John T. Lazenby

8 Oct 1836 - 6 Apr 1915

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John T. Lazenby

8 Oct 1836 - 6 Apr 1915
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John Thomas Lazenby Life Story 1836 - 1915 A Short Story of My Father’s Life Written and compiled by Moroni Lazenby, Hoping that it will aid to perpetrate his memory for his descendants. John Thomas Lazenby was the son of John Thomas Lazenby and Maria Bean. Born October 8, 1836 at Dixon Square, Fe
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Life Information

John T. Lazenby

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Loa Cemetery

Unnamed Rd
Loa, Wayne, Utah
United States
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toooldtohunt

May 31, 2013
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May 16, 2013

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John T. Lazenby is buried in the Loa Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Loa Cemetery

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Unnamed Rd
Loa,Wayne,Utah
United States
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John Thomas Lazenby/Mary Ann Elizabeth Tether

Colaborador: toooldtohunt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

John Thomas Lazenby Life Story 1836 - 1915 A Short Story of My Father’s Life Written and compiled by Moroni Lazenby, Hoping that it will aid to perpetrate his memory for his descendants. John Thomas Lazenby was the son of John Thomas Lazenby and Maria Bean. Born October 8, 1836 at Dixon Square, Fetters Lane, off Market Place, Hull, England. His father was a green grocer, or market gardener, and had a stand in Hull market place, near King William’s Monument. This is a statue of a man on horseback, larger than life size, made of bronze, standing on a pedestal some 12 feet high. It is on a foundation having five steps, the man and horse are covered with gold leaf which is renewed every four or five years. As a boy, Father attended school in Vickers Lane until he was 12 years of age when he left school to help his father care for his business, but continued to go to night school, until he acquired a fair education, excelling both in mathematics and penmanship. When he was 17 years old he hired out as groom to a gentleman named Dr. Dudley at Paterington, a market place 15 miles east of Hull, and remained with him two years. He then went to live with Parson Inman at Skefling; while there, he had to take a Rev. Wilson from Easington to Kidness to preach three times each year, as required by law. From here on I copy from Father’s own account as he has left it on record. He says: “The first time I took the Rev. Mr. Wilson, we stayed at a Mr. Tennizscon’s where I put up my horse and drank a glass of beer with him until the church let out. The second time I was invited to attend the service, which was held in a school house upon or near the cliffs, a woman and myself constituted the congregation that time. On my third trip, I was again invited into church, and the same congregation was present with the exception of the woman; both times the whole form of the Church of England ritual was gone through, I being the only listener this time. The Rev. Wilson and the clerk were the only other occupants of the room. I remained with Mr. Dudley one year then went to live at Salby Grance back in Hull. I worked ten years for Mr. George Ashton as teamster. Our main work was attending upon the Gainsboror and York steamers. On July 25, 1867, I went on the steamer express to take the agency of the Gool line of steamers, being her Majesty and Empress, Zainsboro steamers this was called the Harlequen Colenbine. I married Sarah Ann Hubbard, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Hubbard, in August 1863, at the St. Stevens Church of England. Two little boys came to bless our home; we named them Walter [Hubbard], born March 21, 1865, and William, born on May 15, 1864 (and died the same day). Walter’s grandmother took him and kept him for the next two years. My wife was 20 years old and died from consumption at Hull, May 4, 1866.” John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 2 “[Sarah Ann] was buried at the General Cemetery Spring Bank Hull on the North side of the North Path (a headstone of sandstone [is] in a foundation rock at the head of the Grave) with my Aunt Ann Bean Sinnot and Sarah Ann’s sister Mary Ann Hubbard in the same grave; and my Father’s grave [is] near. All of their names are on the same headstone Wich [which] is 6 ft high.” “After she died, I used to go to the cemetery every Sunday and spend most of the day there until November when the weather began to be too cold and damp, then I thought I would go to meeting again, but now the service seemed to be empty and poor, and I could not take interest in the services any more. One day I saw the notice in a newspaper that the Latter-day Saints were holding meeting, so I went to visit them to see what they had; at the first meeting, I found something more to my liking and I soon applied for baptism. Sarah Ann Hubbard I was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ, Sunday morning, November 18, 1866 by Elder Robert Williams at the Stone Ferry baths, and confirmed the same day by Elder Robert Williams assisted by W. H. Scott and F. Craycroft. I was ordained a Priest by Elder Williams and appointed to be a teacher in the branch on January 6, 1867. On January 13, I preached in the Albert Room, and on January 26, 1867 I attended my first Priesthood meeting. It being fast day, I preached at the base of King William’s Monument, Market Place Hull. On May 19, 1867, in company with Wm. Scott, then traveling Elder, I was appointed to my first mission, and it was preaching in the street which was a great trial to me. I had four brothers and one sister; they were Henry, Edward, William, Charles, and Annie who married a Spain. Before I joined the Church, I was a member of the Weslian Methodist Society for eight years, an Oddfellow of the Manchester Unity for ten years and a member of the young Mens Literary and Christian Association at Hull. About the first part of January 1867, I dreamed there would be no emigration that year but there would be a large one in 1868 and that I should go to Zion. I told my dream to President Williams, then I learned for the first time about the emigration of the Saints to Utah, but he said there was nothing to my dream as there was always an emigration every year. But on the Tuesday following, as I carried the freight of the Gainsburrow along the pier to the wagon, President Williams met me and said there was a letter in the Star from President Young telling the Saints not to come to Zion in ’67 as the railroad was being built across the western plains and that if they would wait until ’68 he could send many more teams and wagons the shorter distance and then bring all who had a desire to come. When I told my mother that I had joined the Mormon church, she felt very badly about it, thinking that I had not only disgraced myself but had brought a great disgrace upon the family. She pleaded with me to reconsider and not disgrace them all by going with those ‘low Mormons’. I tried to show her the truth about the church, but she would not listen and the whole family felt that I had done an awful thing, and I was no longer welcome at home. In July ’67, I was eating my lunch in the storm boat’s little office about (7 by 9) close by the edge of the dock, when the mooring rope of the Gool Steamer, Express, jerked one of the foundation blocks out of place. I called the sailors up to fix it. Captain Wright asked me to come and eat dinner in the boat cabin. He then told me he had chosen me to be their agent at Hull and took me that day to Gool to meet the directors of the company. That evening I obtained the appointment, and so the Lord opened the way for the fulfillment of the dream I had in January, six months before. For this I have been thankful to this day. I was appointed Presiding Teacher over District Number Three, and in February ’67 was ordained an Elder under the hands of Elder John Jackson, and soon after he died. I was appointed Secretary to the Hull Conference and on September 8, ’67, I baptized Joseph Jaggers and rebaptized James Ray.” John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 3 “I now decided to emigrate to Zion. I made the arrangements and went to get my boy, Walter, but his grandmother would not give him up as she did not want him to be taken to Utah among those “awful Mormons”. She shipped his clothes and was on the point of sending him away, but I succeeded in getting him and took him to one of the Saints that was also going to Zion, a young woman by the name of Annie Teather, whose mother was very much against her going to Utah. She kept my boy until we left for Utah. I bade my mother a sad farewell, especially was it sad for her, as she felt like I was going to a worse fate than death. [John’s father had died two years prior to this in 1865.] In company with Walter and Annie Teather and others, we left for Liverpool. A company of Saints joined us on the steamer to cross the River Humber for New Holland. We made a company of 400 Saints, composed of Welch, Scotch, Swiss and English, under the presidency of William Cluff. After six weeks to the day, we dropped anchor in the River Hudson in America. The voyage across the Atlantic was very pleasant to me—only one rough day. Arrived safe with Walter and Annie Teather. After passing the regular Doctor’s examination, we landed at Castle Gardens. We came on the cars of the Hudson Bay Railroad to Albany, then crossed to the Canadian side, where we were loaded into cattle trucks and jolted to Victoria. Here we crossed the river again at Detroit and came on to Chicago, thence to Omaha where we crossed the Missouri River and boarded the Union Pacific cars for the west. After an overland journey of ten days, we reached the North Platt where we camped seven or eight days waiting for our baggage. Wagons and ox teams were waiting for us, so we took our places in them and started for the mountains. Near Benton City we changed our course and journeyed to Utah by way of the Black Hills to avoid the railroad camps where so many rough men were working as railroad hands. We crossed the five crossings of the Sweet Water and through Whisky Gap. At a camp ground nearby we found a freight wagon. The Indians had killed the teamster and run off the cattle and scattered the goods over the prairie. Our captain, John Gillespie, yoked up some beef cattle with some of our teams and brought the wagon to South Pass where there were some men who claimed the wagon. We came over Quaking Asp Ridge to Green River, where on the trip out the company of teams from Sanpete lost three of their boys from drowning. We came on into Ham’s fork. Here we buried the old lady, our first death all the way, except twins of Sister Jackson, and a girl we left ill in a hospital. With these exceptions, we had neither accident, sickness nor death all the way.” [Information about the John Gillespie Company they traveled with:] Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868 John Gillespie Company (1868) Departure: 23-24 Aug 1868 Arrival: 15 Sep 1868 Company Information: About 500 individuals and 50 wagons were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Benton, Wyoming. John Thomas Lazenby was listed as 31 years old. Annie Tether was listed as 23 years old. Walter Lazenby was listed as 3 years old. John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 4 Back to the Life Story by Moroni: “While digging the grave for the old lady, a man tore his pants and exposed through the rip a pair of pants stolen from a brother while crossing the ocean. He was tried and sentenced to be marched around the camp loaded with chains until he was tired out then thrown into the river a number of times. He left camp. We arrived at the head of Echo Canyon on September 14, 1868. Here I bid adieu to Annie and my boy who continued on to Salt Lake City, and as per contract I went to work for John W. Young on the railroad (which I had agreed to do on arriving at New York for which I received a free pass from Omaha to the end of the trek) for which I received $2.50 per day and board. I worked six weeks, then came on to Salt Lake City and was married to Annie by Bishop Thomas McClellan of the Seventh Ward, on the 26th of October 1868. I stayed two days then returned