Marion Alonzo Brown

16 Oct 1908 - 12 Jan 1970

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Marion Alonzo Brown

16 Oct 1908 - 12 Jan 1970
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Written by her daughter Marjie Brown Erickson My mother (Phoebe) was born in Washington County June 2, 1883 a daughter of Jacob S. Bastian and Harriet Ann Taylor Bastian. She was one of a family of 10, seven sisters and two brothers and herself. My mother (Phoebe) was about four years old when she m
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Life Information

Marion Alonzo Brown

Nasceu:
Casado(a): 31 Aug 1935
Morreu:

Loa Cemetery

Unnamed Rd
Loa, Wayne, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Our Children Boyd Alonzo Evelyn Nielson Albert Niel Marion 'J' Gladys
Copista

Diane_R

May 18, 2013
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toooldtohunt

May 16, 2013

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Marion Alonzo Brown is buried in the Loa Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Loa Cemetery

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Unnamed Rd
Loa,Wayne,Utah
United States
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History of Phoebe Harriet Bastian Brown

Colaborador: Diane_R Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Written by her daughter Marjie Brown Erickson My mother (Phoebe) was born in Washington County June 2, 1883 a daughter of Jacob S. Bastian and Harriet Ann Taylor Bastian. She was one of a family of 10, seven sisters and two brothers and herself. My mother (Phoebe) was about four years old when she moved to Loa in the fall of 1887. It was so hot and dry down in Washington County that the people were having chills and fever. My grandmother (Harriet) was advised by her Dr. to go to a higher climate. The water was scarce so my grandfather (Jacob) was ready to move. Grandfather brought his horses and cattle, he was a lover of horses, and came to Loa. It took nine days to make the trip. They had the following children when they came to Loa, Annie, Jacob who died in Dixie, my mother Phoebe, Gertie and Jennie. After they came to Loa Trena, Melvina, Georgia, Antone, and Dora were born. My Aunt Jennie tells of the time my grandfather bought a History of the Utah Pioneers. It cost $12.50 to buy the book so grandfather sold one steer and added 50 cents to buy this book. When my mother (Phoebe) first came to Loa to live their home was on the farm that is now owned by Harold Johansen. Being early pioneers of Wayne County she would have to help grub the brush, herd the cattle and do other hard work as well as house work for other people. She had to work very hard. She would help her father with the farm work and go into peoples and work every time any one needed help. I am told that she was a good worker and worked very fast. She was as neat as a pin. She had lots of boyfriends and always loved to dance. She was especially a good dancer and took prizes for waltzing. Many a night she would walk into town for a dance, and after the dance she would walk home, a distance of two miles. Many of her friends can remember the long black stockings that the girls all wore and when they found a hole in the leg of them they would black the hole with soot taken from the lid of the cook stove and my mother (Phoebe) was no different than the rest. It was her and her sister Gertrude’s job each morning before school to hitch one horse on a water sleigh with a tool bar and put two wooden barrels on the sleigh and go to Spring Creek and fill them for the family’s use during the day. This was the family lived where Jay Hall now lives. Many a morning in the winter months when it was so cold their clothes would be frozen stiff from water spilling and splashing from the barrels. Her father went on a mission to Denmark leaving November 24, 1894 and was gone three years. When her father went on a mission she with the help of her sisters Annie and Gertrude took care of the farm and stock in order to support the family and keep their father on a mission. My mother use(d) to sing in the Choir and she would go along with Brother William C. Potter Sr. and Pauline Grover Brown to Blue Valley in a wagon to sing and play for conference. In later years Pauline Grover Brown was to be her mother-in-law as she married her son Fredrick Elroy Brown. They were married March 15, 1905 in the Manti Temple. He had served on a mission in Indiana prior to their marriage. There was only one teacher, Sarah Ann Lazenby, in Loa when my mother went to school. She only went as far as the sixth grade as there were no grades higher in Loa at the time. They were not called graded at that time. The art class was the first grade, the second reader, and so on until the sixth reader. Aunt Jennie Mansfield tells me that the biggest tease in the whole school was Fred Webster. He use(d) to fight with the teacher, Sarah Ann Lazenby, and pull the girls hair. Fred Webster later turned out to be our Stake President. My mother was a good singer. She sang in the Loa Choir. The seats were numbered and she had a seat with Rhoda Taylor and Flora Russell. She sang for almost all of the funerals. When she started to go with my father, Aunt Jennie said you could tell right from the beginning that my father’s intention toward my mother was serious. It was almost love from there first date. He would bring his white top buggy over to the farm and get my mother and take her to the dances and parties. After a year and a half of courtship they were married in the Manti Temple. They went in a white top buggy. My Aunt Jennie and Sister Sarah Robinson (wife of Willis E. Robison) went with