Richard J. Davis

3 Sep 1826 - 5 Oct 1892

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Richard J. Davis

3 Sep 1826 - 5 Oct 1892
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JOURNAL OF RICHARD DAVIS Translated into English from the original Welsh written in his own hand p.1 The journal of Richard Davis, son of William Davis. My mother’s name was Gwenllian. I was born in “Gynllwun du,” and I am one of nine children. The _________ died in 1838, August. And in the mo
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Life Information

Richard J. Davis

Nasceu:
Morreu:

Willard City Cemetery

Unnamed Rd
Willard, Box Elder, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Richard Born at Ystrad Parish, Glanmorgan Shire, South Wales Rebecca born at Llantwit Vardre Parish, Glanmorgan Shire, South Wales
Copista

BarbaraLeishman

September 13, 2013
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Thorsted

June 23, 2013

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Journal of Richard Jenkins Davis

Colaborador: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

JOURNAL OF RICHARD DAVIS Translated into English from the original Welsh written in his own hand p.1 The journal of Richard Davis, son of William Davis. My mother’s name was Gwenllian. I was born in “Gynllwun du,” and I am one of nine children. The _________ died in 1838, August. And in the month after that, i.e., September, I was born in the year 1826, and I am 26 years old as I write this account. There were 4 brothers and 5 girls. Their names are as follows: Margret, Mary, J____, William, Richard, Gwenllian, David Ann, Thomas. p.2 A journal giving a little of the story of my life. I am writing on 12 June 1852. My name is Richard j. Davis. I was born in the parish of Ystrad Pafodog in Glamorganshire in a place called “Cynllwun-du,” a farm in the parish. Now I shall proceed with the next thing, and first to give a little account of my ancestors. I have searched a lot for them but there are many things missing as yet, but I shall put down as much detail as I can according to what I know beginning with my gather and mother. p.3 My father and mother were married in the year ______ in the church of Ystrad. The name of the priest who married them was Richard Prichard. Nine children were born to them. I shall name them as follows beginning with the oldest. First, the three girls: first, Margret; 2nd, Marey; 3rd, Jane; 4th, William, the oldest brother; 5th, myself, my name is Richard as I said; 6th, Gwenllian, the 4th girl; 7th, David, the 3rd boy; 8th, Ann, the 5th girl; p.4 9th, Thomas, the 4th boy and the youngest. My father was buried when I was in my 14th year, i.e., in the year 1842, September the 5th, he died; on the 7th day he was placed in the grave in the cemetery of the meeting house of Baletys in front of the door of the meeting house in the Parish of Ystrad. I shall proceed to write the ancestors of my father first. p.5 My father was the son of David Jinkins, born in the Parish of Ystrad. He had four boys. I shall name them as follows: first, Jinkin; 2nd, William (i.e., my father); 3rd, Davidd; 4th, Thomas, the youngest brother. He had 3 daughters; 1st, Ann; 2nd, Jenat; ______ Mary; 3rd, Pegi. p.6 And I called Margret “Rit.” My grandfather was the son of Edwart Jinkins. He had 6 boys. I shall name them as follows: 1st Davidd (i.e., my grandfather); 2nd, Jinkin; 3rd, William; 4th, Thomas; 5th, Richard; 6th, Edwart; 7th, John. He had 4 daughters: 1st, Ann; 2nd, Ann 3rd, Mary; 4th, Chathren. Those are the children p.7 of Edwart Jinkins (i.e., their names). My fathers grandfather, Edwart Jinkines, i.e., my great grandfather, was the son of Thomas Jinkins. He had two sons, 1st, Edwart, i.e., my great grandfather; 2nd, Jinkin. I do not know if he had more or not. Thomas Jinkin had one brother, and his name was Edwart p.8 Jinkins. These two brothers came to the Parish of Ystrad from Cumnedd. I do now know when they came but Thomas Jinkins was buried in the year 1776. He lived in a place which was called Penrees in the Parish of Ystrad, but I do not know where he was buried. p.9 But my father and grandfather were buried in Ystrad. As I said about my father, I do now have any more information about the people of my father. I shall now write that which I know about the ancestors of me grandmother. She was the daughter of Jinkin Davies, (i.e., the mother of my father), born in Breconshire, Parish of Penderun. Jinkin Davies was p.10 the son of Dafudd Jinkin Dafudd, and he was the son of Jinkin Dafudd. Jinkin Dafudd had two sons, i.e., Dafudd and Richard. It appears that my father was the grandson who descended from Jinkin Dafudd. Jinkin Dafudd was the name of my father’s great grandfather also. That’s all I have to say about the family of my father’s mother as yet. Now I shall proceed p.11 to write the ancestors of my mother. She was the daughter of Richard Thomas of the Parish of Aberdare in Glamorganshire. He (i.e., my grandfather) is still living and turned 92 in February of this year, 1852. My grandmother’s name is Gwenllian. They were married in the Aberdare Church in 1793. She also is living and is 85 years old. p.12 They had 9 children. I shall name them as follows: 1st, Gwenllian (i.e., my mother); 2nd, Richard; 3rd, Mary, who died 2 July 1843 and was buried on the 5th day in the cemetery of the Baletins meetinghouse where it is called “Ynus fach ystrad tafodog,” the same cemetery as my father. She did not have any children. She was a very loveable woman. I was p.13 there when she died; I was between 10 and 11. And I missed her very much, and it was a loss to me and to my brothers and sisters, for she was good to us. Her husband was a very stingy man and he asked me what I would take to stay with him during the winter. I answered (softly) the same thing as anyone p.14 for that. And everyone said that he kept four pounds of money from me, and that if my aunt were alive I would have gotten the money. (I got 26 [shillings] for