Ralph Kenneth Henderson

29 Sep 1925 - 22 May 2001

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Ralph Kenneth Henderson

29 Sep 1925 - 22 May 2001
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History of Ralph Kenneth Henderson By Himself Son of James Henderson and Elsie Irene Chytraus (Chytraeus). Born September 29th, 1925 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA It is difficult to write about oneself. I suppose the earliest thing I can remember is the time Mom and Dad acquired a n
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Life Information

Ralph Kenneth Henderson

Nasceu:
Casado(a): 14 Jun 1948
Morreu:

Mount Olivet Cemetery

Garden Tomb Way
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah
United States
Copista

utourdoctor

May 19, 2017
Fotógrafo

utourdoctor

May 13, 2017

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Ralph Henderson

Colaborador: utourdoctor Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

History of Ralph Kenneth Henderson By Himself Son of James Henderson and Elsie Irene Chytraus (Chytraeus). Born September 29th, 1925 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA It is difficult to write about oneself. I suppose the earliest thing I can remember is the time Mom and Dad acquired a new couch for the living room. Prior to that I remember a couch with a leather cover. This new couch was covered with cloth and was pretty besides the old couch. My mother claims I was three years old when she purchased this new couch. It’s interesting what a person first remembers. Many years later when Betty and I were married we acquired this new couch and used it for seven or eight years. It was during an economic depression that I had my childhood. Fortunately I was not one of its victims. My father had started in business and always amply supplied us with food. Yet in the neighborhood we had many destitute families whom my mother used to help feed. There were the Naylors, and the Erskines, and the Lundquists. People were fortunate to have employment. I’ve never known what it is like to be hungry and I feel that has been always one of God’s choicest blessings to me. I remember my first day of school. Mom sent me up with my sister Beverly. The room was down a 25 foot hallway. There stood the teacher. Beverly pointed me on my way and said to go in. That’s as far as I stepped that day. Beverly finally had to leave me to go to her class and I sat out in the hallway for four hours until she came to get me for lunchtime. I learned later to adore my kindergarten class teacher and she will always have a fond spot in my heart. My school was Hamilton, named after the great revolutionary patriot. It was located at 8th South and 8th East and was later torn down in 1976 because it was surplus to the school district. At 8 years of age I was baptized in the Salt Lake Tabernacle. I remember taking some near white pajamas. There were some of my friends from school. It was embarrassing to me to be in pajamas in front of some of the girls from school. I mattered not that they were in the same clothing. Boyer Carter did the ordinance. The following day was fast day. I was to be confirmed. Never having been in the chapel, I wandered up to be confirmed after junior Sunday School. I peeped through the doors. I could see this big room with lots of strange faces. I saw my mother near the front row. I hesitated, then fear overcame me and I stood outside in the hall. Finally some one came for me and took me up and confirmed me a member of the Church. Scared I was – did I cry in the hall again, yes. Security has always been one of my needs. Carefreeness is not one of my traits. After seven years in grade school, I commenced junior high. It was Roosevelt Junior High, named