James Downs

14 Jul 1815 - 1 Jan 1882

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James Downs

14 Jul 1815 - 1 Jan 1882
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Autobiography of James Downs The following is taken from the “RECORD BOOK of JAMES DOWNS.” “I was born in Harrison County, Indiana, July 14th in the year of our Lord 1815, son of Ezekiel Downs and Charlottea daughter of Charles Rawlins. My great grandfather, Zachariah Downs, emigrated from Sco
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Life Information

James Downs

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Smithfield City Cemetery

376-424 E Center St
Smithfield, Cache, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

PIONEERS 1850
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jhrusk

June 2, 2012
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doclouie

May 3, 2012

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James Downs Autobiography

Colaborador: jhrusk Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Autobiography of James Downs The following is taken from the “RECORD BOOK of JAMES DOWNS.” “I was born in Harrison County, Indiana, July 14th in the year of our Lord 1815, son of Ezekiel Downs and Charlottea daughter of Charles Rawlins. My great grandfather, Zachariah Downs, emigrated from Scotland to North Carolina before the War of Independence. Being an elderly man and owning a grist mill he was exempt from service. My grandfather, Thomas, enlisted in his 17th year and served during the War and marched in the hot sand ‘till his feet bled, and dipped water in his hat as he marched along and gave to the wounded soldiers. He enlisted under General McDowel and fought under Washington. “My father was uneven tempered, rather the extreme both ways. My mother was even tempered, kind, affectionate. They were well respected by their neighbors. They labored and made a good living. “We emigrated to Illinois in the fall of ‘28 and settled in Adams County in the spring of ‘29, 12 miles below Quincy one of the most beautiful countries I ever saw. The land was very rich, the prairies interspersed with beautiful groves of timber with singing birds and the country abounded with wild game, wild fruit, fish, and honey. “My father bought calves and raised for market, bought land, fenced 160 acres, broke 100 acres and raised large crops of corn, wheat, oats, beans, potatoes, pumpkins, melons, and raised hogs for market. “And in the spring of ‘38 the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was driven from Missouri. The main body crossed at Quincy and some at Hannibal. Five families came to our place with one old wagon and a poor span of horses. We looked upon them as a poor persecuted people, took them in, gave them work and helped to feed and clothe them. They began to predict that I would become a Mormon. I laughed at the idea, but when I heard the Elders set forth the first principles of the gospel I received it with joy, the first one of the family. “I was baptized in October 1840 by Bishop David Evans and confirmed and had many manifestations of the truth of what I had received from time to time. “In a short time after that I went to West Virginia with my sister [Amy Emily] and brother-in-law, Absalom Smith, and spent the winter with his relations and taught school two months. Bought dried fruit, 120 bushels, and returned in the spring and raised a crop. And in the fall Brother Isaac M. Stewart married my sister [Matilta Jane] and Elder Hyde was sent from Nauvoo to council us to swap farms with the anti-Mormons in Hancock County and gather. (In the summer of ‘42 I was ordained a Priest by Jacob Myers.) I moved up and lived with them in Noltums Settlement 12 miles below Nauvoo. By this time my mother, father, and 3 sisters had joined the Church. This was in the Spring of ‘44 and in the month of June I had been down to my fathers and as I was returning home I saw a body of armed men in a little town called Lima and supposed it was training day, but was soon informed that it was a mob gathering to make an attack on Father Morley’s settlement that night about 3 miles distant, but before I reached the settlement I saw a black cloud rising in the northwest. I increased my speed and reached a house just as the storm set in. It blowed down fences, uprooted trees, and the rain fell in torrents, and the next morning the road was so filled with timber I had to pick my way through the woods. I speak of this children, that you may see that the Lord chose the storm to save his people, for the mob had laid their plans to an attack