four months and a fortnight of work.) 4th, Thomas; 5th, David; 6th, Jane; 7th, Rees. He was buried when he was between four and five years old, and my father and he were put in the same grave in front of the door of the meetinghouse as I said. p.15 8th, Robert; 9th, Rees, the second to the youngest. These are the name of the children of Richard Thomas (i.e., my mother’s brother and sisters). Richard Thomas (my grandfather) was the son of Thomas Dafudd Miles. He had 9 children: 1st, Richard, who was buried when he was a year old. After that came the 2nd, Richard (my grandfather); the 3rd, Robert; 4th, Rees; the names of the daughters: 1st, p.16 Margret; 2nd, Marey; 3rd, Jane; 4th, Ann; 5th, Marey (the first died before naming the second); and those are the names of the children of Thomas Dafudd Miles. He was the son of Dafudd Miles. He had 7 children; their names are the following: 1st, Dafudd, 2nd, James; 3rd, Jane; 4th, Marey; 5th, Joan; 6th, Ann; 7th, Cathren. Those are the names of the children of Dafudd Miles. He was the son p.17 of Miles William and one of three children: 1st, Dafudd; 2nd, William, 3rd, Ann; and those are the children of Miles William, and he was the son of William Gibon. He had two children: 1st, Miles; 2nd, Thomas. I do not know if there were more or not – i.e., of William Gibon. He was the son of Gibon Howel; Gibon Howel was the son of Howel Thomas, p.18 and he (i.e., Howel Thomas) is the furthest generation of which I obtained a history. Gibon Howel, the 2nd generation; William Gibon, the 3rd; Miles William, the 4th; Dafudd Miles, the 5th; Thomas Dafudd Miles, the 6th; Richard Thomas, the 7th; and my mother, the 8th. And I myself the 9th. And William , my son, the 10th. That is the pedigree of my mother’s father (i.e., Richard Thomas). Next I shall give the account p.19 of the people of my grandmother, my mother’s mother. She (my grandmother) is the daughter of David Edwart. He had 6 children. Their names are as follows: 1st, Niccollas; 2nd, Richard; 3rd, Edwart; 4th, Cathrin; 5th, Mary; 6th, Gwenllian (i.e., my grandmother). Those are the names of the children of David Edwart. David Edwart was the son of Edwart Jones, and he married two p.20 wives, and he had 6 children by each one. First I shall name the children of the first wife: 1st, Niccollas; 2nd, Richard; 3rd, Dafudd (i.e., my grandfather); 4th, William; 5th, John; 6th, Danial. Those are the children of the first wife. Next I shall name the children of the second wife: 1st, Niccolas; 2nd, Morgan; 3rd, Thomas; 4th, Edwart; 5th, Margret; 6th, John. Those are the names of the children of Edwart Jones. Edwart Jones was the son of John Richard. I do not have any more history of the people of my grandmother. p.21 That is as much of the history of my people which I have at present. My father was buried when I was 14 years old. He strived hard to live and to raise his children. He was never affiliated with any one religion, but when he would go to a meeting of the Baptists he used to listen and read a lot in the Bible. He did not have the privilege of hearing the gospel; p.22 it had not come to this country when he died. He was a very loved man in his neighborhood. And I believe that he would have believed the gospel had he heard it; and I believe that he will yet believe it. My mother’s mother is still alive (i.e., the year of 1852), and she lives in Dinas, and she has been one of the Baptists for 40 years or more. And she is not willing to receive the gospel. p.23 But she does not persecute the servants of God at all as far as I have heard. There is not one of my family except for William, my oldest brother, and myself who have obeyed the gospel as far as I know at present. We have testified to the greater part of them, that is, to those of them who are the closest, and I intend to get to see many of them before going to Zion (next spring). p.24 Next I shall give a little of my history before coming to the Church. I left home when I was 17 years old (i.e., that of my mother), because I was pulled out from the works of Dinas and then worked here and there through Glamorganshire and Monmouthshire. I was very angry (?) for about 3 years’ time. But I got fed up with that when I was about 20 years old. And in Llanvabon I first heard the gospel as I recall, p.25 but I did not pay much attention to it at that time. But in some time after that I went to the Saints room in Llanfabon to listen to the Saints preach, and there I was pricked. I do not know the man’s name who was presiding over the branch of Hirwan at that time, and he was a tall man, and I heard that he left before I came to the Church. That is a short abridgement of my history before I came to the Church, i.e., the Church of Jesus Christ. p.26 I did not come back to the Church for years after that, I know not how long. I came to Llanilltid Fardre the Wednesday after Whitsun the year of 1847, and there I saw Rebecca, my wife. I married her in July of 1849 in the Church of Llanilltid Fardra. The name of the priest was James Thomas. She [my wife] is the daughter of Lewis Morgans from Llast, the parish of Llanilltid Fardre, and Margret, the daughter of Philip Philips, a native of Breconshire, and she was born (i.e., my mother-in-law)…[An incomplete sentence] I do not have any of the history of my wife’s people at present. If I can get the history of some of them I shall write it all later. Now I shall give an account of my coming into the Church, i.e., The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I was baptized p.27 23 January 1851 by Thomas Jones, a priest of the Llantrisant Branch. I was confirmed an official member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on the 26th of January under the hands of Thomas Morgan, the Branch President of Llantrisant. I was called to be a priest and ordained on April 11th by William Jones, a traveling elder. After that I was called to be an elder. I was ordained 21 May 1851 by William Jones, a traveling elder. p.28 I did