after Teddy Roosevelt the rough rider. This was a difficult period in my life as my friends started into puberty much earlier than I. They grew and developed. I was sort of fat and not too tall. It was difficult for me to compete socially and physically. It was sort of an inferiority complex that I later learned to overcome in comfortable conditions. After Roosevelt Junior High school I attended East High school until I graduated at 16 years of age. I went in at 5 foot seven inch and came out six foot three inches tall. Each night I would pray to grow and when I did I grew. In this period I waned in my church activity by non-attendance. Fortunately the teachings of my parents and church leaders assisted me in maintaining standards such as the Word of Wisdom and chastity. My brother Claude wondered why I didn’t go the graduation dance from East, but it really didn’t interest me. Social pressures must be difficult on all teenagers and letting them develop as they want is probably the best course when raising children. My first friends during high school were Ed Brown and Eldon Lundberg. We went everywhere together – from football to fishing. The Saturday night show was a usual occurrence. We would sometimes pool our 10c for bus fare and ride in a cab until the 30c was used up, then walk home at night in the dark. Eldon had to walk two miles, Ed and I one block – good old “Eldie” never complained. We had neighborhood football teams, baseball teams and wore out a pair of shoes frequently playing basketball in our own back yard. Each night after school we would play football on the grass on 6th East or basketball in our backyard from four PM to six PM, then Mom’s familiar call to come to dinner changed my direction. Each childhood experience shapes a person’s life a little bit. There was hardly anything we didn’t do. Marbles, kites, tops, yo-yos, bikes, elastic guns, toys, swimming, wrestling, cops and robbers, movies, fishing, camping, fighting (I always lost), and any other activity to be named we seemed to engage in. I remember learning to ride my first big bike. I had a small bike with a 9 or 10 inch wheels, so getting on my brother’s bike – a 26” wheeler – was something. He had no brakes, so in order to stop you had to push in reverse on the pedals or put your shoe in the front tire. I got up and rode alright, but I chose the latter for stopping. Putting your shoe on the front tire allowed my foot to wedge between the forks (or tines) of the front wheel. Not only did I stop abruptly, but my foot felt like it was broken and as I went over the handle bars my body felt like it was broken. Writing about teen-age experiences bring back my memories – some of are importance and others inconsequential – but thankful I am for the steady course and direction set by my parents. I sense children have a way of knowing whether their parents are honorable people. I sensed mine were very early and I was blessed in having both parents all my life until I was in my forties. While being a deacon or teacher it was usual for Mother to have two cakes and pies consumed by the “after-church” group. Joyce, Beverly and myself always seemed to invite friends over. This practice resumed years later as my own children looked forward to going over to Grandma’s for night snacks and visiting. I graduated from East High school in the spring of 1942. During previous summers I had worked for my father in the wheel and parts business. World War II had started in 1939 and the USA had become part of it when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor Hawaii in 1941. Not being of draft age, I entered college shortly before my 17th birthday – I managed a year and one quarter attending the University of Utah before going in the Navy.