them. Sister Robison had erisiplus so she went for a blessing and was much better when she went home. My mother had a beautiful wedding dress made of white bridal satin. It was made by Pauline Brown, her mother-in-law and she was a beautiful bride. At this time in my grandfather’s life he was considered quite well to do. As a gift he gave a cow and a mare. My father bought a beautiful new dark suit. They made a fine looking couple. Their wedding dance was held in the upstairs of the old brick hall that was owned by Lon Billings. It stood where the Utah Poultry now stands. My father and mother lived in the old Bastian home where my mother was raised. Jay Hall now lives in this same house. They were a happy couple. My father always being very considerate of my mother. My father was always refined and cultured. It has been said that he never passed a lady on the street that he didn’t raise his hat. He was a self made man and taught school, the first place being Notom, Utah also in the upper part of the county. Berta Okerlund Oldroyd said that he was one of the best teachers that she ever had. Aunt Arilla Brown Peterson (my father’s sister) said he was gifted as an artist and made many beautiful paintings. He was also deputy sheriff. He was a fluent speaker, and was well read. He worked at the legislature in Salt Lake City and enjoyed it very much. He was a farmer. He was the first person to be operated on in the LDS Hospital for the outlet of the stomach to be changed from one side to the other. That was about 42 years ago and the operation was successful. My parents were kind and always tried to give us children everything they could. My parents bought the Hotel from my Grandmother Brown (Pauline Grover Brown) the place where I now live. My mother run the hotel there for many years as well as take care of her children. She was noted for her very good cooking, especially her soup, apricot pie, and strawberry short cake. Carbine lights were installed in this hotel by our father. They were the first to have a radio with a battery and loud speaker in a cabinet set in the county. Ed Ellett of Fremont had the first set with battery and earphones. Aunt Jennie Bastian Mansfield tells of mother (Phoebe) doing her relief Block teaching, carrying her babies, and also other church activities the Primary and Sunday School. Her father was in the bishopric for twelve years being ordained November 6, 1910. My mother’s father Jacob S. Bastian supervised the building of the Johnson Valley Reservoir. My mother was sick the last few days of her life with pre anemia and was in and out of the hospital for 10 years, but her children and her home was never neglected. It has been said that she was so neat and clean that she has even left her bed long enough to wipe off her floors and tidy up the house. My father and mother were blessed with five children. LaVor being the oldest born January 9, 1906 at Loa, Utah. He later married Mae(y) Taylor April 2, 1928 and is the father of seven children Owona, Arlen LaVor, Fremon Earl, Dale J., Myrna, Erma, and Lois Ann. Marion Alonzo born October 16, 1908 married Melda Deleeuw September 30, 1935 and is the father of six children, five living and one dead, Boyd, Evelyn, girl not named dead, Albert Neil, Marion J., Gladys. Marjorie born June 27, 1918 is married to Hearold Erickson June 2, 1937 and is the mother of three children, two living and one dead, Hearold Sheril (dead), Merlin ElRoy and Ronald Kay. Fremon Antone born October 27, 1920 married to Ethel Hopkins July 11, 1946 and is the father of four boys Fremon ElRoy, Samuel Lee, Paul Eugene, and Darwin Antone. Donna Jane born December 14, 1924 married to Reed Torgerson Lindsey and is the mother of four children, two living and two dead. The first baby died at birth. The second one lived long enough to be named Stephen. The two living are Sheldon Reed and Marylin (Marlyn). My mother died September 11, 1935 leaving us all at home but LaVor and he was married. Being the oldest I had to take the responsibility of the home, father and younger brothers and sisters. I would have been much harder if it hadn’t been for good neighbors such as Annie Oyler, Clive Mathis, Jennie Taylor, Thelma Blackburn, Ada Taylor bringing my mother a quart of buttermilk every time she churned. Lola Anderson and Mollie and Doc. Blackwood also helped. Dr. Eddie Brinkerhoff of Bicknell did a lot for mother. She often would say he looked just like an angel. When my mother was so terrible sick I will never forget the kindness of my aunts. Aunt Gergia would take her to Idaho, Aunt Annie Mansfield would take her to Bingham, and Aunt Treana would take her into her home, each hoping that the change would make her feel better. One time when LaVor brought her from Bingham in February the roads were slick and it stormed all the way home. When LaVor carried her in her home and set her in her rocking chair, she looked up at him and smiled and said, “With all the slick roads you were the best driver in the world. You never made one bobble.” LaVor trucking to Richfield had the responsibility of bringing her medicine each week. The medicine was very expensive and nasty. After she died we found bottles of it hid around the house, because she couldn’t bring herself to take it. My father died four years later on August 10, 1939 of a heart attact(k). LaVor and his two little boys Arlen and Earl found him dead. LaVor was taking the two boys to stay with him as the next day he was going to Salina to take a D.U.P. float for their home coming, but he never got to go. All of us were married except Anthone and Donna. Anthone lived with May and LaVor and Donna lived with Aunt Treana.