not keep a detailed account of my activities in the year of 1851, but I shall record that which I can get a hold of in the journal. I sold two shillings worth of various pamphlets to a man by the name of Evan William, a good and very wealthy man, an he received the “Udgorn” [the Welsh Mormon periodical] from me every fortnight and the Book of Mormon and other pamphlets from time to time. p.29 And he paid for all of them. I sold a great number of books to the inhabitants of the place. I received ten copies of the Book of Mormon myself and I have a accounting for all the money which I paid for the books and other things nearby. In Llantrisant I preached for the first time ever. I preached a lot in Llanilltid and went from house to house testifying and selling books. p.30 And it was in my house that the brethren slept when they came by. And I clothed them and gave to many of them money to satisfy their needs. And they were respected by Rebecca, my wife, and they testify to that about her. Now I began to write the account of my labor in May of 1852. In that month there was and accident in Aberdar. p.31 The damp [noxious gas] caught fire in Mr. T. Powell’s mine where 67 men were killed, and 14 of them were Saints; and two of my sisters margret’s children were there. Their names were William and John. William was the oldest. His age was 16 in November 1852. John’s age was 11 in April 1852. They were very pure, wise and thoughtful children, and we loved them dearly. p.32 On the 19th of this month I fasted on behalf of some persons that they would have strength to obey the gospel. Their names are as follows: John Arthur, William Thomas, singer, John William, miller. 23rd – I was at the house of my grandmother getting the history of my pedigree from her and testified to them about the gospel. 24th – I was at the Council in Pontytupridd where I used to p.33 go regularly on the 31st of the month on the last day. That time Evan Williams, President, and Rees Jenkins, Teacher, and myself were fasting on behalf of the honest people n the area. From 9:00 a.m. until the nest morning we did not eat or drink any kind of drink. I have nothing else to relate this month. June 1852, 6th day – in a meeting of the Saints in m house. p.34 7th day – in a council in Pontytypridd. 8th – in a prayer meeting in my own house. 10th – in a meeting of the Saints in my own house. I taught there. 12th – I said my morning prayers at 8:00 and at 11:00 was in a preaching meeting by the Church (i.e., the Church of Llanilltid). At 2.)) – in a meeting of the Saints in my house and in my house we held meetings of the Saints. p.35 15th – in a prayer meeting in the house of Evan Williams, Llynnos, and I was in Dinas inquiring the names of those who intend to go to Zion, and I gather a lot of money. I slept there that night . 18th – I was around the place throughout the day and at the mine also. I went home that night and to the meeting of the Saints. 19th – I went up to Llanvabon to collect money p.36 from among the world. I got a lot through trying here and there. 20th day – I said my prayers in Llanvabon at 8:00 a.m. At 11:00 – at Pontytypridd. At 2:00 – in Pontytypridd. At 5:00 – in Llanilltid in a preaching meeting. 21st – in council in Pontytypridd. 22nd – I was around inquiring about the Book of Mormon to find them and to sell books. 24th – in a prayer meeting in my own house. p.37 I collected money. 26th – Traveled around. 27th – I said my prayers at 8:30 a.m. At 11:00 by the Church in a preaching meeting. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints. I taught the Saints to keep themselves clean always. So this month ended. July 1852. The 1st – I fasted from food and drink from 10:00 a.m. until the next morning p.38 on behalf of the men who were honest in heart. 4th – I said my prayers at 8:30 a.m. At 11:00 I preached by Olibuch. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints. I taught the brothers and sisters to strive to keep the teachings of the servants of God. At 5:00 I preached by Efilisia [Efail-isaf]. 4th – I was at the council in Pontytypridd. 6th – I tried to collect money to go to Zion. 7th – In Llantrisant _________. p.39 8th – in a prayer meeting in my own house. 9th – My wife and I fasted on behalf of the little boy for him to have health, and he received a blessing. 1st – in a conference in Merthyr Tydfil. 13th – I was on the hill praying. 15th – I baptized a boy 25 years old. 18th – in a meeting of the Saints in my house. p.40 I taught there briefly. 22nd – in a prayer meeting in my house. 25th – I said my prayers in the morning. At 11:00 – in a preaching meeting by Thriorshw {place name}. I preached there myself. 28th – I took books around and books to the subscribers and sold books also. 30th – I spend a day working in Penris [Pen-rhys]. I received 1 shilling 6 pence for my work. That is the end of this month, i.e., the month of July 1852. p.41 August 1852. I said my prayers in the morning. At 11:00 I was released to go with my brother , Dafu, Because he had come to see me from Penrus Ystrad Tafodog [Pen-rhys Ystradygodwg] to Llanilltyd. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints. The president called on me to teach at the end of the meeting. I encouraged the Saints to be brave and to recognize their places and to be diligent in the work of God. p.42 At 6:00 p.m. I preached at Pontytypridd. 3rd – a man by the name of John Williams was in the Cross Inn lecturing about the geography of California. He was a minister with the Independents, and he praised the Saints and their establishment. 6th – in Llantrisiant requesting money. 7th – at home writing. 8th – I said my morning prayers. p.43 At 11:00 – at Olibuch preaching. At 2:00 in a meeting of the saints I taught the Saints to recognize the government of God. At 5:00 – at Efilisia [Efail-isaf] in a preaching meeting. 9th – I started on my way. 15th – I arose this morning in Abardar and went to a meeting of the Saints at 11:00 a.m. 16gh – in the council at Pontytpridd. 