and worked until the middle of November then came in with $20.00 to settle my family for the winter. I soon found that $20.00 would do little toward doing it. I tried to buy a cord of wood. They wanted $20.00 for it. I then tried to buy an old stove. They wanted $20.00 for the stove. I tried to buy a hundred pounds of flour and found it to be $20.00. So I thought everyone knew that I had $20.00. So I decided to take my family back with me to the railroad. I found a man who was going out, and I arranged with him to take us to the camp of John W. Young on the head of the Weber River. We arrived at about the first of December only find that John W. Young’s people had not yet arrived, so I went to work for Bernard Snow and had to pack my belongings down to his camp on my back; then came the job of making a dugout. The best ground had already been taken and there was no timber. I went a couple of miles up the mountain, and with my hatchet cut some quaking asps and dragged them down. I dug my cellar to fit the poles, just enough room for our bed to lie down, and with a fireplace and door in the end. My wife and boy helped all they could. It was difficult finding material to cover it with. All I could get was some leavings of some horses, which made a rather poor covering. It was very cold, and when I got one side covered, my wife and son stood under what shelter there was, which was very little, for it was such a cold day. One night as we sat upon our doubled-up bed, someone nearly fell down our chimney. I had built my cellar in an old roadway. Upon my wanting to know who was there, I found it was part of my old work mates coming from the head of Echo and trying to find their way to John W. Young’s outfit some five miles below, but impossible to reach by trail in the dark. We boiled a kettle of tea and with some bread and sugar made them a warm supper, and as more came, I found lodgings for them in camp. On Sunday I gathered enough sagebrush for two weeks’ firing, and on the next Sunday went to visit my old boss, Warren Snow, and agreed to come and work for him. Soon after this, I started to fix me a better house. This time in a bend of a wash some seven feet deep. I had plenty of timber, but little covering. I was sick from riding an old mujle from Parleys Park to the City with boils upon, well, upon the end of my back. So it being Christmas, some of the boys finished my house for me. The front was a wall of small poles with willows watteled in two rows with dirt between. The top of the house was on a level with the road above. A span of mules walked out on to the roof which frightened Annie who thought it safer outside than in. A man came across the chimney in the evening and thought the earth was on fire. We stayed here until the third of March. We went into Salt Lake and I worked around town until June, when we were baptized and went through the Endowment House March 16, 1869. Annie was the daughter of John Teather and Phebe Oads. I declared my intention to become a citizen of the United States at the office of Patrick Lynch, Clerk of the District Court in Salt Lake City. I moved my family to Pleasant Grove to the home of John Gardner where our son Henry was born [2 Sep 1869]. In April, I went south with Charles Oliphant and stayed in Spring Valley in Nevada that summer and in November I moved my family to Minersville, arrived on the 16th, 1869.” John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 5 “I bought a lot from George Ayers, grubbed squaw brush for Wm. Gillians for a cow. Bought four acres of land from Edwin Ayers, added to it until I had a ten-acre farm, got a team, an old wagon and plow from George Richards, and on May 18, fire destroyed my stable harness and plow, also the calf. I joined the United Order in Minersville in 1874, and when it was dissolved, I got for my share five bushels of corn and ten acres of land in the Minersville field with a full crop of cockleburs and sunflowers. In 1874 I was put in as Secretary of the Y.M.M.I.A., was rebaptized at the general baptism, made a trip to Beaver to meet Brigham Young and hear him talk. I decided to move to Sevier Valley. I settled at Prattsville. I bought an adobe room in a bend of the Sevier River where Venice now is and farmed on shares for Samuel Shorts. I was to have part of the land. While in Minersville, we had four more children born to us. Moroni on January 12, 1872; Annette, April 13, 1873; Sarah Ann, March 26, 1875; and John Thomas, January 12, 1877. After the crop was raised, we did not agree as to the division of the land, so I moved my family to Loa, where we arrived in November 1878. I homesteaded a quarter section of land and commenced to improve it. In the spring of 1880 I put in about eight acres of wheat and eight acres of oats. The seed for which I got from teaching school, but as I had so much ditching to do, I did not get the water onto the place until the 24th day of May, which made it so late that the frost got it all. In 1881 I put in more crop but the frost again took it, so I had to buy my flour. I sold a cow for $14.00 and went to Manti to buy flour. This was quite a journey with an ox team. I got wheat for $1.00 per bushel, had it ground into flour, bran, and shorts—all of which we used for flour before we got any more. Then I had to borrow some bran from Ole Okerlund to finish out on. I worked hard in the field, and on account of lack of proper food, I would get so weak I had to rest before I could walk to the house, but so long as we all kept well, we did not feel to complain. Walter and I made adobes and built chimneys for wheat. We also hired out to build fence. We dressed in buckskin, as it was out of the question to get anything else and we were thankful to get buckskin. I had a piece of meadow land which I mowed with a sythe [scythe]. I got about one ton of hay, which helped. I built a house on the southern part of my homestead where we lived for about two years, then I built a house about one-half mile farther up the creek. It was made of adobes. In 1881 I was elected School Trustee for Fremont which comprised all of what is now Wayne County. A. J. Allred and George W. Stringham were the other two. I served as Ward Teacher under Bishop George Rust. Walter and I continued to build chimneys and to make adobes. Also, we worked on the school house at East Loa which was built on the land of Jehu Blackburn. In 1882 we cleared more land and this year raised 250 bushels of grain. I traded the oxen for a mare named Molley. I bought an old horse and harness, and now I had a horse team—quite an improvement over the slow going oxen, and we enjoyed them. One of my neighbors, a man by the name of Richard Gibbons, met with an accident and broke his leg. On a Sunday morning, I thought I would visit him. I went into the stable to get the horse to ride when he kicked me and broke my leg. Elias H. Blackburn came and set my leg for me. I was confined to my bed for nine weeks. My son, Henry, proved to be a great help in caring for everything, as he was a manly little fellow only 12 years old. This left the care of everything to the boys, Walter and Henry. Walter being 17. He worked out most of the time for wages to help out, so Henry had most of the responsibility of the place. My wife proved to be a true heroine in this emergency, as she did in all things since we came to America. My leg was not set properly, and so did not get strong and I was left a cripple the balance of my life. The brethren, under leadership of Bishop Blackburn, came and put in my crop for me, and we threshed nearly 1,000 bushels of grain. This was certainly a change from eating bran bread to which was added roots, thistles, pigweeds and other things to make it go farther, as we had done the first two years in the valley.” John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 6 “I was elected Justice of the Peace for one year, and in 1884 re-elected for two years. In January of ’84, diphtheria came into our home, and all the children had it, and to our great sorrow, we lost two, Henry and Annie. Henry had become a very important factor on the farm, although he was but 14 years old. Annie was four years old. They were buried on the mound at East Loa, the then, burying place for the entire valley. I was appointed Second Assistant in the Y.M.M.I.A. We got a set of house logs from Silas Young and built up on higher ground, feeling that where we had had diphtheria was not a very healthy place to live. I was elected Secretary of the Irrigation Company. On May 21 my wife and I attended the dedication of the Manti Temple, where among other things we heard the Heavenly Choir singing “Rebecca.” Shortly afterwards, we, my wife and I, took Moroni and Stella to the Temple for their health. I was commissioned as Notary Public, and on the 29th was elected Clerk of the Loa Ward. On September 8, I was appointed Sexton of the Loa Cemetery west of Loa, and on the 17th, with others laid it off in plats. I was elected County Commissioner from Loa in Piute County, and on March 10, 1892 Wayne County was organized, and I was appointed County Clerk and Recorder. On February 13, I was appointed by President Grover Cleveland as Probate Judge of Wayne County. Our family had increased since coming to this place. The following children were born to us: Annie, born June 13, 1879 [died in 1884 of diphtheria]. Estella, born May 23, 1883. Edith H., born August 23, 1884. Bertha M., born June 4, 1886. Annie was taken with paralysis April 1900. On October 29, 1900 a very sad trial came to me. For the second time, my dear wife was called to leave me. This was a very great trial. She was buried on October 31 in the cemetery west of Loa. Received the higher blessing July 5th 1901, at Manti under the hands of Pres. J. D. T. McCallister. [Annie] received the higher blessing July 5th at Manti under the hands of Pres. J.D.T. McCallister, Ellen Barton Bay Matheny as Proxy. Ordained a Patriarch and member of the High Council by Apostle Francis M. Lyman May 13, 1906 at Loa. On August 25, I went to live with Sarah, who was teaching school at Torrey. It was so cold that I went to live with Moroni at Grover, while there Walter’s wife, Mary Emily, passed away at Fish Creek on January 13, 1902. She was buried at Lyman. I went to Annetta’s and stayed the rest of the winter. In the spring Walter brought his family to live with us on the farm. He took care of the farm as a means of livelihood for us all.” John Thomas Lazenby Annie Tether John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 7 Father was married to Maren N[ielsen] Thura in the Manti Temple, July 19, 1907. He lived there several years and worked in the Temple, did 914 endowments and was baptized for 5,598 besides all that he did before he moved to Manti to live. He died April 7, 1915 from a stroke. He and Grandma Thura were planning on meeting Moroni as he passed on his way to General Conference at Salt Lake City. They had been undecided as to whether to go or not, as when he came down the stairs in the morning he said, “Well, do we go to conference this morning or not?” Grandma said, “Yes, we go.” He said, “All right, it is decided then that we meet Moroni at the train and go with him to conference.” He opened the door, stepped out and fell in a stroke. Moroni was sent for. We got a doctor who advised that we send for the children. We did so and watched over him until the end which came peacefully. He served many years as a Patriarch and gave many blessings. He was an Ordinance Worker in the Temple for years. We took him to Loa and buried him beside my mother in the Loa Cemetery, and so lived and died one of the stalwart Utah pioneers who did his full share in pioneering the country and meeting the hardships incident to subduing the country and making it a fit place for people to live. He lived great and he died full of faith and rejoicing that he had come to America to rear his family. May his memory be ever cherished by us who owe to him our very being. WE FOLLOW A FAMOUS FATHER We follow a famous father, His honor is ours to wear, He gave us a name that is free of shame, A name he was proud to bear. He lived in the morning sunlight and marched in the ranks of right, He was always true to the best he knew And the shield that he wore was bright. We follow a famous father, Not known to the printed page Nor written down in the world’s renown As a prince of his title age. But never a stain attached to him And never he