Harold R Barton

4 Feb 1910 - 28 Aug 1988

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Harold R Barton

4 Feb 1910 - 28 Aug 1988
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1 HAROLD R. BARTON Written by H. Keith Barton, his son. Harold R. Barton was born February 4, 1910 in Bluff, San Juan, Utah to Joseph Franklin Barton Jr. and Hattie Ellen Redd. When Harold was three years old, his family moved to Verdure, Utah, a few miles south of Monticello, Utah. They lived in Ve
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Life Information

Harold R Barton

Nasceu:
Morreu:

Wasatch Lawn Memorial Park

3401 South Highland Drive
Millcreek, Salt Lake, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Children: H. Keith Marolyn K. Ronald ? Nancy L.
Copista

Carolyn

August 26, 2013
Fotógrafo

Carolyn

August 16, 2013

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Harold R Barton by his son Keith

Colaborador: Carolyn Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

1 HAROLD R. BARTON Written by H. Keith Barton, his son. Harold R. Barton was born February 4, 1910 in Bluff, San Juan, Utah to Joseph Franklin Barton Jr. and Hattie Ellen Redd. When Harold was three years old, his family moved to Verdure, Utah, a few miles south of Monticello, Utah. They lived in Verdure until Harold was seven years old when they moved to Blanding, Utah. During the family's stay in Verdure, the settlement had several homes, a store, cheese factory, sheds, corrals and a Post Office. The Bartons built their own home there. In Blanding the family had sheep, pigs, cattle and hay on a farm south of town, which consisted of about 80 acres. This land was purchased and then sold or traded for land north of Blanding, just north of the cemetery. This property along with cattle and horses were sold when his father Frank was hurt in an accident at Long Canyon. Harold lived in Blanding until he was 14 years old, then started work on March 31, 1924 for his Uncle Charles Redd in LaSalle, Utah, in the ranch store and stacking hay 6 months a year at $20.00 a month. Then back to Blanding for the next 6 months to go to school. During his 6-month stays at home he fed cattle during the winter, milked cows and sold the cream. The cream checks were good and his main source of cash income. He did this until he went to school at the Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. During this time in Blanding, his parents were both active in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His mother, Hattie, held most all positions at on time or another. She worked extremely hard in Relief Society as she was called upon a lot for help. Harold ran many errands for her on his horse for the Church, such as someone being sick, etc. A call to Hattie would send Harold up to milk the cows; bring in the wood, or other chores. At this time he lost interest in the church as he was always being called upon and he felt the church members took advantage of his mothers good nature and generosity which oft times fell on his shoulder to carry out. He attended B.Y.U. for 4 years and graduated in Business. He met Lola Rosailia Braithwaite there and they married in the Salt Lake Temple. September 19, 1932. His years at the University are covered in more detail in the history following, as written by Marolyn, one of his daughters. After graduation and marriage he found employment in Manti, Utah as a schoolteacher for one year and then moved to Bingham Canyon, Utah to work for the Apex Mining Co. in Highland Boy as a bookkeeper in the office. The rest of this history is recorded from my memory. After my record is the history as remembered by my sisters, Marolyn and Nancy and excerpts from my brother Ronald's funeral talk. My earliest recollection of my father in Bingham Canyon, Utah, was when I was about 2 years old asking him which shoe went on my right foot and which one was my right foot. Then asking which foot the other shoe went on. I was too young to tie the laces and he did it for me. We lived in one of the company houses, which were quite close