19th – in a prayer meeting in my house. 22nd – I was in the place p.44 which is called Grosfan [Groesfaen] preaching in the morning at 11:00. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints in Llanilltyd in my own house. The president called me to teach. I exhorted them to strive to prepare them to come to Zion. At 5:00 p.m. – in a preaching meeting by Olibuch. 23rd – in a prayer meeting in my house. 26th – in a meeting of the Saints in my house. I taught about the perpetual emigrating fund. 29th – I said my prayers in the morning. In a meeting of the Saints at 2:00. I went to Pontytypridd in the evening to fetch my wife home p.45 after sending Dafudd, my brother, home from Llanilltyd. He had been in our house. That’s the end of this month, i.e., August. Next, September 1852. 2nd – a meeting of the Saints was held in my home, R.J. Daves. I began the meeting with prayer. Evan Williams and I ordained Rees Jenkens a priest and William Owen a teacher. I was voice in ordaining William Owen. I taught them their duties. p.46 5th – I said my morning prayers. At 11:00 by Olibuch preaching. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints in Bro. William Owen’s house. I taught the brethren to be more enthusiastic with the work of God and to strive to pay for books and so on in the future. 9th – I began with prayer. The president called on me to teach. I taught them what was the government of God. I exhorted them to strive to recognize the government of God. 12th- the Sabbath. I said my prayers at 8:00 a.m. p.47 2nd of October 1852. I was collecting names in Bwll-y-waunwullt. I went to the town of Llanilltyd to sleep that night. 3rd – I took my wife to Merthyr to the Conference. We slept at the Star that night. My wife was not feeling well because she had miscarried lately. But her faith was strong in the servants of God and she was desirous of being taught by them. And she received a good word from them, and they all love her because it was in our house they used to sleep when thy came to Llanilltyd. And now I, Richard J. Davies, give a good word for Rebecca my wife, for she has been obedient to me continually and has been a good Saint, keeping the work of wisdom, has forsaken tea and has done as we have told her continually, and has been willing to assist the servants of God continually with that which she can in clothes and making them comfortable and well. 4th – I was at the council in the Waytyn Room, Merthyr. I took my wife home that night to Llanilltyd. p.48 5th – I went up to Aberdar to get names. I was in the Plow Room in the Council that night. I slept at my sister’s house that night. 6th – searched for names. I slept at my sister’s house that night. 7th – I went to the Abernant works. I slept at my sister’s house that night. 8th – I tried to go to the Aberaman pits but failed. 9th – I collected money around. 10th – the Sabbath. At 11:00 a.m. – in the Plow Room in a preaching meeting. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints in the Well Charp Room in the village of Aberdar. Pres. D Roberts called on me to teach. I taught them to love the servants of God who continued to preside over them. 6th – in the afternoon in a preaching meeting in the Plow Room. 11th – I went to request work up at the Plow pits form David Jones, foreman. I was unable to get any. 12th – I went to request work from Richard Williams. I was successful. 13th – I worked. 14th – I worked during the day and at 7:00 in the evening I was with my wife in a meeting of the Saints in the Plow Room. 15th – I worked. 16th – I worked. p.49 17th – I woke up in Treaman and went on the train to Trefforast and to Llanilltyd home. At 11:00 a.m. in the school. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints. The president called on me to teach. I exhorted them to love one another and to defend each other and to sustain one another. I ended with prayer. I collected the branch accounts. 18th – I went to Merthyr to pay 3 pounds of prepayment in order to go to Zion in the emigration in January 1853. From there I went to Aberdar to my job across the mountain. 17th – I worked. I was in the meeting in the Plow Room in the evening at 7:00. 20th – at work. 21st – at work. I was in the meeting of the Saints at 7:00 in the evening in the Plow Room. 22nd – at work. 23rd – I was around collecting money. 24th – the Sabbath. I said my morning prayers. I went to get some medicine form a doctor of the Saints who used herbs, and went to him to tell him the circumstances of my wife, and he gave me a small bottle to use in tea leaves, and he charged 3 shillings for it. It helped her greatly. In a preaching meeting at 11:00 a.m. in the Plow Room. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints in the Cwmbach Branch. p.50 Pres. Jn Lewelin called on me to teach. I spoke briefly a little before Thomas Pugh, the Conference President. At 6:00 – in the afternoon I preached in the Plow Room. 25th – worked. 26th – worked. I was at the council in the Plow Room at 7:00 in the evening. 27th – worked. 28th – worked. I was at the meeting of the Saints at 7:00 in the evening in the Plow room. 29th – worked. 30th – worked. 31st – Sabbath. I said my morning prayers at 8:00. At the meeting of the Saints at 2:00. At 6:00 p.m. – in a preaching meeting in the Plow Room. That is the end of the Month of October. November1852 The first day – at work breaking coal. 2nd – at work. 3rd – at work. 4th – at work and in a meeting of the Saints at 7:00p.m. 5th – at work. 6th – at work 7th – Sabbath and I said my morning prayers. At 11:00 I went to the Aberaman Branch meeting. We were there until 3:00 in the afternoon fasting our lunch. At 6:00 p.m. – in a preaching meeting at the same branch. 8th – worked. 9th – worked. p.51 10th - worked. 11th – worked. 12th – worked. 13th – worked in the morning. I went on the train to Pontytpridd to the house of Mr. Goodman, the watchmaker to fetch my watch. I went to Llanilltyd from there to the house of Bro. William Owen and them to where I made my home. After I sold him my furniture I collected the branch reports until 9:00 o’clock. 