stooped to shame, He was bold and brave, and to us he gave The pride of an honest name. We follow a famous father And never a day goes by, But I feel that he looks upon us To carry his standard high. He stood to the sternest trials, As only a brave man can, Though the way be long, we must never wrong The name of so good a man. John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 8 The following song was written by John Thomas Lazenby. [See a draft of the poem on the next page, written in his handwriting on a scrap of paper. There is no date on the paper.] Later in his journal he included the final copy. Utah and the Mormons Who’d ever think that Utah would stir the World so much? Who’d ever think the Mormons were widely known as such? I hardly dare to scribble or on the subject touch. For all are talking of Utah! Chorus: Hurrah! Hurrah! The Mormons have a name, Hurrah! Hurrah! They’re on the road to fame. Don’t matter what they style us, it’s all about the same, For all are talking of Utah! Tis Utah and the Mormons in Congress, pulpit, press. Tis Utah and the Mormons in every place, I guess. We must be growing greater, we can’t be growing less. For all are talking of Utah! They say they’ll send an army to set the Mormon’s right, Regenerate all Utah, and shew us Christian light. Release our wives and children, and set us men to flight For all are talking of Utah! They say that Utah cannot be numbered as a State; They wish our lands divided, but left it rather late. Tis hard to tell of Mormons, what yet will be their fate -- For all are talking of Utah! Whatever may be coming we cannot well foresee; For it may be the railroad or some great prodigy; At least the noted Mormons are watching what’s to be, For all are talking of Utah! I now will tell you something you’ve never thot of yet. We bees are nearly filling the hive of Deseret, If hurt we’ll sting together and gather all we get. For all are talking of Utah! And now the Utah bill has passed and she’s become a state; Remember that she’ll take the lead in all that’s good and great. Redeem the World, point out the way that leads to Heavens gate. Yes, all may now look to Utah! Hurrah! Hurrah! Why can’t the people see? Hurrah! Hurrah! The truth has made us free, We’ll make this chorus ring from East to Western Sea -- While all are talking of Utah. John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 9 John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 10 Walter Hubbard Lazenby Moroni Lazenby Sarah Ann Lazenby Miller Photos of John and Annie’s three younger daughters Estella, Edith, Bertha John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 11 John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 12 Mary Ann Elizabeth (Annie) Tether History 1845 - 1900 by Reva Hatch My great grandmother, Mary Ann Elizabeth (Annie) Tether was born June 30, 1845, in Thorne, Yorkshire, England, the daughter of John Tether and Phebe Oads. Her father died when she was less than a year old, and her widowed mother raised her. She was the youngest of eight children. Samuel, Elizabeth, and Mary Ann died in May 1844. An older brother, Samuel, died in 1841, leaving only John, William, and Charles, all three of whom died before Annie was married. She was a very dainty person, small of stature—less than five feet—and weighed between 85 and 95 pounds. As a young woman, Grandmother joined the L.D.S. Church, which action caused her mother to “kick her out” of her home. She decided to come to Utah, so worked for the families of the other Church members to earn the money for her passage. After some time her family decided she was in earnest, so it was decided to force her to return home and give up the Church. An uncle of Annie’s was a policeman (probably a brother of her mother). She had played on his lap all her life and knew him very well. He was sent to the home where she was working to bring her home. The children answered the door and the gentleman asked for “Miss Tether.” They only knew her as Sister Annie, so told him she was not there. She was standing on the other side of the wooden door wiping her hands on a towel. Another time she was walking down a crowded street in Sheffield and bumped the uncle’s arm, but he did not recognize her. The family did not succeed in forcing her to return home. During this period a severe flood occurred in Sheffield, and it was necessary to take refuge on at least the second floor of the buildings. From the second floor windows it was occasionally possible to reach the hand of someone caught in the flood and pull them to safety. Grandmother saw a man saved this way at the house where she was living, but he lost his grip on his wife’s hand and she was carried away. When she had earned enough money for her passage to the United States, Grandmother went to Liverpool to sail for America. Her money was to be forwarded and meet her there. When she arrived, the money was not there, and she thought she would miss her boat. John Thomas Lazenby, another convert sailing on the same ship, offered to loan her the money for her ticket if she would tend his small son, Walter, and she could repay him when her money caught up with her, so she made this arrangement. The group of Saints crossed the Atlantic Ocean on a chartered sailing boat that had been condemned. The company of about 400 Saints was composed mostly of Welch, Scotch, Swiss, and English converts, under the presidency of William Cluff. They were on the ocean for six weeks. One day a bad storm arose, tossing the boat for three days so fiercely no one could stand up. Grandmother braced her feet and head against the top and bottom of the bunk, took Walter in one arm and the baby of a woman who had three in the other arm, and held the children during the storm. While the others got sick, she lay and laughed at the fun and funniness of the situation. Before leaving Liverpool, each passenger procured sufficient food for six to eight weeks. There was a great stove on the boat for all to cook on. A few could cook their meals on top, but most of the passengers had to cook in the huge oven. The meals were put in one side, and as each was put in, those already in were pushed to the other side and taken out there when done. If someone else thought your meal looked more tasty than their own, yours might be taken and you left with something else. Meal preparation was uncertain, to say the least. The ship docked in New York harbor at the mouth of the Hudson River and sank there, never returning to England. The Saints were short on money for their transportation from New York to Utah, so they chartered a group of cattle cars from the Hudson Bay Railroad, put planks through the holes to sit on, and traveled in this manner. The train went to Albany, up through Canada to Victoria, then back to Detroit, on to Chicago, then to Omaha, where they crossed the Missouri River and boarded the Union Pacific cars for the west. John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 13 A short time after leaving New York, Annie whispered to Grandfather that her corsets were lousy. He told her to slip it off carefully, poke it out through the holes, and he would buy her a new one as soon as he could. She did, but within an hour, they found everyone else was lousy, too. Still, they had to finish their journey in this lousy cattle car. At the North Platt Grandfather had a chance to drive a team of oxen for a man; Grandmother and Uncle Walt were to ride in the wagon, their few belongings also in the wagon. They joined a train for Utah. Every little way someone would miss something, but when they arrived at Green River, Wyoming, they found who had been taking, when a man tore his trousers digging a grave for an old lady and exposed a pair of pants [that had been stolen while crossing the ocean]. A court was held and it was decided to punish the man by making him march around camp loaded with chains until he was tired, then throwing him into the icy waters of the Green River three times and making him swim out. He left camp. The company arrived at the head of Echo Canyon on September 14, 1868. Grandfather remained here to work for John W. Young, helping to bring the railroad west, and Grandmother and Uncle Walt continued on to Salt Lake City. Grandmother and Uncle Walt obtained a room in Salt Lake City. The only furniture they had was the bed roll she and Uncle Walt slept in at night and rolled up by the wall for chairs during the day. After six weeks Grandfather came on into Salt Lake City. They were married October 26, 1868, by Bishop Thomas McClellan of the 7th Ward. He stayed two days, then returned to work until the middle of November. Grandfather had been paid $20, and thought he would purchase something to make life a little more comfortable for Grandmother and Uncle Walt. He saw a load of wood and knew they would need wood for the fireplace, so asked the price -- $20. He went on down the street and saw a stove of sheet iron. That would be easier for her than a fireplace. The price -- $20. He tried to buy 100 pounds of flour, but found it, too, cost $20. He looked at several items, but each was $20. This would leave nothing for clothes or food. Returning to her room, he told her everyone in the city knew he had $20. They packed their belongings in the wagon of a man who was going back up the canyon. When they arrived, they found John W. Young’s crew had not yet arrived, so Grandfather went to work for Bernard Snow. He had to pack their belongings down to his camp on his back, then make a dug-out. It was evening when they arrived, and started to storm. The choicest places had been taken, so they went a mile or so up the mountain, dug a cellar back into the hill just large enough for the bed to lie down, and with a fireplace and door in either end. The only thing they could find to cover the roof was some willows. On this they put some hay from a place where horses had been stabled and loose grass, and covered this with dirt. This was their first home. The furniture consisted of the bedroll, a sack of flour, and a few meager supplies. One night as they were sitting on their bed, someone nearly fell down the chimney. The dugout was built in an old trail. Grandpa went to see who was there, and found it was some of his old work mates coming from the head of Echo and trying to find their way down to John W. Young’s camp, some five miles down the canyon. Being dark, they couldn’t see the trail. They were invited in and given a warm supper. Each evening after work, the men would make dugouts or cellars for three or four families and move them on down the canyon to keep the families up with the railroad. At another house, the front was made of two rows of willows with grass pushed down between the two rows. One night when Grandmother went to get supper ready, she found a rattle snake curled up in the top of the flour sack. She went outside and sat on a rock and held Uncle Walt on her lap until Grandpa came for supper. He, of course, wanted to know why she was sitting on that rock, instead of getting supper. She replied that there was a snake in the flour sack. The other men came over and 23 snakes were found in that one dugout. John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 14 One house was built in the bend of a wash about seven feet deep. The top of the house was on a level with the road above. A span of mules walked out on the roof one night, and, as Grandpa put it, “Annie had business outside in a hurry.” Another time a man came across the chimney in the evening and thought the earth was on fire. They remained here until March 3, 1869. The family moved to Salt Lake City and worked until June. They were rebaptized and went to the Endowment House and were sealed on March 16, 1869. They moved to Pleasant Grove to the home of John Gardner, where their first child, Henry, was born September 2, 1869. They spent the summer there, then moved to Minersville, arriving on November 16. During the years at Minersville, four children were born to the family: Moroni on January 12, 1872; Annetta on April 13, 1873; Sarah Ann on March 26, 1875; and John Thomas on January 12, 1877. In 1874 the family joined the United Order in Minersville. This did not work out. When it was dissolved, they were given ten acres of cockleburs and sunflowers and five bushels of corn. The land was sold to someone and the family moved to Sevier County, settling at Prattsville (now Glenwood). Here they lived in an adobe room on