together. My father always worked hard to support his young family and spent many hours at the office. At times he would comment on his knee which was always bothering him with a lot of pain. I never knew what the problem was. When I was 5 or 6 years old he and his brother Wesley entered the Bingham Canyon Galena Days Parade. They had a pack mule loaded with camping gear. They would hold up the parade for about 2 blocks, and then run the mule fast as they could, build a fire in the middle of the street boil a pot of coffee, serve it to the crowd, do the dishes and pack up the mule before the rest of the parade caught up with them. They were the hit of the parade. At age 7 or 8 he asked if I would work with him to be Santa's helper and we worked at night in a small shop to build wooden toys for the other children for Christmas. I did the painting. I'm sure my contributions were very small, but he made me feel very important and that my work was really needed. Several months later he taught me to shoot a 22 rifle in 2 ways. One was to set up candles on some railroad tie cribbing and have me practice until I could shoot out the flame at 50 paces. The other was to tie a large juice tin can to a string and let it hang 15 to 20 feet below a beam from an old mill across the canyon from our home. He would swing it as hard as he could then run back to the house and have me shoot at the can while it was still swinging in the breeze. After many tries I finally started hitting the tin can. Shortly after this time, my Dad and I went into the rabbit raising business. We started with 2 rabbits and soon had up to 500 in several pens he had built. We would sell the meat to the local butcher and dry the hides on wire and sell them also. A few years later when 1 was 13, we moved to West Jordan, Utah where Dad worked for a contractor selling homes. We were there for 1 to 2 years and moved to LaSalle, Utah. In LaSalle He worked for his Uncle Charles Redd In the mercantile store. After this he worked in Monticello, Utah for his Uncle Charles Redd again. He over-saw the construction of an automobile dealership building. Both a showroom and repair shop. During that year, his wife Lola taught school in LaSalle and he would come home on the weekends. When the construction was completed, we moved to Monticello. We lived there 2 years where he was the General Manager of the Chevrolet/Buick business. Then it was a move to Moab, Utah where he worked for Butch Christensen as the Sales Manage in his Ford dealership. During this time he became active in the Church again and spent many hours reading and studying the gospel and taught the Elder Quorum and the Gospel Doctrine class in the Ward. In 1952 when I attended B.Y.U., both my father and mother were teaching school in Moab. He taught school until he retired when he and mother moved to Salt Lake City, Utah. He enjoyed raising a garden wherever they lived after leaving Bingham Canyon. During his retirement years he spent many summer days tending his garden and producing some of the best vegetables around. He was also a great hand at making peanut brittle and we always enjoyed his "special recipe" of brittle on special occasions. He was a loving husband to his wife, especially in her late years as she had Alzheimer’s disease. He suffered a heart attack that required a quadruple by-pass that left him with a lot of discomfort from the veins being taken from his leg in the groin area. Dad died August 28, 1988 from another heart attack and other old age problems. He was always proud of his four children and very interested in what they were doing and the kind of lives they were leading. He was always there to help whenever called upon by any of the children, even when they had families of their own. He spent his last several months' bed bound at his son Ronald's home in Salt Lake City. Nancy, Ronald, his wife Lorraine, Keith, my wife, Pat, and others would take time to be with him and stay with him day and night to help feed and take care of him and his needs. He was extremely grateful for the support he received.