14th – I said my prayers at 8:30 a.m. William Owen and I went to a farmhouse by the name of “Ty y Person a Llygra.” We testified there about Joseph Smith and taught them the principles. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints at the home of Brother Owen. President Williams called on me to teach. I taught the government of God. Then in the evening I took books to the distributors. 15th – I arose at Llanilltyd and went on the train to Aberdar. I worked through the day. 16th – worked. 17th – worked. 18th – worked. I was at a meeting of the Saints in the evening at 7:00. 19th – composed a hymn at the home of Dewi Elfad Jones. 20th – worked. I went to Llanilltyd on the train at 6:00 in the evening. 21st – Sabbath. I said my morning prayers. After that I went to inform p.52. the people that Dewi Elfad Jones and John Edmwns, the branch president of Aberaman, would be preaching at the home of William Owen at 11:00 a.m. And at 2:00 I was in the meetings throughout the day. 22nd – I went up to Aberdar on the train. 23rd – I went to Merthur across the mountain of Aberdar and to the home of President Phillips to get my instructions from him with respect to the emigration to Zion because I am short of the amount to go with the men who can pay 10 pounds. I needed 30 pounds to take my wife and son, William , who was two years old the 29th of November of 1852, and he counseled me to go to my family and try to obtain the money. And I went and collected about 3 pounds and 10 shillings through my efforts. I walked Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and Saturday for the money, and Evan Williams, the Llanilltyd Branch President, was with me on Saturday, and it was 11:00 o’clock before we got home. 28th – the Sabbath. I was in Pontytpridd preaching. 29th – I went from Llanilltyd to Aberdar on the train. 30th – worked. And so this month came to an end, i.e., November 1852. Next, December 1852. One the first day I worked. 2nd – worked. p.53 The third day – worked and in a meeting of the Saints at 7:00 in the evening in the Aberaman Branch. I began the meeting with prayer. I taught the Saints to take care to keep the spirit of God with them and so on and so forth. 4th – worked. I went to Llanilltyd to sleep that night. 5th – Sabbath day. I said my morning prayers. At the meeting of the Saints at 2:00. I taught about the persecutions and so on and so forth. I ended the meeting with prayer. 6th – I went from Llanilltyd to Merthyr to the home of President Phillips to pay 15 pounds of money for the emigration, i.e., 5 pounds each for myself and my wife and the boy, which was to be sent ahead of time for each traveler for the purpose of buying the necessary things for the journey. 7th – I went to the job and in the evening I was at the council. That night I strained my leg and knee. I was unable to work on the 8th. On the 9th I fasted my lunch to get better. I was unable to work on the 10th and 11th. 12th – Sabbath day. I said my morning prayers. I read at home all day. 13th – I was unable to work. p.54 On the 14th and the 15th and the 16th and the 17th and the 18th I was unable to work because of have strained my leg. It happened that a boy who was boarding at my sister’s house where I was staying at that time had a nosebleed and it was bleeding for about four hours. And they wanted to call a doctor for him because it was running fast and weakening him greatly. And he was a brave lad ready to do good to any man. And as it continued to bleed I went into my room to pray for God to spare his life. And I went to him in full faith and laid my hand on him praying for the Lord to stop his blood from flowing. And immediately it stopped, and I thanked God for his goodness. This happened on the 17th of this month, i.e., December 1852. 19th – Sabbath day. I said my morning prayers. I went to the meeting at 11:00 a.m. to the Plow branch and at 6:00 in the evening I was called on to sing form the new hymn book, i.e., “Cenedloedd y byd sy’n gwawdio’n drahaus” [The nations of the world who scorn haughtily -- #458 in the 1852 Welsh Mormon hymnal], and so on and so forth. p.55 20th, Monday – I went to Doctor Williams Philips who lived in Monmouthshire at a place called Pentwum Mawr which was very strange_____________, and I believed that my leg was out of place and it turned out to be so, and he set it in its place. It cost 8 shillings. I had 9 miles to walk from there to the train. I walked them with my leg held in place by a big brace. I went to my sister Mary’s house in Abergwuddon two miles further. I slept there that night and I was very tired. I stayed there until Friday. On the 24th I started home to Aberdar that night to sleep at home of Margret, my sister, and her husband. And I was very tire because of my let. 25th – Christmas. I was at home the greater part of the day. I was at the meeting of the Saints in the Plow Room in the evening at 6:00. We had and enjoyable time there. There was a little dancing and stepping there and singing and talking. We were edified greatly. p.56 26th- Sabbath day. Elder Pugh and Elder Evan Williams and Freewas with me. We went to the meeting at 11:00 a.m. at Plow Branch and at 2:00 and at 6:00 in the evening. 27th – I was at a concert at the Aberaman Branch. 28th – I began to work and that was the first day since the 7th of this month because of the injury to my leg. In the afternoon I went to Merthyr to the Council to listen to the brethren from the Valley, i.e., Captain Jones and his two companions. 29th – worked. I got very tired working because of walking to Merthyr while I was lame. And it was one o’clock by the time I came home from Merthyr. 