the bend of the Sevier River and farmed on shares for Samuel Shorts. A disagreement arose in the fall, so the family moved to Rabbit Valley (Wayne County) in November 1878. A guide was hired to show them the way. To save their oxen, the men went ahead, breaking trail. Uncle Walt was 15 now, and not enjoying the trip. One day he was complaining of being tired. Then he came up missing. Grandfather was ready to go back to find him, but the guide said no, he would go. He began the tramp back the trail they had come with his whip still in his hand. Soon he found Uncle Walt asleep in the snow. The only way to awaken that kind of sleep is by pain, so he started to whip him. When the boy came to, he was angry for being whipped. The emotion warmed his blood, and the guide took him back to the wagon. After they returned, he told Grandfather he knew what he would find and how to treat it. He knew Grandfather couldn’t whip his own son, so he had gone to save him from freezing to death. In Wayne County they homesteaded 320 acres of land and commenced to improve it. In the spring of 1880 about eight acres each of wheat and oats were planted, but they were killed by frost. The next year a larger acreage was planted, but again it was killed by frost, and the flour had to be purchased. Their first home in Wayne County was a one room log house. The floor, instead of being hard packed dirt as so many pioneer cabins had, was logs split down the middle with an axe and placed as smoothly as possible. The door was of the same construction. In winter a quilt was hung over the door to keep the cold out, but even then the milk, setting on the corner of the table nearest the fireplace, would freeze mushy ice and have to be thawed before every meal. During the first two years in Rabbit Valley, the crops did not mature, and the family was forced to go to all ends to find sufficient food. Some wheat was purchased and ground. First they ate bread make of flour, then bread made from the bran, and finally bran bread to which was added roots, thistles, pigweeds, and other things to make it go further. Two more children had come to bless the home by this time. Annie was born June 13, 1879, and Phebe Estella was born May 23, 1883. In January of 1884 diphtheria came into the home and all of the children had it. Henry, who was now 14 and a great help to his father on the farm, and Annie, who was four, succumbed to the disease. They were buried on the mound at East Loa, which was the cemetery for the entire valley at that time. John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 15 They obtained a set of house logs from Silas Young and built up on higher ground, as they felt the place where they had had diphtheria was not a very healthful place to live. It was a poor house and in a damp area, and little Annie had contracted pneumonia with the diphtheria. The new house was their third home in Rabbit Valley, though all were in the same general area. A daughter Edith Henryetta was born August 23, 1884, and another daughter, Bertha Maria, was born June 4, 1886. The home was within sight of the Indian camp, and it was during the Black Hawk War. The Indians had promised not to harm the whites who had settled in Rabbit Valley if they would come, and this treaty was never broken. Yet the settlers worried about their safety, for there were only eight families in the whole of what is now Wayne County. One day Grandfather looked out and saw Walter fighting with one of the Indian boys at the camp. He broke and ran over all excited. The chief laughed and told him the boys were wrestling to see who was the strongest. During the War the Indians always came to Rabbit Valley for their war dances between raids on settlements in Sanpete and Sevier Counties. These war dances kept the settlers awake and nervous, but the Indians kept their promise. Grain had to be taken to Sevier or Sanpete counties to be ground into flour, so the flour was guarded carefully. One day as Grandmother was working in the cabin, a young, tall Indian brave came in. [His name was “Little Nick.”] He was carrying a pointed stick. (He always carried a pointed stick until his death.) For some reason he stuck it into one of the sacks of flour stacked by the door. A little rivulet of flour ran out onto the floor. He laughed and did it again. Grandmother told him to stop, but he ignored her. After all, it was during the Black Hawk War, and she was a small woman and he a large man. She said she could see her children going hungry part of the winter while he wasted the flour. He refused to listen when told repeatedly to quit poking the sacks with his stick. Finally, Grandmother walked up behind him and gave him a shove out of the open door. He landed on his hands and knees in the dooryard, which was not a very graceful position for an Indian brave. He got up, brushed himself off, and headed back to camp. Then she realized what she had done. When Grandfather came home that evening, she told him what had happened. He, too, was worried. They put the children to bed, then spent a sleepless night, expecting the Indians’ retaliation any time. Just at sunup Grandfather saw the Indians mount their horses and come on the dead run toward the cabin. He told Grandmother to stay inside, while he stepped out and closed the door. The horses ran all the way to the cabin, then were stopped so short they reared on their hind legs. The chief and all the braves of the tribe were there, including the one whom Grandmother had kicked out of the cabin the day before. The chief dismounted, walked up to Grandfather and patted him on the back, and told him what a brave squaw he had. Then they commenced to make fun of the one brave for allowing a woman to kick him out of the house, telling Grandfather all the time, what a brave woman Grandmother had been. Much to their relief, no hard feelings or trouble occurred. One spring night when the grain was just starting into the boot, they heard animals loose out by the field. Grandfather got out of bed, dressed, and went outside to see if he could see what was out there. It was a very dark night, and he could see almost nothing. He noticed, however, that, in addition to the horses he could hear, whenever he walked he could hear someone else walk, but when he stopped the other person stopped. Suddenly he felt a hand on his shoulder. He started and the Indian laughed with great mirth. He told Grandfather to go back to bed, that he was watching the horses. Reluctantly, Grandfather did so, but they spent the night awake listening to the horses moving about over by the grain field, and knowing that by morning the field would be completely pastured off and there would be no wheat for flour that winter. Whey they arose in the morning, they found the area neatly pastured off up to the very edges of the grain, but not one footprint out in the crop. Once again the Indians had kept their word. Around the second cabin in Rabbit Valley Grandmother planted flowers, whatever kinds were available. Her flower gardens were said to be some of the nicest to be seen, truly outstanding. John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 16 Since clothes closets were not ordinarily built in pioneer cabins, the clothes being worn were kept in a box on the floor. Any others were folded and carefully placed on the quilting frames, which were stored on the ceiling joist. The new house which was built after the diphtheria epidemic was almost seventeen feet square. The rooms had high ceilings, as did most pioneer homes. The outside walls were adobe, made by Grandfather and the boys. To keep the walls straight, they made a level from a stick with a string tied to it and a nail hanging to pull the string straight. As the building progressed, they would move the stick up, laying on the top of the last row of adobes, the string and nail hanging down. Then a saucer of water would be set on top of the wall to see that, too, was straight. A few years before her death, Phebe Oads Tether wrote to her daughter in Utah, telling her of the impoverished conditions in which she was living. By return mail a letter was sent inviting her to come to live with Annie, her only living child. They would gladly take care of her here, but were unable to send money to keep her there. Because of her feelings toward the “Mormon” Church, she [Phebe] spent the last days of her life in the Poor House, rather than come to her daughter and son-in-law among the “Mormons”. In May 1888 Grandfather and Grandmother journeyed to Manti for the dedication of the Temple. In his diary, Grandfather says they were privileged to hear the heavenly choir singing “Rebecca”, as well as other wonderful manifestations. Grandmother was an invalid after the birth of her youngest daughter, Bertha, and spent most of the time either on a chair or in bed. She died October 29, 1900, and was buried at the Loa Cemetery. She was survived by her husband, and children Moroni, Annetta, Sarah Ann, John Thomas, Phebe Estella, Edith Henryetta, Bertha Maria, and step-son Walter. [Information for this biography taken from a biography of his parents by Moroni Lazenby and family tradition as dictated to the writer by her mother, Selda Elizabeth Colby Hatch, daughter of Bertha Maria, from incidents of family history told by her mother to her.] John Thomas Lazenby and Annie Tether 17 SNIPPETS The following entries are taken from the book Rainbow Views: A History of Wayne County, compiled by Anne Snow, 1953. “Mrs. Annie Lazenby and Mrs. Bengta Okerlund, early pioneers, were skilled in handicraft. Mrs. Lazenby spun yarn and made shawls, scarfs,and other articles, while Mrs. Okerlund was a weaver of rugs and carpets. Most of the pioneer women crocheted, knitted, and quilted to supply their homes and family with articles they needed.“ [page 204] School Teachers: No complete record has been kept of the different individuals who have taught in the schools of Loa, but the total would likely be well over a hundred. The list of resident teachers is a long one and includes the following: ... Sarah Ann Lazenby.” [page 206] The following trail excerpt was taken from the Mormon Pioneer Overland Travel, 1847-1868. John Gillespie Company (1868) Source of Trail Excerpt: Lazenby, John Thomas, Journal, 1881-1915, 4-5. Read Trail Excerpt: “After an Overland Voyage of 10 Days we reached the North platt[e] river were We Camped for 7 or 8 Days waiting for our Baggage when we took our places in the Waggons with ox teams w[h]ich were waiting for us. Near Benton City Left that point and took Our journey for Utah By Way of the Black hills as the railroad hands were rough and as Our Ship Captain used to say we were a good Company to Be poligamiouse [polygamous] thare being Many More Women then men[.] Crossed the 3 Crossings of the sweet water [Sweetwater] river and Through Whiskey Gap[.] at a Camping ground near sweet water we Found a Freight wagon[.] the Indians had killed the Teamster and run off his team and scattered his Load Over the pasture. Our Captain John Galispie [Gillespie] yoked up some Beif [beef] Cattle With Some of Our Teams and Made up an Extra Team and so brought on the waggon to South pass w[h]ere it was Claimed by Some Mining Men from the Mines Near thare[.] Came on Over Quakeing [Quaking] Aspen ridge to Green river were on the Trip out the Company of Teams from Sampete [Sanpete] Co[unty]. Lost 6 of their Boys By Drowning[.] Came on to Hams Fork w[h]ere Buried an old sister[,] our first Loss all the way Exepte a young girl who was Sick and had to be left at the Belvue Hospital and Twins of a Sister Jackson Widdow of John Jackkson who Died at Hull. The Twins were Born on the way and Died Next Day[.] Exept Those we had neither sickness nor Death or accident[.] at hams Fork a Man maimed Harry Carrol from Liverpool Branch. While Digging the Grave of the Dead Sister Caught his Overalls and the rent shewed a pair of pants lost by a Brother on the Occian [ocean.] he was taken tried and sentenced to be marched around the Camp and then Thrown into the River [several times]. We Arrived at the head of Echo Canion [Canyon] on the September 14th, 68, and here I Bid adue to My Wife and Boy and went to work for John W. Young upon the rail road w[h]ich I had agreed to do on ariving at New york for w[h]ich I recived a free pass from omaha to the end of the Track [trek], I recived 2 Dollars and ½ per Day and board stayed at Work 6 weeks and then came on to Salt Lake City . . .”

