Keith Clem Poulsen

29 Apr 1925 - 15 Jul 1993

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Keith Clem Poulsen

29 Apr 1925 - 15 Jul 1993
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I, Keith Clem Poulsen, was born 29 April, 1925, in Liberty, Bear Lake County, Idaho. I was the ninth child of twelve children born to Clem Andrus Poulsen and Marth Stephanie Nilsen. My father was the son of James Poulsen and Mary Humphreys. My mother was the daughter of Jacob Stephanus Nilsen and Fr
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Life Information

Keith Clem Poulsen

Nasceu:
Casado(a): 15 Nov 1948
Morreu:

Smithfield City Cemetery

376-424 E Center St
Smithfield, Cache, Utah
United States

Epitáfio

Families Are Forever

Headstone Description

Children - Kent, Michael, Suzanne, Lon, David
Copista

Jane Little

April 16, 2012
Fotógrafo

doclouie

April 3, 2012

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Memories

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Keith Clem Poulsen

Colaborador: Jane Little Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

I, Keith Clem Poulsen, was born 29 April, 1925, in Liberty, Bear Lake County, Idaho. I was the ninth child of twelve children born to Clem Andrus Poulsen and Marth Stephanie Nilsen. My father was the son of James Poulsen and Mary Humphreys. My mother was the daughter of Jacob Stephanus Nilsen and Frederikke Caroline Andersen. I remember so many events that seem to run together in my mind, that I have a difficult time separating them into time periods. However, each of the following experiences made a lasting impression on my mind. The earliest memories are of the times I would play ‘farm’ without the use of real play toys. I used small boards for plows and harrows, etc. I made fences with white string for wire, and sticks for posts, which I felt were my specialty. The gates worked like the real thing, and I made roads and trails. I cleared the land, plowed, harrowed and planted with my make-believe implements. I remember running over newly plowed ground with messages for my Father, getting spring water for house use, carrying wood and chips to fill the wood-box that was behind the kitchen stove, throwing rocks at the ground squirrels because they were such pests in the fields, sending Fritz, our dog, to bring the cows to the barn for milking. I almost had him trained well enough that he could do it by himself. Memories of tromping hay on the hay rack as Dad pitched it up to me, and driving the horses, Queen and Mel, are good memories. The aroma of mother’s newly baked bread as I came up the road to the house was special.

Burning Tumbleweeds

Colaborador: Jane Little Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Burning the tumbleweeds that had blown up against the fences was a responsibility that I well remember and liked. In regards to the tumbleweeds, however, one incident stays with me yet. One day my little sister, Norine, was helping me with this responsibility. I would push the pitch-fork under the weeds and stack them in a pile. This particular day, when I shoved the fork under the weeds, we heard a loud scream, much like a child’s scream. I knew it couldn’t be a child, so I thought it must be a squirrel. I asked Norine to take the weeds off the fork, and there to our shock was a cotton-tail rabbit with the pitch-fork tine through its middle. Norine cried as I pulled the fork from the rabbit. I took a rag from my pocket and wrapped it around the rabbit and then carried it home to get care. However, much to our sorrow, it was dead by the time we reached our house. We dug a hole near our garden and tenderly buried it.

Eggs

Colaborador: Jane Little Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

One day, mother handed me a small bucket of eggs and grocery list. I took both of them and headed down the road to the grocery store about two miles away. Most of the time, it seemed more like ten miles. When I was about two blocks from the store, I stumbled. With every effort possible, I tried to keep the bucket of eggs from hitting the ground, but to my sorrow, nearly all the eggs were broken. I knew how important the few groceries were to our family, and I felt I must somehow get them. I stood in the road crying and wondering what I should do. I knelt beside the bucket, trying to evaluate the number of surviving eggs. Still crying, I decided to continue to the store. Mr. Jewel, the store owner, came out from the back of the store. I handed him the bucket and the grocery list between sobs. To my surprise, Mr. Jewel took the bucket and few remaining eggs in one hand and the grocery list in the other and went again into the back of the store. Shortly, he returned with the bucket and needed groceries. I don’t remember what I said to him, but I do remember how overjoyed I was at his kindness to a very sad little boy. In my eyes that day, he truly was, “Mr. Jewel”.