Things I am Thankful For

Colaborador: utourdoctor Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

(Written on stationery from the Cancun Mexico Sheraton Hotel) THINGS I’M THANKFUL FOR – not in any order – just as they came. 1.Health – not as good gut good enough to enjoy it. 2.Living in the U.S.A. – freedom from a police state is really a blessing. I even agree with a President every year or two. 3.Having children who are straight and honest. 4.Having been taught in school by teachers who liked to teach. 5.A father who always provided and a mother who liked being a homemaker. 6.Being taught to be frugal and live within my means. It has been so much easier. 7.Being smart enough to learn by others’ experiences and not the hard way all of the time. 8.Finding out at last, that “popular” people in high school were not snobs – I was just socially undeveloped. 9.What I lack in brain power I can overcome by determination and work habits. 10.Others may become hurt if there is a way to make more money than by just plain work. Pick and shovel work. 11.Having earned sufficient money – though not always enough – that my wife could stay home and be with the family. 12.Mrs. Andrus who taught me Sunday School when I was seven. 13.Being able to laugh at experiences passed that seemed so difficult. Yet now, I like to repeat telling those stories. 14.Almost three years in the Navy, and the growing up it gave me. 15.God’s watchful eye over my life. He really looks after me.

Ralph Henderson

Colaborador: utourdoctor Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

History of Ralph Kenneth Henderson By Himself Son of James Henderson and Elsie Irene Chytraus (Chytraeus). Born September 29th, 1925 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA It is difficult to write about oneself. I suppose the earliest thing I can remember is the time Mom and Dad acquired a new couch for the living room. Prior to that I remember a couch with a leather cover. This new couch was covered with cloth and was pretty besides the old couch. My mother claims I was three years old when she purchased this new couch. It’s interesting what a person first remembers. Many years later when Betty and I were married we acquired this new couch and used it for seven or eight years. It was during an economic depression that I had my childhood. Fortunately I was not one of its victims. My father had started in business and always amply supplied us with food. Yet in the neighborhood we had many destitute families whom my mother used to help feed. There were the Naylors, and the Erskines, and the Lundquists. People were fortunate to have employment. I’ve never known what it is like to be hungry and I feel that has been always one of God’s choicest blessings to me. I remember my first day of school. Mom sent me up with my sister Beverly. The room was down a 25 foot hallway. There stood the teacher. Beverly pointed me on my way and said to go in. That’s as far as I stepped that day. Beverly finally had to leave me to go to her class and I sat out in the hallway for four hours until she came to get me for lunchtime. I learned later to adore my kindergarten class teacher and she will always have a fond spot in my heart. My school was Hamilton, named after the great revolutionary patriot. It was located at 8th South and 8th East and was later torn down in 1976 because it was surplus to the school district. At 8 years of age I was baptized in the Salt Lake Tabernacle. I remember taking some near white pajamas. There were some of my friends from school. It was embarrassing to me to be in pajamas in front of some of the girls from school. I mattered not that they were in the same clothing. Boyer Carter did the ordinance. The following day was fast day. I was to be confirmed. Never having been in the chapel, I wandered up to be confirmed after junior Sunday School. I peeped through the doors. I could see this big room with lots of strange faces. I saw my mother near the front row. I hesitated, then fear overcame me and I stood outside in the hall. Finally