My Testimony and Its Worth

Colaborador: toooldtohunt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

In 1864 while still in Hull, England, my ancestor John Thomas Lazenby lost a baby boy at birth and his young wife to consumption. The church he was attending no longer had the answers for him. In his own words: "One day I saw the notice in a newspaper that the Latter-day Saints were holding a meeting, so I went to visit them to see what they had. At the first meeting, I found something more to my liking, and I soon applied for baptism. I was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ Sunday morning on November 18, 1866, by Elder Robert Williams at thee Stone Ferry Baths . . . . Before I joined the Church, I was a member of the Weslian Methodist Society for eight years, an Oddfellow of the Manchester Unity for ten years, and a member of the Young Men's Literary and Christian Association at Hull. When I told my mother that I had joined the Mormon Church, she felt very badly about it, thinking that I had not only disgraced myself but had brought a great disgrace upon the family. She pleaded with me to reconsider and not disgrace them all by going with those low Mormons. I tried to show her the truth about the Church, but she would not listen and the whole family felt that I had done an awful thing. I was no longer welcome at home."

Find A Grave: John Thomas Lazenby

Colaborador: toooldtohunt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Birth: Jan. 12, 1877 Minersville Beaver County Utah, USA Death: Jul. 21, 1926 Delta Millard County Utah, USA Son of John Thomas Lazenby and Mary Ann Elizabeth (Annie) Tether Married Minnie Floyd, 23 May 1901 Married Rebecca Pearl Colby, 6 Nov 1907, Manti, Sanpete, Utah Family links: Parents: John Thomas Lazenby (1836 - 1915) Mary Ann Elizabeth Teather Lazenby (1845 - 1900) Spouse: Rebecca Pearl Colby Lazenby (1890 - 1970)* Children: Ester Lazenby Dickey, (1914 - 2012)* Randal Colby Lazenby (1918 - 2000)* Siblings: Walter Hubbard Lazenby (1865 - 1931)** Moroni Lazenby (1872 - 1953)* Sarah Ann Lazenby Miller (1875 - 1954)* John Thomas Lazenby (1877 - 1926) Bertha Maria Lazenby Colby (1886 - 1946)* *Calculated relationship **Half-sibling Burial: Sigurd Cemetery Sigurd Sevier County Utah, USA Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?] Maintained by: SMSmith Originally Created by: Max Turpin Record added: Aug 21, 2007 Find A Grave Memorial# 21069727