Story of Harold R Barton hiring a man in Monticello

Colaborador: Carolyn Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Story of Harold hiring a parts man when he was Manager of a new car dealership in Monticello, Ut. Page 1 of 2.

Harold R Barton by his son Keith

Colaborador: megasis Created: 1 year ago Updated: 9 months ago

1 HAROLD R. BARTON Written by H. Keith Barton, his son. Harold R. Barton was born February 4, 1910 in Bluff, San Juan, Utah to Joseph Franklin Barton Jr. and Hattie Ellen Redd. When Harold was three years old, his family moved to Verdure, Utah, a few miles south of Monticello, Utah. They lived in Verdure until Harold was seven years old when they moved to Blanding, Utah. During the family's stay in Verdure, the settlement had several homes, a store, cheese factory, sheds, corrals and a Post Office. The Bartons built their own home there. In Blanding the family had sheep, pigs, cattle and hay on a farm south of town, which consisted of about 80 acres. This land was purchased and then sold or traded for land north of Blanding, just north of the cemetery. This property along with cattle and horses were sold when his father Frank was hurt in an accident at Long Canyon. Harold lived in Blanding until he was 14 years old, then started work on March 31, 1924 for his Uncle Charles Redd in LaSalle, Utah, in the ranch store and stacking hay 6 months a year at $20.00 a month. Then back to Blanding for the next 6 months to go to school. During his 6-month stays at home he fed cattle during the winter, milked cows and sold the cream. The cream checks were good and his main source of cash income. He did this until he went to school at the Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. During this time in Blanding, his parents were both active in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His mother, Hattie, held most all positions at on time or another. She worked extremely hard in Relief Society as she was called upon a lot for help. Harold ran many errands for her on his horse for the Church, such as someone being sick, etc. A call to Hattie would send Harold up to milk the cows; bring in the wood, or other chores. At this time he lost interest in the church as he was always being called upon and he felt the church members took advantage of his mothers good nature and generosity which oft times fell on his shoulder to carry out. He attended B.Y.U. for 4 years and graduated in Business. He met Lola Rosailia Braithwaite there and they married in the Salt Lake Temple. September 19, 1932. His years at the University are covered in more detail in the history following, as written by Marolyn, one of his daughters. After graduation and marriage he found employment in Manti, Utah as a schoolteacher for one year and then moved to Bingham Canyon, Utah to work for the Apex Mining Co. in Highland Boy as a bookkeeper in the office. The rest of this history is recorded from my memory. After my record is the history as remembered by my sisters, Marolyn and Nancy and excerpts from my brother Ronald's funeral talk. My earliest recollection of my father in Bingham Canyon, Utah, was when I was about 2 years old asking him which shoe went on my right foot and which one was my right foot. Then asking which foot the other shoe went on. I was too young to tie the laces and he did it for me. We lived in one of the company houses, which were quite close together. My father always worked hard to support his young family and spent many hours at the office. At times he would comment on his knee which was always bothering him with a lot of pain. I never knew what the problem was. When I was 5 or 6 years old he and his brother Wesley entered the Bingham Canyon Galena Days Parade. They had a pack mule loaded with camping gear. They would hold up the parade for about 2 blocks, and then run the mule fast as they could, build a fire in the middle of the street boil a pot of coffee, serve it to the crowd, do the dishes and pack up the mule before the rest of the parade caught up with them. They were the hit of the parade. At age 7 or 8 he asked if I would work with him to be Santa's helper and we worked at night in a small shop to build wooden toys for the other children for Christmas. I did the painting. I'm sure my contributions were very small, but he made me feel very important and that my work was really needed. Several months later he taught me to shoot a 22 rifle in 2 ways. One was to set up candles on some railroad tie cribbing and have me practice until I could shoot out the flame at 50 paces. The other was to tie a large juice tin can to a string and let it hang 15 to 20 feet below a beam from an old mill across the canyon from our home. He would swing it as hard as he could then run back to the house and have me shoot at the can while it was still swinging in the breeze. After many tries I finally started hitting the tin can. Shortly after this time, my Dad and I went into the rabbit raising business. We started with 2 rabbits and soon had up to 500 in several pens he had built. We would sell the meat to the local butcher and dry the hides on wire and sell them also. A few years later when 1 was 13, we moved to West Jordan, Utah where Dad worked for a contractor selling homes. We were there for 1 to 2 years and moved to LaSalle, Utah. In LaSalle He worked for his Uncle Charles Redd In the mercantile store. After this he worked in Monticello, Utah for his Uncle Charles Redd again. He over-saw the construction of an automobile dealership building. Both a showroom and repair shop. During that year, his wife Lola taught school in LaSalle and he would come home on the weekends. When the construction was completed, we moved to Monticello. We lived there 2 years where he was the General Manager of the Chevrolet/Buick business. Then it was a move to Moab, Utah where he worked for Butch Christensen as the Sales Manage in his Ford dealership. During this time he became active in the Church again and spent many hours reading and studying the gospel and taught the Elder Quorum and the Gospel Doctrine class in the Ward. In 1952 when I attended B.Y.U., both my father and mother were teaching school in Moab. He taught school until he retired when he and mother moved to Salt Lake City, Utah. He enjoyed raising a garden wherever they lived after leaving Bingham Canyon. During his retirement years he spent many summer days tending his garden and producing some of the best vegetables around. He was also a great hand at making peanut brittle and we always enjoyed his "special recipe" of brittle on special occasions. He was a loving husband to his wife, especially in her late years as she had Alzheimer’s disease. He suffered a heart attack that required a quadruple by-pass that left him with a lot of discomfort from the veins being taken from his leg in the groin area. Dad died August 28, 1988 from another heart attack and other old age problems. He was always proud of his four children and very interested in what they were doing and the kind of lives they were leading. He was always there to help whenever called upon by any of the children, even when they had families of their own. He spent his last several months' bed bound at his son Ronald's home in Salt Lake City. Nancy, Ronald, his wife Lorraine, Keith, my wife, Pat, and others would take time to be with him and stay with him day and night to help feed and take care of him and his needs. He was extremely grateful for the support he received.

Story of Harold R Barton hiring a man in Monticello

Colaborador: megasis Created: 1 year ago Updated: 9 months ago

Story of Harold hiring a parts man when he was Manager of a new car dealership in Monticello, Ut. Page 1 of 2.