History of Fredrick Elroy and Phoebe Harriet Bastian Brown

Colaborador: Diane_R Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Living in an era that was hard on any family during the early 1900’s, this family was wrought with more than their fair share of hardships-lacking money and illinesses and yet they rose above it all to become prominent people within their little community of Loa. Fredrick Elroy or Roy as most called him was a hard worker, born into a family of nine children in Salt Lake City, Utah on January 29, 1876. The family moved from Salt Lake to Lehi where at the time his father Charles worked on the railroad. In 1888, when Elroy was twelve years old, the family consisting of six members then, moved to Loa to be farmers. Elroy then served a mission to the Northern States. Terrihote, Indiana was his headquarters, this area included Indiana and Illinois. Margorie wrote of her father, “My father was always refined and cultured. It has been said that he never passed a lady on the street that he didn’t raise his hat. He was a self-made man and taught school, the first place being Notom, Utah also in the upper part of the county. Berta Okerlund Oldroyd said that he was one of the best teachers that she ever had. Aunt Arilla Brown Peterson (my father’s sister) said he was gifted as an artist and made many beautiful paintings. He was also deputy sheriff. He was a fluent speaker, and was well read.” Phoebe was born in Washington City, Utah on June 2, 1883 coming from Danish decent. Margorie wrote in Phoebe’s history that “she was about four years old when she moved to Loa in the fall of 1887. It was so hot and dry down in Washington County that the people were having chills and fever. My grandmother (Harriet) was advised by her Dr. to go to a higher climate. The water was scarce so my grandfather (Jacob) was ready to move. . . when they first came to Loa to live their home was on the farm that is now owned by Harold Johansen. Being early pioneers of Wayne County she would have to help grub the brush, herd the cattle and do other hard work as well as house work for other people. She had to work very hard. She would help her father with the farm work and go into peoples and work every time any one needed help. I am told that she was a good worker and worked very fast. She was as neat as a pin. She had lots of boyfriends and always loved to dance. She was especially a good dancer and took prizes for waltzing. Many a night she would walk into town for a dance, and after the dance she would walk home, a distance of two miles. Many of her friends can remember the long black stockings that the girls all wore and when they found a hole in the leg of them they would black the hole with soot taken from the lid of the cook stove and my mother (Phoebe) was no different than the rest. . . My mother used to sing in the Choir and she would go along with Brother William C. Potter Sr. and Pauline Grover Brown to Blue Valley in a wagon to sing and play for conference.” Phoebe and her sisters Trena and Vina always decorated the Tabernacle for funerals. Margorie also wrote that, “There was only one teacher, Sarah Ann Lazenby, in Loa when my mother went to school. She only went as far as the sixth grade as there were no grades higher in Loa at the time. They were not called graded at that time. The art class was the first grade (reader), the second reader, and so on until the sixth reader. . .” “When she started to go with my father, Aunt Jennie (Phoebe’s sister) said you could tell right from the beginning that my father’s intention toward my mother was serious. It was almost love from there first date. He would bring his white top buggy over to the farm and get my mother and take her to the dances and parties. After a year and a half of courtship they were married in the Manti Temple. They went in a white top buggy.” Elroy and Phoebe were married March 15, 1905 and later had their endowments taken out in the Salt Lake Temple. “ My mother had a beautiful wedding dress made of white bridal satin. It was made by Pauline Brown, her mother-in-law and she was a beautiful bride. At this time in my grandfather’s life he was considered quite well to do. As a gift he gave a cow and a mare. My father bought a beautiful new dark suit,” Margorie wrote of the marriage. “Our first home was down where Lloyd Peterson lives, down there and we had three rooms and an upstairs and me and Lon slept upstairs. In the wintertime it was so cold up there it would about freeze us to death. Dr. Nelson, a doctor that lived here, by the name of Dr. Nelson, lived right across the road from us there in that place of Chappell’s and if it hadn’t been for him letin’ me and Lon chop his wood and get it in for him and do his chores we wouldn’t a had a bit of spendin’ money cause my folks had no money. My Dad would