MEMORIES AS A YOUNG BOY ON THE FARM.

Colaborador: Jane Little Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

MEMORIES AS A YOUNG BOY by Keith C. Poulsen from LIFE STORY OF KEITH CLEM POULSEN “The earliest memories are of the times I would play “farm” without the use of real play toys. I used small boards for plows and harrows, etc. I made fences with white strings for wire, and sticks for posts, which I felt were my specialty. The gates worked like the real things, and I made roads and trails. I cleared the land, plowed, harrowed and planted with my make-believe implements.” “I remember running over newly plowed ground with messages for my Father, getting spring water for house use, carrying wood and chips to fill the wood box that was behind the kitchen stove, throwing rocks at the ground squirrels because they were such pests in the field, sending, Fritz, our dog, to bring the cows to the barn for milking. I almost had him trained well enough that he could do it by himself.”

Memories of Keith

Colaborador: Jane Little Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

From Keith's Autobiography- I remember tromping hay on the hay rack as Dad pitched it up to me. I also remember driving the horses, Queen and Mel. These are good memories. The aroma of Mother's newly baked bread as he came up the road to the house was special. Burning the tumbleweeds that had blown up against the fences was responsibility that I well remember and liked. In regards to the tumbleweeds, however, on incident stays with me yet. One day my little sister, Norine, was helping me with this responsibility. I would push the pitch-fork under the weeds and stack them in a pile. This particular day, when I shoved the fork under the weeds, we heard a loud scream, much like a child’s scream. I knew it couldn't be a child, so I thought it must be a squirrel. I asked Norine to take the weeds off the fork, and there to our shock was a cotton-tail tine through its’ middle. Norine cried as I pulled the fork from the rabbit. I took a rag from my picket and wrapped it around the rabbit and then carried it home to get care. However, much to our sorrow, it was dead by the time we reached our house. We dug a hole near our garden and tenderly buried it.

Gangbusters

Colaborador: Jane Little Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

From Keith's Autobiography "I was coming home from school one day and saw my brothers installing a radio antenna. I will never forget what a radio brought into our home. Really,the outside world. The program, 'Gangbusters' was terrific, and I remember that it came on every Monday Night. How we looked forward to that entertainment. We didn't have electricity in our house, so this radio was run by a large battery, and we seldom had static on it. (Gang Busters was a famous radio program that was first heard 1936 and aired until until 1957. The sound effects of police sirens, tommyguns, and screeching tires that opened the show were dramatic and exciting—this inspired the expression 'coming on like gangbusters'. Usage has opened up to describe things that are not just exciting, but successful, intense, and many other adjectives, and may drop the 'coming on like' prefix. I think we should be more careful about how we use it, and keep it true to its origin—something that starts with uch excitement and drama is 'coming on like gangbusters'.)

CUTTING AND HAULING LOGS OUT OF NORTH CANYON.

Colaborador: Jane Little Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Taken from Keith's Autobiography- "Cutting and hauling logs out of North Canyon for our fuel was a yearly responsibility in the Fall. Dad, Rex, and Perth did this for a long time. Then, when Rex and Perth were both in the mission field, Dad took me with him. I was only nine years old, but I was anxious to go. There was on experience that I will not forget. Dad and I had loaded the wagon with many logs and was headed for home. Dad sat on a log close behind the wagon with many logs and was headed for home. Dad sat on a log close behind the team, and I sat behind Dad so that I could pull the brake rope. I was pleased with that responsibility. However, as we proceeded down the canyon, I noticed that the brake rope was frayed in one spot. I told Dad about it, but he said that he really felt it would be alright. I continued to worry though. The logging road where we were traveling on was steep in some places, and the heavy load really seemed to be pushing the team. This added to my fear. I know that the worst place was about a mile down the canyon where our logging road met the highway. When we came near this spot. Dad told me that I would have to brake harder. Then it happened! The frayed rope broke and down the road we went with the load pushing the team down the slopes. There was nothing that we could do but hold on. When we reached the highway where we were to turn, the team and loaded wagon were literally pushed across the highway and into the far side of the barrow pit. The next several hours were spent with us unloading the logs, unhitching the team, re hitching them to the rear of the wagon and pulling the wagon back upon the highway, and then reloading the logs. We then had to make another neck yolk before we could continue on our way home. I was glad when that day was over.