Short story of John Thomas Lazenby written by Moroni Lazenby

Colaborador: toooldtohunt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

JOHN THOMAS LAZENBY October 8, 1836 – April 8, 1916 A short story of my father’s life - written and compiled by Moroni Lazenby, hoping that it will aid to perpetuate his memory for his descendants. John Thomas Lazenby was the son of John Thomas Lazenby and Marie Bean. Born October 8, 1836 at Fixon Square, Fetters Lane, off Market place, Hull, England. His father was a green grocer, or market gardener and had a stand in Hull market place, near King Williams Monument, this is a statute of a man on horseback, larger than life size, made of bronze, standing on a pedestal some 12 feet high. It is on a foundation having five steps, the man and horse are covered with gold leaf which is renewed every four or five years. As a boy, father attended school in Vickers Lane until he was 12 years of age when he left school to help his father care for his business, but continued to go to night school, until he acquired a fair education, excelling both in mathematics and penmanship. When he was 17 years old he hired out as groom to a gentleman named Dr. Dudley at Paterington, a market place 15 miles east of Hull, and remained with him two years. He then went to live with Parson Inman at Skefling. While there, he had to take a Rev. Wilson from Easington to Kidnesa to preach three times each year, as required by law. From here on I copy from Father's own account as he has left it on record. He says: “The first time I took the Rev. Mr. Wilson, we stayed at a Mr. Tennizscon’s where I put up my horse and drank a glass of beer with him until the church let out. The second time I was invited to attend the service, which was held in a school house upon or near the cliffs, a woman and myself constituted the congregation that time. On my third trip, I was again invited into the church, and the same congregation was present with the exception of the woman; both times the whole form of the Church of England ritual was gone through, I being the only listener this time. The Rev. Wilson and the clerk were the only other occupants of the room. I remained with Mr. Dudley one year then went to live at Salby Grance back in Hull. I worked ten years for Mr. George Ashton as teamster. Our main work was attending upon the Gainesboro and York steamers. On July 25, 1867, I went on the steamer express to take the agency of Gool line of steamers, being her Majesty and Empress, Zainsboro steamers this was called the Harlequin Columbine. I married Sarah Ann Hubbard, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Hubbard, in August 1863, at the St. Stevens Church of England. Two little boys came to bless our home; we named them Walter, born March 21, 1865 and William born May 15, 1864 and died the same day. Walter’s grandmother took him and kept him for the next two years. My wife was 20 years old and died from consumption at Hull, May 4, 1866. After she died, I used to go to the cemetery every Sunday and spend most of the day there until November when the weather began to be too cold and damp, then I thought I would go to meeting again, but now the service seemed to be empty and poor, and I could not take interest in the services any more. One day I saw the notice in a newspaper that the Latter-day Saints were holding meeting, so I went to visit them to see what they had; at the first meeting, I found something more to my liking and I soon applied for baptism. I was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ Sunday morning November 18, 1866 by Elder Robert Williams at the Stone Ferry baths, and confirmed the same day by Elder Robert Williams assisted by W. H. Scott and F. Craycroft. I was ordained a Priest by Elder Williams and appointed to be a teacher in the branch on January 6, 1867. On January 13, I preached in the Albert room, and on January 26, 1867 I attended my first Priesthood meeting. It being fast day, I preached at the base of King William’s monument, market place Hull. On May 19, 1867, in company with Wm. Scott, then traveling Elder, I was appointed to my first mission, and it was preaching in the street which was a great trial to me. I had four brothers and one sister; they were: Henry, Edward, William, Charles and Annie who married a Spain. Before I joined the church, I was a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Society for eight years, an Odd fellow of the Manchester Unity for ten years and a member of the young Men’s Literary and Christian Association at Hull. About the first part of January 1867, I dreamed there would be no emigration that year but there would be a large one in 1868 and that I should go to Zion. I told my dream to President Williams, then I learned for the first time about the emigration of the Saints to Utah, but he said there was nothing to my dream as there was always an emigration every year. But on Tuesday following, as I carried the freight of the Gainsburrow along the pier to the wagon, President Williams met me and said there was a letter in the Star from President Young telling the saints not to come to Zion in ‘67 as the railroad was being built across the western plains and that if they would wait until ‘68 he could send many more teams and wagons the shorter distance and bring all who had a desire to come. When I told my mother that I had joined the Mormon church, she felt very badly about it, thinking that I had not only disgraced myself but had brought a great disgrace upon the family. She pleaded with me to reconsider and not disgrace them all by going with those low Mormons. I tried to show her the truth about the church, but she would not listen and the whole family felt that I had done an awful thing, and I was no longer welcome at home. On July ‘67 I was eating my lunch in the storm boats little office about (7 by 9) close by the edge of the dock, when the mooring rope of the Gool Steamer, Express, jerked one of the foundation blocks out of place. I called the sailors up to fix it. Captain Wright asked me to come and eat dinner in the boat cabin. He then told me he had chosen me to be their agent at Hull and took me that day to meet the directors of the company. That evening I obtained the appointment, and so the Lord opened the way for the fulfillment of the dream I had in January, six months before. For this I have been thankful to this day. I was appointed Secretary to the Hull conference and on September 8, ‘67, I baptized Joseph Jaggers and re-baptized James Ray. I was appointed presiding teacher over district number three, and in February ‘67 was ordained an Elder under the hands of Elder John Jackson; and soon after he died. I now decided to immigrate to Zion. I made the arrangements and went to get my boy, Walter, but his grandmother would not give him up as she did not want him to be taken to Utah among those awful Mormons; she shipped his clothes and was on the point of sending him away, but I succeeded in getting him and took him to one of the saints that was also going to Zion, a young woman by the name of Annie Tether, whose mother was very much against her going to Utah. She kept my boy until we left for Utah. I bade my mother a sad farewell, especially was it sad for her as she felt like I was going to a worse fate than death. In company with Walter and Annie Tether and others, we left for Liverpool. A company of saints joined us on the steamer to cross the river Humber for New Holland. We made a company of 400 saints, composed of Welch, Scotch, Swiss and English, under the presidency of William Cluff. After six weeks to the day, we dropped anchor in the River Hudson in America. The voyage across the Atlantic was very pleasant to me -- only one rough day. Arrived safe with Walter and Annie Tether. After passing the regular Doctor’s examination, we landed at Castle Gardens. We came on the cars of the Hudson Bay Railroad to Albany, then crossed to the Canadian side, where we were loaded into cattle trucks and jolted to Victoria. Here we crossed the river again at Detroit and came on to Chicago, thence to Omaha where we crossed the Missouri river and boarded the Union Pacific cars for the west. After an overland journey of ten days, we reached the north Platt where we camped seven or eight days waiting for our baggage. Wagons and ox teams were waiting for us, so we took our places in them and started for the Mountains. Near Benton City we changed our course and journeyed to Utah by way of the Black Hills to avoid the railroad camps where so many rough men were working as railroad hands. We crossed the five crossings of the Sweet Water and through whisky gap. At a camp ground near by we found a freight wagon. The Indians had killed the teamster and run off the cattle and scattered the goods over the prairie. Our captain, John Gillespie, yoked up some beef cattle with some of our teams and brought the wagon to South Pass where there were some men who claimed the wagon. We came over Quaking Aspen ridge to Green river, where on the trip out the company of teams from Sanpete lost three of their boys from drowning. We came on into Ham's fork. Here we buried the old lady, our first death all the way, except twins of Sister Jackson, and a girl we left ill in a hospital. With these exceptions, we had neither accident, sickness or death all the way. While digging the grave for the old lady, a man tore his pants and exposed through the rip a pair of pants stolen from a brother while crossing the ocean. He was tried and sentenced to be marched around the camp loaded with chains until he was tired out then thrown into the river a number of times. He left camp. We arrived at the head of Echo canyon on September 14, 1868. Here I bid adieu to Annie and my boy who continued on to Salt Lake City, and as per contract I went to work for John W. Young on the railroad for which I received $2.50 and board. I worked six weeks, then came onto Salt Lake City and was married to Annie by Bishop Thomas McClellan of the seventh ward, on the 26 of October 1868. I stayed two days then returned and worked until the middle of November then came in with $20.00 to settle my family for the winter. I soon found that $20.00 would do little toward doing it. I tried to buy a cord of wood. They wanted $20.00 for it. I then tried to buy an old stove. They wanted $20.00 for the stove. I tried to buy a hundred pounds of flour and found it to be $20.00. So I thought that everyone knew that I had $20.00. So I decided to take my family back with me on to the railroad. I found a man who was going out, and I arranged with him to take us to the camp of John W. Young on the