Harold R Barton by his son Keith

Colaborador: nana2243 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 9 months ago

1 HAROLD R. BARTON Written by H. Keith Barton, his son. Harold R. Barton was born February 4, 1910 in Bluff, San Juan, Utah to Joseph Franklin Barton Jr. and Hattie Ellen Redd. When Harold was three years old, his family moved to Verdure, Utah, a few miles south of Monticello, Utah. They lived in Verdure until Harold was seven years old when they moved to Blanding, Utah. During the family's stay in Verdure, the settlement had several homes, a store, cheese factory, sheds, corrals and a Post Office. The Bartons built their own home there. In Blanding the family had sheep, pigs, cattle and hay on a farm south of town, which consisted of about 80 acres. This land was purchased and then sold or traded for land north of Blanding, just north of the cemetery. This property along with cattle and horses were sold when his father Frank was hurt in an accident at Long Canyon. Harold lived in Blanding until he was 14 years old, then started work on March 31, 1924 for his Uncle Charles Redd in LaSalle, Utah, in the ranch store and stacking hay 6 months a year at $20.00 a month. Then back to Blanding for the next 6 months to go to school. During his 6-month stays at home he fed cattle during the winter, milked cows and sold the cream. The cream checks were good and his main source of cash income. He did this until he went to school at the Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. During this time in Blanding, his parents were both active in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. His mother, Hattie, held most all positions at on time or another. She worked extremely hard in Relief Society as she was called upon a lot for help. Harold ran many errands for her on his horse for the Church, such as someone being sick, etc. A call to Hattie would send Harold up to milk the cows; bring in the wood, or other chores. At this time he lost interest in the church as he was always being called upon and he felt the church members took advantage of his mothers good nature and generosity which oft times fell on his shoulder to carry out. He attended B.Y.U. for 4 years and graduated in Business. He met Lola Rosailia Braithwaite there and they married in the Salt Lake Temple. September 19, 1932. His years at the University are covered in more detail in the history following, as written by Marolyn, one of his daughters. After graduation and marriage he found employment in Manti, Utah as a schoolteacher for one year and then moved to Bingham Canyon, Utah to work for the Apex Mining Co. in Highland Boy as a bookkeeper in the office. The rest of this history is recorded from my memory. After my record is the history as remembered by my sisters, Marolyn and Nancy and excerpts from my brother Ronald's funeral talk. My earliest recollection of my father in Bingham Canyon, Utah, was when I was about 2 years old asking him which shoe went on my right foot and which one was my right foot. Then asking which foot the other shoe went on. I was too young to tie the laces and he did it for me. We lived in one of the company houses, which were quite close together. My father always worked hard to support his young family and spent many hours at the office. At times he would comment on his knee which was always bothering him with a lot of pain. I never knew what the problem was. When I was 5 or 6 years old he and his brother Wesley entered the Bingham Canyon Galena Days Parade. They had a pack mule loaded with camping gear. They would hold up the parade for about 2 blocks, and then run the mule fast as they could, build a fire in the middle of the street boil a pot of coffee, serve it to the crowd, do the dishes and pack up the mule before the rest of the parade caught up with them. They were the hit of the parade. At age 7 or 8 he asked if I would work with him to be Santa's helper and we worked at night in a small shop to build wooden toys for the other children for Christmas. I did the painting. I'm sure my contributions were very small, but he made me feel very important and that my work was really needed. Several months later he taught me to shoot a 22 rifle in 2 ways. One was to set up candles on some railroad tie cribbing and have me practice until I could shoot out the flame at 50 paces. The other was to tie a large juice tin can to a string and let it hang 15 to 20 feet below a beam from an old mill across the canyon from our home. He would swing it as hard as he could then run back to the house and have me shoot at the can while it was still swinging in the breeze. After many tries I finally started hitting the tin can. Shortly after this time, my Dad and I went into the rabbit raising business. We started with 2 rabbits and soon had up to 500 in several pens he had built. We would sell the meat to the local butcher and dry the hides on wire and sell them also. A few years later when 1 was 13, we moved to West Jordan, Utah where Dad worked for a contractor selling homes. We were there for 1 to 2 years and moved to LaSalle, Utah. In LaSalle He worked for his Uncle Charles Redd In the mercantile store. After this he worked in Monticello, Utah for his Uncle Charles Redd again. He over-saw the construction of an automobile dealership building. Both a showroom and repair shop. During that year, his wife Lola taught school in LaSalle and he would come home on the weekends. When the construction was completed, we moved to Monticello. We lived there 2 years where he was the General Manager of the Chevrolet/Buick business. Then it was a move to Moab, Utah where he worked for Butch Christensen as the Sales Manage in his Ford dealership. During this time he became active in the Church again and spent many hours reading and studying the gospel and taught the Elder Quorum and the Gospel Doctrine class in the Ward. In 1952 when I attended B.Y.U., both my father and mother were teaching school in Moab. He taught school until he retired when he and mother moved to Salt Lake City, Utah. He enjoyed raising a garden wherever they lived after leaving Bingham Canyon. During his retirement years he spent many summer days tending his garden and producing some of the best vegetables around. He was also a great hand at making peanut brittle and we always enjoyed his "special recipe" of brittle on special occasions. He was a loving husband to his wife, especially in her late years as she had Alzheimer’s disease. He suffered a heart attack that required a quadruple by-pass that left him with a lot of discomfort from the veins being taken from his leg in the groin area. Dad died August 28, 1988 from another heart attack and other old age problems. He was always proud of his four children and very interested in what they were doing and the kind of lives they were leading. He was always there to help whenever called upon by any of the children, even when they had families of their own. He spent his last several months' bed bound at his son Ronald's home in Salt Lake City. Nancy, Ronald, his wife Lorraine, Keith, my wife, Pat, and others would take time to be with him and stay with him day and night to help feed and take care of him and his needs. He was extremely grateful for the support he received.