Lesson Learned from Harrowing

Colaborador: Jane Little Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Taken from Keith's Autobiograph- When I was in my tenth year, my Father told me to harrow one of the grain fields, about 30 acres, as I remember. I was pleased to be asked to do this, and began at once to walk behind the harrows and drive the team. However, as time went on, monotony set in, and I soon found myself thinking of ways that I could get the job done faster. The second harrowing is done by going over the ground in an opposite direction. I decided to skip a few feet each time around, leaving part of the ground harrowed only once. As time passed, the skipped areas became wider and wider, until I was skipping more than I was harrowing, then… I say Dad! He was just leaving the barn about a mile away. I thought that perhaps I would have time to correct at least part of my scheme before he reached me, but I had only gone over about three rounds by the time he got to where I was. He obviously was surprised to see how far I had gotten, and I feared he would investigate. My fears were realized and my deception was discovered. However, I didn’t receive the scolding that I expected and deserved. He merely took me over the areas that I had missed, and patiently, in detail, showed me my error. Then I had to correct it.

Life timeline of Keith Clem Poulsen

1925
Keith Clem Poulsen was born on 29 Apr 1925
Keith Clem Poulsen was 6 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Keith Clem Poulsen was 20 years old when World War II: German forces in the west agree to an unconditional surrender. The German Instrument of Surrender ended World War II in Europe. The definitive text was signed in Karlshorst, Berlin, on the night of 8 May 1945 by representatives of the three armed services of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW) and the Allied Expeditionary Force together with the Supreme High Command of the Red Army, with further French and US representatives signing as witnesses. The signing took place 9 May 1945 at 00:16 local time.
Keith Clem Poulsen was 32 years old when Space Race: Launch of Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth. The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability. It had its origins in the missile-based nuclear arms race between the two nations that occurred following World War II, aided by captured German missile technology and personnel from the Aggregat program. The technological superiority required for such dominance was seen as necessary for national security, and symbolic of ideological superiority. The Space Race spawned pioneering efforts to launch artificial satellites, uncrewed space probes of the Moon, Venus, and Mars, and human spaceflight in low Earth orbit and to the Moon.
Keith Clem Poulsen was 39 years old when John F. Kennedy was assassinated by Lee Harvey Oswald in Dallas, Texas; hours later, Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in aboard Air Force One as the 36th President of the United States. John Fitzgerald Kennedy, commonly referred to by his initials JFK, was an American politician who served as the 35th President of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. He served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his presidency dealt with managing relations with the Soviet Union. As a member of the Democratic Party, Kennedy represented the state of Massachusetts in the United States House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate prior to becoming president.
Keith Clem Poulsen was 47 years old when Munich massacre: Nine Israeli athletes die (along with a German policeman) at the hands of the Palestinian "Black September" terrorist group after being taken hostage at the Munich Olympic Games. Two other Israeli athletes were slain in the initial attack the previous day. The Munich massacre was an attack during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, in which the Palestinian terrorist group Black September took eleven Israeli Olympic team members hostage and killed them along with a West German police officer.
Keith Clem Poulsen was 56 years old when The first launch of a Space Shuttle (Columbia) takes place: The STS-1 mission. The Space Shuttle was a partially reusable low Earth orbital spacecraft system operated by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), as part of the Space Shuttle program. Its official program name was Space Transportation System (STS), taken from a 1969 plan for a system of reusable spacecraft of which it was the only item funded for development. The first of four orbital test flights occurred in 1981, leading to operational flights beginning in 1982. In addition to the prototype whose completion was cancelled, five complete Shuttle systems were built and used on a total of 135 missions from 1981 to 2011, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. Operational missions launched numerous satellites, interplanetary probes, and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST); conducted science experiments in orbit; and participated in construction and servicing of the International Space Station. The Shuttle fleet's total mission time was 1322 days, 19 hours, 21 minutes and 23 seconds.
Keith Clem Poulsen died on 15 Jul 1993 at the age of 68
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Keith Clem Poulsen (29 Apr 1925 - 15 Jul 1993), BillionGraves Record 919292 Smithfield, Cache, Utah, United States

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