on all the settlements, as well as Nauvoo. When I got home I was told that all the able bodied men was called to Nauvoo. I went up with my old shotgun to see what was wanted. The Prophet rode along the ranks and saw some of the boys barefooted, and he rode to some shoe shops and told them to let the boys have shoes and he would foot the bill, but he was pressed upon by his enemies, backed up by apostates, that he fled to Montrose across the river with the intention of making his way to the Rocky Mountains, but his wife Emy sent for him to come back and save the people. He then said he would give himself up and die for his brethren and sisters, and as he went to Carthage Jail he said he was going like a Lamb to the slaughter. “I can not describe the scene that followed. Mobs marched through the country. I told the brethren that if we did not raise men and take them out of prison that they would be slaughtered. And when the word came, I went to the woods to pray to know who was to lead the Church, and when I rose a still small voice whispered to me “Brigham Young” and that gave me comfort. “The heavens seemed to weep over the horrible deed, for it rained so much that it drowned the crops, and all nature seemed to wear a gloom. In the Spring of ‘45 we swapped farms with Eli D. Walker 4 miles east of Warsaw. Ours was the best but he wanted boot and said he would not trade and started off, and I went to the woods and prayed that he might change his mind and return and trade with us. When I got to the house he rode up and said he would trade. “My father moved up and put in a crop, and in the summer the mob began to haul a wagon load of armed men past my father’s door and fired their guns and yelled like demons, and early in the fall old Co. Williams, a Baptist Preacher, raised 60 men, camped in the woods 2 miles from my father’s place, and commenced burning houses. He sent out 12 men, armed with a bottle of whiskey in each pocket, with orders to the Mormons to take their sick folks and leave. We done so, and let them burn. It was a frame [house], painted, and done off in good style with four good rooms and cost about $800 where labor was very cheap. We sold the farm for $1,133, less than half its worth, and glad to get that to make an outfit to leave such civilization. “The Prophet Joseph Smith appeared to my Father in a dream and said to him, “Follow me.” He followed him some distance up a hill and came to a beautiful little stream of water. “Now,” he said, “Stoop down and let me wash your face.” He did so, then he said again, “Follow me.” He went on a piece but the mountain was so steep he got tired and stopped. “He [my father, Ezekiel] departed this life at Council Bluffs, in his 70th year, I think. “In the forepart of the winter of ‘45 I dreamed that I was standing in Nauvoo, and I saw the Saints crossing the river to go west and others fitting up for the journey, and a council of Elders was called to transact some business. Then I stood near the Temple and saw a battle fought with the mob. Then I traveled west with the main body of the Church a long distance to a large body of water. There we stopped, raised crops, feasted, thanked and praised the Lord for our deliverance --all of which I have seen fulfilled. “In the Spring of ‘46 I started with the main body of the Church and my father, mother, brothers and three sisters. We all stopped at Council Bluffs to winter when 500 men were called to leave their families to go to fight Mexico. I wanted to go, but my mother was sick and thought she would never see me again if I did. “Here I married in the spring of ‘47 (Mary Ann Greathouse), and in the spring of ’50 started to Salt Lake with 2 children, and reached there September 15th, 1850. “Since that time I have passed through many scenes of afflictions, joy and sorrow. Since the year ’51 I have made three farms and planted two orchards. “I first settled at Mill Creek, Salt Lake County, where I remained 5 years, sold out, and moved to Lehi, stayed 5 years and then moved to Cache Valley, Smithfield, and have been trying to make a permanent home 10 years, but time passes on like a river that bears us on to the Ocean of Eternity.” Dream recorded in record of James Downs: “At Lehi, in the spring of 1859, I dreamed I saw two great Eagles meet in the air. One from the south and one from the north, backed up by vast armies of men. They fought a terrible battle then the one from the south retreated south followed by the other. The worst of battles and a sight so terrible that the beasts and creeping things fled and hid, and I saw spiders run in their holes.”