head of the Weber River. We arrived at about the first of December only to find that John W. Young’s people had not yet arrived, so I went to work for Bernard Snow and had to pack my belongings down to his camp on my back, then came the job of making a dugout. The best ground had already been taken and there was no timber. I went a couple of miles up the mountain, and with my hatchet cut some quaking aspen and dragged them down. I dug my cellar to fit the poles, just enough room for our bed to lie down, and with a fireplace and door in the end. My wife and boy helped all they could. It was difficult finding material to cover it with. All I could get was some leavings of some horses, which made a rather poor covering. It was very cold, and when I got one side covered, my wife and son stood under what shelter there was, which was very little, for it was such a cold day. One night as we sat upon our doubled-up bed, someone nearly fell down our chimney. I had built my cellar in an old roadway. Upon my wanting to know who was there, I found it was part of my old work mates coming from the head of Echo and trying to find their way down to John W. Young’s outfit some five miles below, but impossible to reach by trail in the dark. We boiled a kettle of tea and with some bread and sugar made them a warm supper, and as more came, I found lodgings for them in camp. Soon after this, I started to fix me a better house. This time in a bend of a wash some seven feet deep. I had plenty of timber, but little covering. I was sick with some boils on my sit-down, aggravated from riding an old mule from the head of Parley’s park to the city. So it being Christmas, some of the boys finished my house for me. The front was a wall of small poles with willows wattled in two rows with dirt between. The top of the house was on a level with the road above. A span of mules walked out on to the roof which frightened Annie who thought it safer outside than in. A man came across the chimney in the evening and thought the earth was on fire. We stayed here until the third of March. We went into Salt Lake and I worked around town until June, when we were baptized and went through the Endowment House March 17, 1869. Annie was the daughter of John Tether and Phebe Oads. I declared my intention to become a citizen of the United States at the office of Patrick Lynch, clerk of the District Court in Salt Lake City. I moved my family to Pleasant Grove to the home of John Gardner where our son Henry was born. In April I went south with Charles Oliphant and stayed in Spring Valley in Nevada that summer and in November I moved my family to Minersville, arrived on the 16, 1869. I bought a lot from George Ayers, grubbed squaw brush for Wm Gillians for a cow. Bought four acres of land from Edwin Ayers, added to it until I had a ten-acre farm, got a team, an old wagon and plow from George Richards, and on May 18, fire destroyed my stable harness and plow, also the calf. I joined the United Order in Minersville in 1874, and when it was dissolved, I got for my share five bushels of corn and ten acres of land in the Minersville field with a full crop of cockleburs and sunflowers. In 1874 I was put in as secretary of the Y.M.M.I.A., was re-baptized at the general baptism, made a trip to Beaver to meet Brigham Young and hear him talk. I decided to move to Sevier Valley. I settled at Prattville. I bought an adobe room in a bend of the Sevier River where Venice now is and farmed on shares for Samuel Shorts. I was to have part of the land. While in Minersville, we had five more children born to us. Moroni on January 12, 1872, Annette April 13, 1973, Sarah Ann March 28, 1875, John Thomas January 12, 1877. Annie at Loa, June 13, 1879. After the crop was raised, we did not agree as to the division of the land, so I moved my family to Loa, where we arrived in November 1878. I homesteaded a quarter section of land and commenced to improve it. In the spring of 1880 I put in about eight acres of wheat and eight acres of oats. The seed for which I got for teaching school, but as I had so much ditching to do, I did not get the water onto the place until the 24th of May, which made it so late that the frost got it all. In 1881 I put in more crop but the frost again took it, so I had to buy my flour. I sold a cow for $14.00 and went to Manti to buy flour. This was quite a journey with an ox team. I got wheat for $1.00 per bushel, had it ground into flour, bran, and shorts -- all of which we used for flour before we got any more. Then I had to borrow some bran from Ole Okerlund to finish out on. I worked hard in the field, and on account of lack of proper food, I would get so weak I had to rest before I could walk to the house, but so long as we all kept well, we did not feel to complain. Walter and I made adobes and built chimneys for wheat. We also hired out to build fence. We dressed in buckskin, as it was out of the questions to get anything else and we were thankful to get buckskin. I had a piece of meadow land which I mowed with a scythe. I got about one ton of hay, which helped. I built a house on the southern part of my homestead where we lived for about two years, then I built a house about one-half mile farther up the creek. It was made of adobes. In 1881 I was elected school trustee for Fremont which comprised all of what is now Wayne County. A. J. Alfred and George W. Stringham were the other two. I served as ward teacher under Bishop George Rust. Walter and I continued to build chimneys and to make adobes. Also, we worked on the school house at East Loa which was built on the land of Jehu Blackburn. In 1882 we cleared more land and this year raised 250 bushels of grain. I traded the oxen for a mare named Molley. I bought an old horse and harness, and now I had a horse team -- quite an improvement over the slow going oxen, and we enjoyed them. One of my neighbors, a man by the name of Richard Gibbons, met with an accident and broke his leg. On a Sunday morning, I thought I would visit him. I went into the stable to get the horse to ride when he kicked me and broke my leg. Elias H. Blackburn came and set my leg for me. I was confined to bed for nine weeks. My son, Henry, proved to be a great help in caring for everything, as he was a manly little fellow only 12 years old. This left the care of everything to the boys, Walter and Henry, Walter being 17. He worked out most of the time for wages to help out, so Henry had most of the responsibility of the place. My wife proved to be a true heroine in this emergency, as she did in all things since we came to America. My leg was not set properly, and so did not get strong and I was left a cripple the balance of my life. The brethren, under the leadership of Bishop Blackburn, came and put in my crop for me, and we threshed nearly 1000 bushels of grain. This was certainly a change from eating bran bread to which was added roots, thistles, pigweeds and other things to make it go farther, as we had done the first two years in the valley. I was elected Justice of the Peace for one year, and in 1884 re-elected for two years. In January of ‘84, diphtheria came into our home, and all the children had it, and to our great sorrow, we lost two, Henry and Annie. Henry had become a very important factor on the farm, although he was but 14 years old. Annie was four years old. They were buried on the mound at East Loa, the then burying place for the entire valley. I was appointed second assistant in the Y.M.M.I.A. We got a set of house logs from Silas Young and built up on higher ground, feeling that where we had had diphtheria was not a very healthy place to live. I was elected secretary of the Irrigation Company. On May 21, my wife and I attended the dedication of the Manti temple, where among other things we heard the Heavenly choir singing “Rebecca.” Shortly afterwards, we, my wife and I took Moroni and Stella to the temple for their health. I was commissioned as Notary Public, and on the 29 was elected clerk of the Loa ward. On September 8, I was appointed sexton of the Loa cemetery west of Loa, and on the 17, with others laid it off in plats. I was elected county commissioner from Loa in Piute County, and on March 10, 1892 Wayne County was organized, and I was appointed County Clerk and recorder. On February 13, I was appointed by President Grover Cleveland as Probate Judge of Wayne County. Our family had increased since coming to this place. The following children were born to us: Annie, born June 13, 1879. Estella born May 23, 1883. Edith H. born August 13, 1884. Bertha M. born June 4, 1886. On October 29, 1900 a very sad trial came to me. For the second time for my dear wife to be called to leave me. This was a very great trial. She was buried October 22, 1900 in the cemetery west of Loa. On August 25, I went to live with Sarah, who was teaching school at Torrey. It was so cold that I went to live with Moroni at Grover, while there Walter’s wife, Mary Emily passed away at Fish Creek on January 13, 1902. She was buried at Lyman. I went to Annetta’s and stayed the rest of the winter. In the spring Walter brought his family to live with us on the farm. He took care of the farm as a means of livelihood for us all.” Father was married to Mary N. Thura in the Manti Temple July 19, 1907. He lived there several years and worked in the temple, did 914 endowments and was baptized for 5598 besides all that he did before he moved to Manti to live. He died April 8, 1916 from a stroke. He and Grandma Thura were planning on meeting Moroni as he passed on his way to the General Conference at Salt Lake City; they had been undecided as to whether to go or not, so when he came down stairs in the morning he said, “Well, do we go to conference this morning or not”. Grandma said “yes, we go.” He said “all right, it is decided then that we meet Moroni at the train and go with him to conference.” He opened the door, stepped out and fell in a stroke. Moroni was sent for. We got a Doctor who advised that we send for the children. We did so and watched over him until the end which came peacefully. He served many years as a Patriarch and gave many blessings. He was an ordinance worker in the temple for years. We took him to Loa and buried him beside my mother in the Loa cemetery, and so lived and died one of the stalwart Utah pioneers who did his full share in pioneering the country and meeting the hardships incident to subduing the country and making it a fit place for people to live. He lived great and he died full of faith and rejoicing that he had come to America to rear his family. May his memory be ever cherished by us who owe to him our very being.