some one came for me and took me up and confirmed me a member of the Church. Scared I was – did I cry in the hall again, yes. Security has always been one of my needs. Carefreeness is not one of my traits. After seven years in grade school, I commenced junior high. It was Roosevelt Junior High, named after Teddy Roosevelt the rough rider. This was a difficult period in my life as my friends started into puberty much earlier than I. They grew and developed. I was sort of fat and not too tall. It was difficult for me to compete socially and physically. It was sort of an inferiority complex that I later learned to overcome in comfortable conditions. After Roosevelt Junior High school I attended East High school until I graduated at 16 years of age. I went in at 5 foot seven inch and came out six foot three inches tall. Each night I would pray to grow and when I did I grew. In this period I waned in my church activity by non-attendance. Fortunately the teachings of my parents and church leaders assisted me in maintaining standards such as the Word of Wisdom and chastity. My brother Claude wondered why I didn’t go the graduation dance from East, but it really didn’t interest me. Social pressures must be difficult on all teenagers and letting them develop as they want is probably the best course when raising children. My first friends during high school were Ed Brown and Eldon Lundberg. We went everywhere together – from football to fishing. The Saturday night show was a usual occurrence. We would sometimes pool our 10c for bus fare and ride in a cab until the 30c was used up, then walk home at night in the dark. Eldon had to walk two miles, Ed and I one block – good old “Eldie” never complained. We had neighborhood football teams, baseball teams and wore out a pair of shoes frequently playing basketball in our own back yard. Each night after school we would play football on the grass on 6th East or basketball in our backyard from four PM to six PM, then Mom’s familiar call to come to dinner changed my direction. Each childhood experience shapes a person’s life a little bit. There was hardly anything we didn’t do. Marbles, kites, tops, yo-yos, bikes, elastic guns, toys, swimming, wrestling, cops and robbers, movies, fishing, camping, fighting (I always lost), and any other activity to be named we seemed to engage in. I remember learning to ride my first big bike. I had a small bike with a 9 or 10 inch wheels, so getting on my brother’s bike – a 26” wheeler – was something. He had no brakes, so in order to stop you had to push in reverse on the pedals or put your shoe in the front tire. I got up and rode alright, but I chose the latter for stopping. Putting your shoe on the front tire allowed my foot to wedge between the forks (or tines) of the front wheel. Not only did I stop abruptly, but my foot felt like it was broken and as I went over the handle bars my body felt like it was broken. Writing about teen-age experiences bring back my memories – some of are importance and others inconsequential – but thankful I am for the steady course and direction set by my parents. I sense children have a way of knowing whether their parents are honorable people. I sensed mine were very early and I was blessed in having both parents all my life until I was in my fourties. While being a deacon or teacher it was usual for Mother to have two cakes and pies consumed by the “after-church” group. Joyce, Beverly and myself always seemed to invite friends over. This practice resumed years later as my own children looked forward to going over to Grandma’s for night snacks and visiting. I graduated from East High school in the spring of 1942. During previous summers I had worked for my father in the wheel and parts business. World War II had started in 1939 and the USA had become part of it when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor Hawaii in 1941. Not being of draft age, I entered college shortly before my 17th birthday – I managed a year and one quarter attending the University of Utah before going in the Navy.