James Downs

Colaborador: jhrusk Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

James Downs James Downs was born in Harrison County, Indiana, July 14, 1815, son of Ezekiel Downs and Charlotte Rawlins. The family moved to Illinois in 1829 and lived in Adams County. He worked with his father on their farm until 1840. He wrote in his diary of the experiences of the Latter-day Saints at Nauvoo. In 1846 he, along with his parents and all of his brothers and sisters, except brother Asa, started west with the main body of saints. They stopped at Council Bluffs for the winter. Here he met his wife Mary Ann Greathouse. They were married in the spring of 1847. In the year of 1850 more than eight hundred wagons carrying Latter-day Saint converts and their belongings crossed the plains to Utah. They left from Council Bluffs (Kanesville), Iowa. James and Mary Ann and two children were among those who came to Utah in 1850. They arrived in Utah on September 15, 1850. Two days after arriving in the Salt Lake Valley a daughter, Charlotte, was born. We don’t know what company they came with. Many independent companies came that year. James and Mary Ann settled in the Millcreek (Draper), Utah, area. In June of 1852, two hundred forty-five converts left Council Bluffs (Kanesville), Iowa, under the direction of Captain Issac M. Stewart (husband of Matilda Jane Downs). Included in this company was James’ mother, Charlotte Rawlins Downs, and her children: Matilda Jane Downs and husband Issac M. Stewart, and their family; Amy Emily Downs and husband, Absalom Walmsley Smith, and their family; Susanna Downs; and Sidney Beckworth Downs. They settled in Millcreek, Utah. Sidney Downs later returned to his father in Downsville, Iowa. James and Mary Ann stayed in the Millcreek area for five years, then moved on to Lehi, Utah County, Utah, for another five years. James and Mary Ann then moved to Smithfield, Utah, in the spring of 1860 when Smithfield was first being settled. As pioneers they camped on the banks of Summit Creek. Later when the fort was made, their home was at the southwest part of the fort. They lived in the Smithfield Fort from 1860-1863. When they were free to move out of the fort, their home was just out of the fort line to the south. Their property was on the northeast corner of the intersection at 1st South and 3rd West. After moving to Utah, they had nine more children for a total of eleven children. They were: Naomi Jane, Lorena Ann, Mary Charlotte, James Alma, Susan Ellen, Margaret Emily, Deseret, Lucina, Printha Olive, Joseph Ephraim and William Seamore. In Smithfield, James farmed for a living. He understood the budding of trees, so he raised the trees for most of the first orchards in Smithfield. He was a faithful Latter-day Saint. He carried his Book of Mormon to the fields so that he could read while he and his horses rested. He was a kind father and husband. James finally stayed in one place for twenty years. He died January 1, 1882, in Smithfield, Utah. In researching early records of Smithfield, we find James Downs’ name listed as participating in various community and church activities. * James Downs labored on side hill of the Logan-Richmond canal. He contributed work for 48 feet 8 inches. Valued at $45. * Another time, worked on side hill by hand, valued at $3.25 * Worked on canal, “Labor done on canal by those owning land inside the fence.” * James Downs had 48 acres, taxed at $21.60, amount worked valued at $3.25, amount due $18.35 * James Downs listed with church group, 5 May 1861 * Voluntary Subscription in butter to assist to pay for ward flag. James Downs, one pound of butter. * James Downs donated one bushel of oats to assist in building a grist mill in Fillmore City, October 21, 1866. * 1867, donation for oil for lamps, James Downs, 18 pounds of oats. “This is to replace oil borrowed from Bishop for use in the meeting house.” * Received from James Downs [possibly for tithing]: $8.00 and 60 pounds of wheat, valued at $2.00 * List of names belonging to the School of the Prophets up to December 26, 1868. James Downs name was included in the list. * Donation for emigration, June 22, 1872. James Downs, $4.50. * Donation for I. S. Brown, James Downs 45 pounds of wheat. James’ sister, Susanne, was married to John Glover Smith. He was the first bishop of Summit Creek which was renamed Smithfield in his honor.

HISTORY OF MARY CHARLOTTE DOWNS LAUDER

Colaborador: jhrusk Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

HISTORY OF MARY CHARLOTTE DOWNS LAUDER Written by Marva S. Jenson a granddaughter Mary Charlotte Downs was born at Millcreek, Utah September 17, 1850. This was just two days after her parents; James Downs and Mary Ann Greathouse Downs arrived in Utah. The family lived at Millcreek for a short time, and then moved to Lehi. In the spring of 1860 they moved to Smithfield. They lived in the old fort, which was built for protection from the Indians. At that time there were 20 families living in the fort. Her uncle John G. Smith was the first bishop of Smithfield. The town was named in his honor. Charlotte was of short stature and had black hair. She learned to spin yarn and worked spinning for others. She could spin five skeins each day and was often given more than the regular wage because she did her work so well. She also worked in the fields gleaning wheat. Her father made the family’s shoes from leather that was tanned by the Meikle Brothers. The girl's best dresses for summer were made from calico, which was purchased from Salt Lake City for 50 cents per yard. Their winter dresses were made of homespun linsey, which they made from the raw wool they dyed themselves. The flower of Rabbit Brush was used for yellow color and Tag Alder bark for black. They used Madder root for red and Indigo from Salt Lake City to color material blue.. Charlotte remembered the Indians being cruel and strict with their own people. One time a squaw ran away with another buck. Her tribe found her and brought her back. For punishment she was tied by her hair to the horses tail and dragged through the streets until she was dead. The only fruits the family had for several years were the wild currents and berries that they found. Her father understood the budding of trees and supplied the trees for the first orchards in Smithfield. They used white clay from the river to cover their walls until they could get lime to make white wash. She often accompanied her mother as she treated the sick folks. Her mother was known as the first doctor in Smithfield. She married James Lauder in Dec 9, 1872 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Team and wagon made the trip to Salt Lake. On October 15, 1897 as her husband was returning home from a political rally, he died from a heart attack as he entered their home. Their home was at 1st South and 3rd West in Smithfield. It was a very modest house. Her widowed years were hard. She and her children did the janitor work at the school building to help earn their living. They worked in the fields weeding and harvesting. Charlotte and her sister Lorena were very diligent in exercising their right to vote. They always went to the polls together. One voted straight Republican and the other straight Democratic. Charlotte and James were the parents of six children. The two oldest girls, Louisa and Mary Ann, both died in infancy. The other children were Lenora, who married Thomas Peterson; James Moon, whose wife was Edith Bingham; Talula, who married Charles Webb and Georgena, whose husband was William Alfred Sorensen. After her children were all married and moved away from Utah, except her youngest daughter Georgena, Charlotte sold her home and bought another small home across the street from Georgena. She lived there until about 1930. When she became unable to live alone, she lived in two rooms of Georgena's home. She died October 20, 1932 at Smithfield. She was buried in the Smithfield City Cemetery.