(Lazenby grandparents) Excerpts from the Life Story of Vaughn Stanford Nelson (based on notes written by Vaughn, organized by Karen Nelson Atamanczyk with the help of Veda Pearce Nelson

Colaborador: toooldtohunt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

My grandparents Lazenby came from England; over the water and across the plains as sweethearts to be married in Utah. They crossed the plains on the railroad in a stock car. Granddad worked on the railroad when it was being build in Utah. He earned $40--with which he bought a stove, with all the kettles and frying pans, and that took all his $40. They dug a hole in the side of the hill, covered it with sticks and brush, for a place to live through the winter. They jobbed around for whatever they could do in order to eat. Moved to Loa, Wayne county, Utah to settle that part of the state. The jack rabbits were so thick the people had rabbit drives to kill them off. There was no shopping center or store for at least two weeks trip with wagon. Later Granddad helped to build and hold shares in a co-op store in Loa.

Life timeline of John T. Lazenby

1836
John T. Lazenby was born on 8 Oct 1836
John T. Lazenby was 4 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
John T. Lazenby was 23 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
John T. Lazenby was 24 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
John T. Lazenby was 43 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
John T. Lazenby was 51 years old when The Great Blizzard of 1888 struck the northeastern United States, producing snowdrifts in excess of 50 ft (15 m) and confining some people to their houses for up to a week. The Great Blizzard of 1888 or Great Blizzard of '88 was one of the most severe recorded blizzards in the history of the United States of America. The storm, referred to as the Great White Hurricane, paralyzed the East Coast from the Chesapeake Bay to Maine, as well as the Atlantic provinces of Canada. Snowfalls of 10 to 58 inches fell in parts of New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut, and sustained winds of more than 45 miles per hour (72 km/h) produced snowdrifts in excess of 50 feet (15 m). Railroads were shut down, and people were confined to their houses for up to a week. Railway and telegraph lines were disabled, and this provided the impetus to move these pieces of infrastructure underground. Emergency services were also affected.
John T. Lazenby was 62 years old when Spanish–American War: The Treaty of Paris is signed, officially ending the conflict. The Spanish–American War was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to US intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War.
John T. Lazenby was 67 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
John T. Lazenby died on 6 Apr 1915 at the age of 78
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for John T. Lazenby (8 Oct 1836 - 6 Apr 1915), BillionGraves Record 4046117 Loa, Wayne, Utah, United States

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