farm this little old farm over here on the east side and he would raise enough to feed 3 or 4 little cows and a couple of horses and he didn’t hardly make enough to pay for the taxes,” LaVor said. Elroy and Phoebe had five children, LaVor in 1906, then Marion Alonzo “Lon or Lonnie” in 1908, Margorie in 1918, Freemon Antone “Tone” in 1920, and Dona Jane in 1924. Elroy served as a county officer as Attorney from 1911 - 1913. In June of 1912 Elroy along with, George A. Chappell, W. H. Heaps, and John H. Curfew were all sent to Logan on $100 expenses to attend an Intermountain Good Roads Convention. Through this endeaver they would iron out the problems they had with roads intersecting with irrigation ditches and canals, and would eventually bring about construction of “good” bridges in the county. In 1917 when World War I broke out, the Utah State Council of Defence supervised an effort to support the war at home. Each county had its own organization similiar to the state council. Amongst those serving was Elroy who served as secretary of Transportation, not surprising because of his earlier experience. “Then Grandpa Brown (Charles Albert) died (1924) and then Grandma Brown (Pauline) got so old she could hardly run the place that Margorie owns. So Dad bought it, traded our home down there to Grandma Brown and gave her $800 for this big home up here. Then we moved up here and Mother (Phoebe) run a hotel. And I have washed many a tub full of sheets on a washboard for Mother, because Mother was sick all the time, she couldn’t hardly do nothin’. She run a hotel there and she’d get quite a bit of business,” LaVor said. This gave Elroy and Phoebe an opportunity to make more money by running the hotel and it also provided a larger home for their family. Phoebe took over the place running the hotel. “There were lots of drummers (salesman) going through the county, comin’ through the stores here, Scott McCellan’s store, and stores around Bicknell and what few there was here. There’d be drummers comin’ to the hotel and they’d come and stay at Mother’s. There’d be cow buyers and lamb buyers, they’d always come there to the hotel n’ stay, and Mother kept me and Lon in spending money,” LaVor said. Times were hard for this family, especially in the winter when Elroy would leave and go to Salt Lake to work in the Legislature as a House Sargeant. He took care of all the calls on the telephone wire for the Legislature, and when the Legislature was out Elroy would come back home for a day or two and then go back. That left the older boys LaVor and Lon to tend to the everyday needs of the household. But these boys, LaVor and Lon being two years apart were inseparable, and still found time to pull antics young boys were apt to pull as you will read later. “A Dr. Foust, a dentist from Ogden, had come and moved down here, come down here to do dentistry work and he rented two of Mother’s rooms over there. And set up his office in there and took care of the people here with their teeth, and I know she took care of him and washed his clothes and fed him, and washed his dentistry clothing and took care of him. When she got her check, I know she bought me the nicest plaid overcoat and I thought it was the grandest thing I ever had in my life. She always made it a point, always had a dollar, she always had fifty cents or a dollar that she could give me and Lon for a dance ticket or a show ticket or something like that, she always had a little money,” LaVor said. She would have surely bought similiar gifts for the rest of her children with the extra money she made. Phoebe wasn’t very strong, for later she developed prenecias anemia meaning “no blood.” Every spring and fall, she would be in the hospital to build her blood up so she could carry on another six months. For the condition she would get pills, very expensive pills, to help build her blood up. The pills were made from the lining of a pigs stomach, “they were the rottenist stuff you ever tasted. . . I’ve seen Mother, it seemed to me like she had to stir it up or something and swallow it and I’ve seen her swallow it and throw it up and catch it in a cup then she would swallow it again. I’ve seen her do that two or three times before I seen her keep that medicine down. Because it was so expensive she couldn’t afford to see it go out on the floor or the ground.” LaVor said. During these two years LaVor was trucking to Richfield, he would bring her medicine back, at a cost of $5 per dose. After Phoebe had died, they found bottles of it hidden around the house because it was so bitter and hard to take. Six months after her death, they found they could give blood transfusions and shots that were still on the cutting edge of medical technology at this time, and would have been her Savior. In April 1928, their son LaVor married May Taylor and soon gave