39th – worked in the morning. A messenger came to fetch me out because of Brother Pugh. 31st – I went to work, and as I was working I put my leg out of place again. I went out immediately and sent for the doctor immediately to try to get my leg in place. He failed to do me any good, and it caused me pain as he tried to set it in its place. p.57 I borrowed six shillings from my sister, Margaret, and went on the train to Cardiff and from there to Casnewudd and from Casnewudd to Bonewudd on the train. I walked from there a mile and a half to the doctor and I had heard about him before, i.e., the son of Mary from Benar, and by the time I got there he was not at home, I walked back to Bonewudd. I went on the train from there to Abergwuddon to the home of my sister, Mary, and there I slept that night and was very tired. January 1, 1853. I stayed at the home of my sister that day. The 2nd day – the Sabbath. I went on the train to Bonewudd and from there to the home of the doctor again and he tried to get my leg back in place. He failed to do me any good. I went from there to the home of a brother by the name of Thomas. I got food there from his wife. I started form there to Llanfabon. I slept at the home of Alban Jenkens. I arose on the 3rd and went on the train to Troed-y-riw. I walked to Merthyr from there because my money was gone. I was at the council in the Wyit Room. I went from there to the home of Bro. p.58 Philips to ask him if he would anoint my leg. He did so immediately, and I received the blessing and my leg went back into place. I slept at the Weit that night. I got up and went to Aberdar across the mountain with two other brothers. I went on the train to Trefforast and from there to Llanilltud. I slept at the home of William Owen. 5th – I requested work from Evan Williams because that was the job that I had when I hurt my leg. 6th – I collected money for books. I slept at the home of Wm Owen. 7th – I went on the train to Mount Anach’s. I collected and settled things. I came on the 8th day on the trains to Pontytypridd and fro there to Llanilltud to the home of Wm Owen and slept there that night. There also my wife used to stay frequently after we sold to them our household items, and they always received us graciously. 9th – Sabbath day. I went to Pontytypridd this morning to p.59 meet with my family at the house of William, my brother. They had promised to meet me there before we left for Zion. None of them came except for Margret, my sister. I met two at the Pont Branch. I taught there about the growth of the Church and the new revelations which were being proclaimed through the Udgorn [Welsh Mormon periodical]. I preached there at 6:00 p.m., and I took my wife to Llanilltud to sleep at the house of William Owen. 10th – I prepared to work at the mine of Evan Williams. 11th - I began to work for Evan Williams. 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th – worked. I presided over a meeting of the Saints the 13th at the house of William Owen at 7:00 p.m. 16th – Sabbath day. I said my prayers in the morning. I went to the farmhouse called Tu Person to offer books to them. At 2:00 at the meeting of the Saints. I taught there that they should always be ready to free themselves from the bonds of tradition. I ended the meeting with prayer. 17th – worked. 18th – worked. 19th – at home. 20th – worked. That is the last day p.60 I worked. That night I was informed that I was to be in Liverpool the last day of this month. 21st – I went to see my relatives. I walked 30 miles. My feet were frightfully sore, and I was not in a bed that night in order to make preparations for the journey. 23rd – I went to Merthyr to counsel with President W. S. Philips. I came back to Llanilltyd to sleep at the house of William Owen. 24th – I was in Merthyr again. I walked from Llanilltyd to counsel as I was advised the previous day. 25th – we started on the way to Zion. I took my wife and son to Swansea. 26th – at 5:00 a.m. I went to the packet. At 4:30 on the 28th we reached Liverpool. We lodged at the house of Mr. D. James. February 5th, 1853. We went on board the ship “Jersey” to travel to New Orleans. The journey took us six weeks ____________. We went from the ship to a packet by the name of “Simons” in New Orleans, and we went on that to Saint Louis along the Mississippi River. p.61 We went on another packet 250 miles along the Mississippi River to a town by the name of Keock in the State of Iowa, North America. We stayed there for nine weeks. We started from there to a place by the name of Montrose, 12 miles further up the river. I was at that time able to swim. We were there for a month and from there we began the journey in wagons over to Kensail Blyffs [Council bluffs]. We camped there for a week along the Missouri River. We crossed the river in rafts and to the country of the Indians. We traveled this country across rock, rivers and mountains. On the 10th day of October we arrived at Great Salt Lake City. We stayed 4 days in the City. I got a place for me and my wife 10 miles to the North. I worked in this place for about two months until the snow came to keep me from working. My wife and I received our patriarchal blessings under the hand of old p.62 father John Smith, the head Patriarch of the Church at that time. December 10th. 1854. A daughter was born to me and Rebecca, my wife. We called her Margret Elen. We lived at that time in a valley of the Mountains in a place called Welo Crik [Willow Creek]. July 30, 1856. A child was born to me by Rebecca, my wife. Her name was called Rebecca Jen; we had received our endowments in June 1856, i.e., the previous month. January 24, 1858. A daughter was born to me and my wife, Rebecca. We called her Ann Gwenllian. October 7, 1859. A son was born to me and Rebecca, my wife. We named him Richard Elies. I baptized my son William, on May 22. He was confirmed under the hands of Brother Cordon. [Note: pages 63 and 64 are in English and need no translation] They appear to be simple sentences for the purpose of practicing English grammar. [Translated from the original Welsh journal of Richard J. Davis by Ronald D. Dennis, 1529 W. 1170 North, Provo, Utah 84604, in 1982.]