Story of Harold R Barton hiring a man in Monticello

Colaborador: nana2243 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 9 months ago

Story of Harold hiring a parts man when he was Manager of a new car dealership in Monticello, Ut. Page 1 of 2.

Life timeline of Harold R Barton

1910
Harold R Barton was born on 4 Feb 1910
Harold R Barton was 20 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
1929
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Harold R Barton was 30 years old when World War II: Nazi Germany and Slovakia invade Poland, beginning the European phase of World War II. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1939
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Harold R Barton was 30 years old when The Holocaust: The first prisoners arrive at a new concentration camp at Auschwitz. The Holocaust, also referred to as the Shoah, was a genocide during World War II in which Nazi Germany, aided by its collaborators, systematically murdered some six million European Jews, around two-thirds of the Jewish population of Europe, between 1941 and 1945. Jews were targeted for extermination as part of a larger event involving the persecution and murder of other groups, including in particular the Roma and "incurably sick", as well as ethnic Poles and other Slavs, Soviet citizens, Soviet prisoners of war, political opponents, gay men and Jehovah's Witnesses, resulting in up to 17 million deaths overall.
1940
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Harold R Barton was 43 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
1953
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Harold R Barton was 54 years old when The Beatles make their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, performing before a "record-busting" audience of 73 million viewers across the USA. The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. With members John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, they became widely regarded as the foremost and most influential music band in history. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later experimented with several musical styles, ranging from pop ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock, often incorporating classical elements and unconventional recording techniques in innovative ways. In 1963, their enormous popularity first emerged as "Beatlemania"; as the group's music grew in sophistication, led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the band were integral to pop music's evolution into an art form and to the development of the counterculture of the 1960s.
1964
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Harold R Barton was 63 years old when Vietnam War: The last United States combat soldiers leave South Vietnam. The Vietnam War, also known as the Second Indochina War, and in Vietnam as the Resistance War Against America or simply the American War, was a conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955 to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975. It was the second of the Indochina Wars and was officially fought between North Vietnam and the government of South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese army was supported by the Soviet Union, China, and other communist allies; the South Vietnamese army was supported by the United States, South Korea, Australia, Thailand and other anti-communist allies. The war is considered a Cold War-era proxy war by some US perspectives. The majority of Americans believe the war was unjustified. The war would last roughly 19 years and would also form the Laotian Civil War as well as the Cambodian Civil War, which also saw all three countries become communist states in 1975.
1973
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Harold R Barton died on 28 Aug 1988 at the age of 78
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Harold R Barton (4 Feb 1910 - 28 Aug 1988), BillionGraves Record 4896898 Millcreek, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

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