them their first grandchild, Owona. Later came Arlie, Earl, Dale, Myrna, Erma and Lois Ann a total of seven children. It was during the depression that many men and their adult sons sought work at the Bingham Mine in Salt Lake City, Elroy and Lon were no exception and left LaVor and May to take care of Phoebe while they were away working. “He (Lonnie) worked hard and sent most of his paycheck home to his mother . . . money was always needed,” Melda wrote in Lonnie’s history. LaVor said, “Mother was sick over there in the house and she quit runnin’ the hotel and she was right down in bed and May would go over there every night and morning and bath Mother (Phoebe) and put her to bed. Them days Dr. Brinkerhoff was the doctor then and we’d call him when it looked like Mother was a dying, and we’d call Dr. Brinkerhoff and he’d come and he’d just sit down on the edge of the bed with Mother and just talk to her, rub her hands and talk to her and she’d come right out of it, he wouldn’t have to give her any medicine or anything.” Then in August 1935 Lon married Melda DeLeeuw. Through this marriage five children were born, three boys and two girls-Boyd, Evelyn, Niel, Marion, and Gladys. Then the inevitable happened, Phoebe died at 7:30 p.m., September 11, 1935 at 52 years of age. Phoebe left behind two young daughters and a son, Margorie was 17 years old, Tone was 15 years old, and Dona just 11 years old. “That night was supposed to be my brother Lonnie and Melda’s wedding dance and reception they had been married for a week . . . I was in the bath tub when they told me and I couldn’t believe it, so I ran and got in bed with her,” Dona wrote in her history. After Phoebe died, the two girls and Tone lived with their Dad until 1937. Margorie married Hearold and moved to Koosherm and Dona went to live with Aunt Trena (Phoebe’s sister). “Dad was upset because he said I would have to work too hard and see to much. Everynight after my work was done I would go and see Dad. Some nights I would stay with him and my brother Tone,” Dona wrote. May would make Elroy pies, cakes, and bread. “Dad done his own cookin and he made the best soup you ever tasted in your life,” LaVor remembered,“ he had a big black pot kettle he used to cook in. Elroy soon became sick also, having had trouble with his stomach, he’d had several operations in the L.D.S. Hospital. They changed the outlet of his stomach to the other side. But he wasn’t able to work because he was sick all the time. Soon he was losing ground and died at 8 O’clock at the age of 62 years. Margorie wrote, “My father died four years later (after Phoebe) on August 10, 1939 of a heart attact(k). LaVor and his two little boys Arlen and Earl found him dead. LaVor was taking the two boys to stay with him as the next day he was going to Salina to take a D.U.P. float for their home coming, but he never got to go.” When Elroy died Tone moved in with LaVor and May at the Robison Ranch and “went driving truck into Salt Lake City for the Utah Poultry and LaVor and Lon,” Tone wrote in his history. Elroy willed the house to the girls Margorie and Dona. Margorie lives there today (2006). Margorie and Hearold later returned to live at her parents home. From this marriage three sons were born Sheryl, Merlin and Kay. Sheryl died at the young age of 16 from a brain tumor in 1953. Then in 1978 Margorie buried her husband Hearold from cancer after 41 years of marriage. Later she married Vern Mott. In 1942 World War II broke out. Tone was working at Hill Air Force Base and was drafted into service November 5, 1942. “I went to California for my basic training. From there I was shipped to Sharon, Pennsylvania, this is where I met my wife Ethel Hopkins. . . I was sent over seas, never being granted a furlough back home. I spent almost three years over seas. The day I got ready to come home, I broke my leg. This detained me in Italy for another six months. I went all through Africa, Sicily and Italy. I was with the 3195th Signal Company,” Tone wrote. Ethel eventually would catch a train to Richfield and make it to Loa to the man she loved and they would marry July 11, 1946, nearly a year after the war ended. Through this union four sons were born Roy, Sam, Paul, and Darwin. Dona met and married Reed Lindsey in the Manti Temple in June 1946. “Our first son was born August 26, 1948 in Salina Hospital. He was stillborn. . . Two years later, June 13, 1950 our second son, Steven Reed was born. . . He was also a beautiful baby. He lived one day,” Dona wrote. Later, after consulting a doctor he told them if they would consent to a Cesaren Section he was sure he could save their next child. So they tried and the results were a boy, Sheldon and a girl, Marilyn. Dona and Reed have lived most their married lives in Provo, Utah. Elroy and Phoebe are both buried at the Loa Cemetery.