Richard Jenkins Davis

Colaborador: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Richard Jenkins Davis was the son of William Davis Jenkins and Gwenllian Thomas. He was born at Ystred Parish Glarmorganshire, South Wales on 3rd September 1826. His Father died when he was very young boy and he lived with his grandfather, Richard Thomas doing farm work. Later he worked in the coal mines. While working in the mines at Llant Parish he met and married Rebecca Morgan in July 1849. On the 23rd of January 1851 he was baptized and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was ordained a Priest on the 11th of Aril 1851 by William Jones. He was ordained an Elder the 21st of May 1851 and was appointed a counselor to the President of the Llanstwit Branch of the Myrther Conference where he labored until the 25th of January 1853, when he bid goodbye to his friends and relatives and Native Land and started for America with his wife and two year old son. They left Liverpool on the ship “Jersey” on February 5th 1853. After six weeks on the ship they landed at New Orleans and took steamer up the Mississippi River and landed at Kerkerk, Iowa. They stayed there nine weeks preparing to cross the plains. After a hard trip and much suffering, common to those days, they landed in Salt Lake City on the 10th of September 1853. The spent the winter with old Father Call at Bountiful and in the spring of 1854 they moved to Willard. He entered into the activities of this community, building one of the first substantial houses. In connection with Will Walker they opened the first road in the willow Creek Canyon. On February 3, 1959, he was set apart as one of the seven Presidents of the Seventy in the 59th Quorum which was organized the same day. On April 6th, 1865 he was called to fill a mission to Wales. He left Willard on May 10, 1865, and arrived in Omaha on July 1st. He went down the Missouri on a Steamer to St. Joseph from where he took the train to New York City. On July 16th, he sailed from New York for Liverpool and arrived there July 26th. He was set apart to labor in South Wales. After an absence of twelve years he met his brothers and sisters and other relatives who treated him kindly but had o interest in his religion. From August 1865 to February 1866 he labored in Monmouth and Glamorganshire and from February 1866 to May 1868 he labored in the Carmarthin Conference, covering Carmarthin, Pembrook and Cardiganshires, his headquarters being at Llanelley. On May 29th, 1868 he was released to return home, sailing from Liverpool June 4th, 1868 on the steamship “John Bright” with a company of 700 Saints. They landed in New York June 14th and traveled by rail to Laramie, Wyo. They moved on to Salt Lake in Captain Chester Loverlands mule team train arriving August 25th, 1868. He arrived at his home in Willard August 28th, 1868 after an absence of three years and three months finding his family of 2 wives and nine children in good health but destitute. In the Spring of 1868 three of the best cows had died from easting wild parsnips, later on the only team he had died from eating joint rushes, thus handicapped but with the usual energy he started to provide for his family. In November 1868 he went to Malad Valley, entered 160 acres of land, built a log house and returned to Willard for the winter. In the spring of 1869 he in the company of Moses Dudley and John D. Jones, each taking part of their families and their cattle, sheep, pigs and chickens, they started out to build new homes in the Malad Valley. With him was his wife, Elizabeth, sons William M., Richard E., and daughter Margaret. The writer of this sketch has a very clear memory of that April morning when we landed on a desolate sage brush flat to live in a log room with neither a roof nor a floor and very little to interest us but rattle snakes, coyotes, and wolves. He went to work building corrals, sheds and fencing hay land. With all his home cares he always found time for religious and civic affairs. He in company with four others he built a good log school house and started the first school in that part of the Valley. He organized a branch of the Church there, covering Willow Springs, Cherry Creek and Henderson Creek over which he presided for several years. During these years he was still on the seven Presidents of the 59th Quorum. He was the senior President of the Quorum at the time of his death. He was married to Rebecca Morgan, Phoebe Davis, Elizabeth, and Martha. He was the father of 29 children, twenty of who grew to manhood and womanhood. Richard Jenkins Davis died at Willow Springs, Oneida County, Idaho on October 5th and was buried at Willard, Box Elder County, Utah. Sketch composes by son Richard E. Davis

Rebecca Jane Morgan

Colaborador: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

REBECCA JANE MORGAN 30 January 1828 - 5 April 1896 Rebecca Morgan was born 30 January 1828 at Llantwit Vardra Glamorganshire, South Wales. Her father, Lewis Morgan was born in 1795, and died 9 January 1880 at Llantwit Vardra. Her mother, Margaret Phillips, was born 1801 in Breckon Shir, and died 24 January 24, 1867, at Llantwit. Both were buried in the Llantwit Church-yard. Rebecca Morgan was married to Richard Jenkin Davis of the Rhonda Valley at Llantwit Vardra Church sometime in the fall of 1849 or winter of 1850. They were baptized and became members of the L.D.S. church in 1850. On the 5th of February, 1853 they sailed from Liverpool on the ship "Jersey" for New Orleans, where they landed after being on water six weeks to the day. They went from New Orleans to St. Louis on the "Stranon". From St. Louis they went to Keokruk were they stayed 9 weeks and then went to Council Bluffs. From there they started across the plains by Ox teams for Salt Lake where they arrived 10 October 1853. They stayed 4 days in Salt Lake and then went to Shesshions settlement, now Bountiful, and lived with Cyril Call. In the spring of 1854 they moved to Willow Creek (Willard) where Rebecca lived the rest of her life. In April, 1865 her husband was called to go to Wales to do Missionary work. Along in the early 1860's Richard Davis married a plural Wife named Phoebe. When he left for his mission, Rebecca had 8 children and Phoebe had 2. The two women and their families lived happily together. Rebecca was very handy with her needle, nursing and midwifery. This way Rebecca went out while Phoebe cared for the house and children. Rebecca was also gifted in handling their farm. She followed the midwifery until the year 1882, having never lost a mother in all her cases. With all her home cares she always found time for social and religious activities, and took an active part in musical work, dancing and singing in the early settlement. She was a member of the first Willard Choir, led by John P. Wood. She was also a member of the first Relief Society, and with Auntie Parish and James P. Owens attended to the gathering of wheat for the Relief Society. Mrs. Owens's son, William and Mrs. Davis's son, Richard made many trips driving a team with their mothers to gather this wheat, which was made into flour and sent to relieve the suffering during the World War I. Rebecca had 8 children, her first child, William, was born in Wales. He was among the first babies landing in Willard. Rebecca's last two years were full of much suffering, but she always clung to the great work of the lord. She died 5 April 1896.

