President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999. He was the country's first black head of state and the first elected in a fully representative democratic election. His government focused on dismantling the legacy of apartheid by tackling institutionalised racism and fostering racial reconciliation. Ideologically an African nationalist and socialist, he served as President of the African National Congress (ANC) party from 1991 to 1997.
Geneva Stevens died in 2001 at the age of 96
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Geneva Stevens (1905 - 2001), BillionGraves Record 5399816 Taber, Division No. 2, Alberta, Canada

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