Young Ralph

Colaborador: utourdoctor Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

History of Ralph Kenneth Henderson By Himself Son of James Henderson and Elsie Irene Chytraus (Chytraeus). Born September 29th, 1925 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA It is difficult to write about oneself. I suppose the earliest thing I can remember is the time Mom and Dad acquired a new couch for the living room. Prior to that I remember a couch with a leather cover. This new couch was covered with cloth and was pretty besides the old couch. My mother claims I was three years old when she purchased this new couch. It’s interesting what a person first remembers. Many years later when Betty and I were married we acquired this new couch and used it for seven or eight years. It was during an economic depression that I had my childhood. Fortunately I was not one of its victims. My father had started in business and always amply supplied us with food. Yet in the neighborhood we had many destitute families whom my mother used to help feed. There were the Naylors, and the Erskines, and the Lundquists. People were fortunate to have employment. I’ve never known what it is like to be hungry and I fell that has been always one of God’s choicest blessings to me. I remember my first day of school. Mom sent me up with my sister Beverly. The room was down a 25 foot hallway. There stood the teacher. Beverly pointed me on my way and said to go in. That’s as far as I stepped that day. Beverly finally had to leave me to go to her class and I sat out in the hallway for four hours until she came to get me for lunchtime. I learned later to adore my kindergarten class teacher and she will always have a fond spot in my heart. My school was Hamilton, named after the great revolutionary patriot. It was located at 8th South and 8th East and was later torn down in 1976 because it was surplus to the school district. At 8 years of age I was baptized in the Salt Lake Tabernacle. I remember taking some near white pajamas. There were some of my friends from school. It was embarassing to me to be in pajamas in front of some of the girls from school. I mattered not that they were in the same clothing. Boyer Carter did the ordinance. The following day was fast day. I was to be confirmed. Never having been in the chapel, I wandered up to be confirmed after junior Sunday School. I peeped through the doors. I could see this big room with lots of strange faces. I saw my mother near the front row. I hesitated, then fear overcame me and I stood outside in the hall. Finally some one came for me and took me up and confirmed me a member of the Church. Scared I was – did I cry in the hall again, yes. Security has always been one of my needs. Carefreeness is not one of my traits. After seven years in grade school, I commenced junior high. It was Roosevelt Junior High, named after Teddy Roosevelt the rough rider. This was a difficult period in my life as my friends started into puberty much earlier than I. They grew and developed. I was sort of fat and not too tall. It was difficult for me to compete socially and physically. It was sort of an inferiority complex that I later learned to overcome in comfortable conditions. After Roosevelt Junior High school I attended East High school until I graduated at 16 years of age. I went in at 5 foot seven inch and came out six foot three inches tall. Each night I would pray to grow and when I did I grew. In this period I waned in my church activity by non-attendance. Fortunately the teachings of my parents and church leaders assisted me in maintaining standards such as the Word of Wisdom and chastity. My brother Claude wondered why I didn’t go the graduation dance from East, but it really didn’t interest me. Social pressures must be difficult on all teenagers and letting them develop as they want is probably the best course when raising children. My first friends during high school were Ed Brown and Eldon Lundberg. We went everywhere together – from football to fishing. The Saturday night show was a usual occurrence. We would sometimes pool our 10c for bus fare and ride in a cab until the 30c was used up, then walk home at night in the dark. Eldon had to walk two miles, Ed and I one block – good old “Eldie” never complained. We had neighborhood football teams, baseball teams and wore out a pair of shoes frequently playing basketball in our own back yard. Each night after school we would play football on the grass on 6th East or basketball in our backyard from four PM to six PM, then Mom’s familiar call to come to dinner changed my direction. Each childhood experience shapes a person’s life a little bit. There was hardly anything we didn’t do. Marbles, kites, tops, yo-yos, bikes, elastic guns, toys, swimming, wrestling, cops and robbers, movies, fishing, camping, fighting (I always lost), and any other activity to be named we seemed to engage in. I remember learning to ride my first big bike. I had a small bike with a 9 or 10 inch wheels, so getting on my brother’s bike – a 26” wheeler – was something. He had no brakes, so in order to stop you had to push in reverse on the pedals or put your shoe in the front tire. I got up and rode alright, but I chose the latter for stopping. Putting your shoe on the front tire allowed my foot to wedge between the forks (or tines) of the front wheel. Not only did I stop abruptly, but my foot felt like it was broken and as I went over the handle bars my body felt like it was broken. Writing about teen-age experiences bring back my memories – some of are importance and others inconsequential – but thankful I am for the steady course and direction set by my parents. I sense children have a way of knowing whether their parents are honorable people. I sensed mine were very early and I was blessed in having both parents all my life until I was in my fourties. While being a deacon or teacher it was usual for Mother to have two cakes and pies consumed by the “after-church” group. Joyce, Beverly and myself always seemed to invite friends over. This practice resumed years later as my own children looked forward to going over to Grandma’s for night snacks and visiting. I graduated from East High school in the spring of 1942. During previous summers I had worked for my father in the wheel and parts business. World War II had started in 1939 and the USA had become part of it when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor Hawaii in 1941. Not being of draft age, I entered college shortly before my 17th birthday – I managed a year and one quarter attending the University of Utah before going in the Navy.