Life timeline of Marion Alonzo Brown

1908
Marion Alonzo Brown was born on 16 Oct 1908
Marion Alonzo Brown was 6 years old when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated by a Yugoslav nationalist named Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, sparking the outbreak of World War I. Archduke Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria-Este was a member of the imperial Habsburg dynasty, and from 1896 until his death the heir presumptive (Thronfolger) to the Austro-Hungarian throne. His assassination in Sarajevo precipitated Austria-Hungary's declaration of war against Serbia, which in turn triggered a series of events that resulted in Austria-Hungary's allies and Serbia's declaring war on each other, starting World War I.
Marion Alonzo Brown was 21 years old when The New York Stock Exchange crashes in what will be called the Crash of '29 or "Black Tuesday", ending the Great Bull Market of the 1920s and beginning the Great Depression. The New York Stock Exchange, is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world's largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$21.3 trillion as of June 2017. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.
Marion Alonzo Brown was 22 years old when Great Depression: In a State of the Union message, U.S. President Herbert Hoover proposes a $150 million (equivalent to $2,197,000,000 in 2017) public works program to help generate jobs and stimulate the economy. The Great Depression was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.
Marion Alonzo Brown was 37 years old when World War II: Nagasaki is devastated when an atomic bomb, Fat Man, is dropped by the United States B-29 Bockscar. Thirty-five thousand people are killed outright, including 23,200-28,200 Japanese war workers, 2,000 Korean forced workers, and 150 Japanese soldiers. Nagasaki is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan. The city's name, 長崎, means "long cape" in Japanese. Nagasaki became a centre of colonial Portuguese and Dutch influence in the 16th through 19th centuries, and the Hidden Christian Sites in the Nagasaki Region have been recognized and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Part of Nagasaki was home to a major Imperial Japanese Navy base during the First Sino-Japanese War and Russo-Japanese War.
Marion Alonzo Brown was 49 years old when Space Race: Launch of Sputnik 1, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth. The Space Race refers to the 20th-century competition between two Cold War rivals, the Soviet Union (USSR) and the United States (US), for dominance in spaceflight capability. It had its origins in the missile-based nuclear arms race between the two nations that occurred following World War II, aided by captured German missile technology and personnel from the Aggregat program. The technological superiority required for such dominance was seen as necessary for national security, and symbolic of ideological superiority. The Space Race spawned pioneering efforts to launch artificial satellites, uncrewed space probes of the Moon, Venus, and Mars, and human spaceflight in low Earth orbit and to the Moon.
Marion Alonzo Brown was 56 years old when Martin Luther King Jr. received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence. Martin Luther King Jr. was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the civil rights movement from 1954 until his death in 1968. Born in Atlanta, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, tactics his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi helped inspire.
Marion Alonzo Brown died on 12 Jan 1970 at the age of 61
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Marion Alonzo Brown (16 Oct 1908 - 12 Jan 1970), BillionGraves Record 3912541 Loa, Wayne, Utah, United States

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