Taken from "People of Draper 1849 --1924"

Colaborador: jhrusk Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

JAMES DOWNS (Brother of Amy Downs) JAMES DOWNS was born in Harrison County, Indiana, on 14 July 1815, a son of Ezekiel Downs and Charlotte Rawlins. His great-grandfather, Zachariah Downs, emigrated from Scotland to North Carolina before the War of Independence. Being an elderly man and owning a grist mill he was exempted from service. James' grandfather, Thomas Downs, enlisted in his seventeenth year, served during the war, and marched in the hot sand until his feet bled. He dipped water in his hat as he marched along and gave to the wounded soldiers. He enlisted under General McDowel and fought under George Washington. Ezekiel moved his family in the fall of 1818 to Illinois and settled in Adams Counyt. In the spring of 1829 they located twelve miles below Quincy, in one of the most beautiful areas they had ever seen. The country abounded with groves of timber and with singing birds. The country abounded with wild game, fish, and wild fruit and honey. Ezekiel purchased and fenced 160 acres, broke 100 acres out for farming, raised corn, Wheat, potatoes, pumpkins, melons, and raised hogs for the market. In the spring of 1830 members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints were driven from Missouri and the main body crossed at Quincy and some at Hannibal. Five families came to our place with one old wagon and a poor span of horses. They were a poor, persecuted people and we took them in and gave them work and helped to feed and clothe them. They began to predict that James would be a Mormon. He laughed at the ides, but when he heard the elders set forth the first principles of the Gospel he received it with joy, the first one of the family to do so. James was baptized in October 1840 by Bishop David Evans and confirmed a member. Following baptism he received from time to time manifestations of the truthfulness of what he had received. Shortly thereafter he went to West Virginia with his sister, Amy, and brother-in-law, Absalom W. Smith, and spent the winter with his relatives. He taught school for two months, bought 130 bushels of dried fruit , and returned in the spring to raise crops on his farm. That fall, Isaac M. Stewart married James'sister, Matilda Jane. James saw his parents and three sisters join the Church in the spring of 1844. He saw the lives of Saints in Lima, Illinois, spared when a terrible rain and wind storm came up and stopped the mob from attacking Lima, Nauvoo, and other Mormon settlements. He mentions this so his children may see that the Lord sent the storm to save many of His people. James went through the mob actions that eventually resulted in the martyrdom of Joseph Smith the prophet and his brother Hyrum at Carthage Jail. He wrote, "The heavens seemed to weep over the horrible deed, for it rained so hard that it drowned the crops and all Nauvoo seemed to wear a gloom,' In the spring of 1846, James started with the main body of the Church and his father, mother, brother and three sisters, and we all stopped at Council Bluffs to winter. While there, 500 men were called to leave their families and go to fight Mexico. I wanted to go, but my mother was sick and she thought she would never see me again if I did. Here James marries Mary Ann Greathouse in the spring of 1847 and, in the spring of 1850, started for Salt Lake with his wife and two children. they arrives in Salt Lake in September 1850, and since that time we have passed through many scenes of affliction, joy, and sorrow. Since the year 1851 James has made three farms and planted three orchards, first locating at Willow Creek (now Draper). in Salt Lake county, and five years later he sod out and moved to Lehi in Utah County, stayed there five years, and then moved to Cache Valley, where he tried for ten years to make his present home. James Downs dies in Cache County, Utah. ---Unknown- Taken from "People of Draper 1849 --1924"

Life timeline of James Downs

1815
James Downs was born on 14 Jul 1815
James Downs was 10 years old when The Erie Canal opens: Passage from Albany, New York to Lake Erie. The Erie Canal is a canal in New York, United States that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System. Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.
James Downs was 16 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
James Downs was 25 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
James Downs was 44 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
James Downs was 45 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
James Downs was 62 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
James Downs died on 1 Jan 1882 at the age of 66
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Grave record for James Downs (14 Jul 1815 - 1 Jan 1882), BillionGraves Record 1316290 Smithfield, Cache, Utah, United States

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