Ralph Things I am Thankful For

Colaborador: utourdoctor Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

(Written on stationery from the Cancun Mexico Sheraton Hotel) THINGS I’M THANKFUL FOR – not in any order – just as they came. 1.Health – not as good gut good enough to enjoy it. 2.Living in the U.S.A. – freedom from a police state is really a blessing. I even agree with a President every year or two. 3.Having children who are straight and honest. 4.Having been taught in school by teachers who liked to teach. 5.A father who always provided and a mother who liked being a homemaker. 6.Being taught to be frugal and live within my means. It has been so much easier. 7.Being smart enough to learn by others’ experiences and not the hard way all of the time. 8.Finding out at last, that “popular” people in high school were not snobs – I was just socially undeveloped. 9.What I lack in brain power I can overcome by determination and work habits. 10.Others may become hurt if there is a way to make more money than by just plain work. Pick and shovel work. 11.Having earned sufficient money – though not always enough – that my wife could stay home and be with the family. 12.Mrs. Andrus who taught me Sunday School when I was seven. 13.Being able to laugh at experiences passed that seemed so difficult. Yet now, I like to repeat telling those stories. 14.Almost three years in the Navy, and the growing up it gave me. 15.God’s watchful eye over my life. He really looks after me.

Life timeline of Ralph Kenneth Henderson

1925
Ralph Kenneth Henderson was born on 29 Sep 1925
Ralph Kenneth Henderson was 14 years old when Adolf Hitler signs an order to begin the systematic euthanasia of mentally ill and disabled people. Adolf Hitler was a German politician, demagogue, and Pan-German revolutionary, who was the leader of the Nazi Party, Chancellor of Germany from 1933 to 1945 and Führer ("Leader") of Nazi Germany from 1934 to 1945. As dictator, Hitler initiated World War II in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust.
1939
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Ralph Kenneth Henderson was 20 years old when World War II: Hiroshima, Japan is devastated when the atomic bomb "Little Boy" is dropped by the United States B-29 Enola Gay. Around 70,000 people are killed instantly, and some tens of thousands die in subsequent years from burns and radiation poisoning. World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945, although conflicts reflecting the ideological clash between what would become the Allied and Axis blocs began earlier. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most global war in history; it directly involved more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. In a state of total war, the major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.
1945
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Ralph Kenneth Henderson was 28 years old when Jonas Salk announced the successful test of his polio vaccine on a small group of adults and children (vaccination pictured). Jonas Edward Salk was an American medical researcher and virologist. He discovered and developed one of the first successful polio vaccines. Born in New York City, he attended New York University School of Medicine, later choosing to do medical research instead of becoming a practicing physician. In 1939, after earning his medical degree, Salk began an internship as a physician scientist at Mount Sinai Hospital. Two years later he was granted a fellowship at the University of Michigan, where he would study flu viruses with his mentor Thomas Francis, Jr.
1953
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Ralph Kenneth Henderson was 44 years old when During the Apollo 11 mission, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the Moon. Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two people on the Moon. Mission commander Neil Armstrong and pilot Buzz Aldrin, both American, landed the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC. Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface six hours after landing on July 21 at 02:56:15 UTC; Aldrin joined him about 20 minutes later. They spent about two and a quarter hours together outside the spacecraft, and collected 47.5 pounds (21.5 kg) of lunar material to bring back to Earth. Michael Collins piloted the command module Columbia alone in lunar orbit while they were on the Moon's surface. Armstrong and Aldrin spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface before rejoining Columbia in lunar orbit.
1969
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Ralph Kenneth Henderson was 47 years old when Munich massacre: Nine Israeli athletes die (along with a German policeman) at the hands of the Palestinian "Black September" terrorist group after being taken hostage at the Munich Olympic Games. Two other Israeli athletes were slain in the initial attack the previous day. The Munich massacre was an attack during the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, West Germany, in which the Palestinian terrorist group Black September took eleven Israeli Olympic team members hostage and killed them along with a West German police officer.
1972
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Ralph Kenneth Henderson was 64 years old when Cold War: Fall of the Berlin Wall: East Germany opens checkpoints in the Berlin Wall, allowing its citizens to travel to West Berlin. The Berlin Wall was a guarded concrete barrier that physically and ideologically divided Berlin from 1961 to 1989. Constructed by the German Democratic Republic, starting on 13 August 1961, the Wall cut off West Berlin from virtually all of surrounding East Germany and East Berlin until government officials opened it in November 1989. Its demolition officially began on 13 June 1990 and finished in 1992. The barrier included guard towers placed along large concrete walls, accompanied by a wide area that contained anti-vehicle trenches, "fakir beds" and other defenses. The Eastern Bloc portrayed the Wall as protecting its population from fascist elements conspiring to prevent the "will of the people" in building a socialist state in East Germany.
1989
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Ralph Kenneth Henderson was 69 years old when The Rwandan genocide begins when the aircraft carrying Rwandan president Juvénal Habyarimana and Burundian president Cyprien Ntaryamira is shot down. The Rwandan genocide, also known as the genocide against the Tutsi, was a genocidal mass slaughter of Tutsi in Rwanda by members of the Hutu majority government. An estimated 500,000 to 1,000,000 Rwandans were killed during the 100-day period from 7 April to mid-July 1994, constituting as many as 70% of the Tutsi population. Additionally, 30% of the Pygmy Batwa were killed. The genocide and widespread slaughter of Rwandans ended when the Tutsi-backed and heavily armed Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) led by Paul Kagame took control of the country. An estimated 2,000,000 Rwandans, mostly Hutus, were displaced and became refugees.
1994
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Ralph Kenneth Henderson died on 22 May 2001 at the age of 75
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Ralph Kenneth Henderson (29 Sep 1925 - 22 May 2001), BillionGraves Record 23074907 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, United States

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