Richard Jenkins Davis - a Biography

Colaborador: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Richard Jenkins Davis Richard Jenkins Davis was born in South Wales, the son of William Jenkins Davis and Gwenllis (sometimes spelled Gwenllia) Thomas on the third of September 1826. He was actually born on a farm named "Gynllwun do" in the Ystrad Pafadog Parish in Glamorganshire. Richard was the fifth child born into the family. He had three older sisters named Margaret, Mary and Jane and an older brother named William. Obviously his brother was named after their father and Richard was named after his mother's father Richard Thomas. After Richard came Gwinllian, David, Ann and Thomas. Richard's family had lived in the Rhondda Valley, Pontygwaith and Pontypride, South Wales for many generations The family lived in coal mining country and their father died when Richard was a teenager, so he went to live with his mother's parents who were quite elderly at the time. He helped his Grandfather Richard Thomas doing farm work. He said in his own words, "I left home (that is the home of my mother) when I was seventeen years old because I was pulled out from the works of Dinas and then I worked here and there through Glamorganshire and Monmouthshire. I was very angry for about three years time. But I got fed up with that when I was about twenty years old." Richard worked in the coalmines, as did almost everyone else of the region at that time. In 1847 at Llanilltid Fardah he met his future wife. When he was twenty-three in July of 1849 he married Rebecca Morgan in that same place. On November 29, 1850 Rebecca gave birth to their first son whom they named William after Richard's father. Before his marriage and in Llanvabon, Richard first heard the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day saints preaching, but he did not pay any attention to what he heard. Later on he went to hear them preach and says he was "pricked". However Richard did not return to the meetings until a year or more later and was baptized on the twenty-third of January 1851 by Thomas Jones and confirmed by Thomas Morgan, the branch president in Llantrisant, in the city of Llanylltydfardre, Glamorganshire. By the middle of 1852, Richard and Rebecca and his brother William had all been baptized and confirmed members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. He was ordained a Priest, and then an Elder, on April 11th and May 21st 1851 respectively and was appointed counselor to the President of the Branch where he labored until January 25th 1853. Richard spent much of his time preaching to the people of the area and going from house to house testifying and selling books about the gospel. Whenever missionaries or other members of the church came to the area, it was Richard who gave them a place to stay. His journal records, "It was in my house that the brethren slept when they came by and I clothed them and gave to many of them money to satisfy their needs. And they were respected by Rebecca, my wife, and they testified to that about her." In 1852 there was a terrible mining accident in nearby Aberdare. The damp noxious gases caught fire in Mr. T. Powell's mine and 67 men were killed. Fourteen of them were members of the church and two of Richard's nephews aged 16 and 11 were also killed. Richard truly desired to share his newfound religion with everyone and often fasted in behalf of others. Prayer and other church meetings were often held in his house. He also spent considerable time collecting money to pay for travel expenses for his planned trip to America. In order to support his family he worked in the mines and a day's wage was about one shilling and sixpence (fifteen cents). In the fall of 1852, Rebecca suffered a miscarriage. There was not much time left before they were to leave Wales so Richard spent quite a bit of it visiting his relatives and gathering the names of his ancestors. Finally he had enough money to pay three pounds (six dollars) of prepayment in order to emigrate. But by the middle of November he was still short the total amount he needed to emigrate. For he and his wife and two year old son he needed thirty pounds. He went to his family for help and collected three pounds and ten shillings. In December of 1852, Richard must have had some sort of accident with his leg because he went by train to a doctor in Monmouthshire as he believed his leg was out of place. It cost him 8 shillings to have it set in place and then he walked nine miles to the station wearing a brace to keep it in place. Several weeks later, after he started working, he put the leg out again. A doctor tried to reset it. The procedure was very painful but did no good. Richard borrowed six shillings from his sister, Margaret, and went on the train to Cardiff and from there to Casnewudd and Bonewudd to find a doctor he had heard of. He walked a mile and a half from the train station and the doctor was not home. Richard walked back to Bonewudd and caught a train to his sister Mary's house in Abergwuddon. Two days later he returned to the doctor's but the doctor was unable to do any good. On the long trip home Richard ran out of money and went to a Brother Philip's house to ask for a blessing. Immediately his leg went into place and he returned to work the next day. Rebecca and Richard sold all their household items and planned a meeting with all of his relatives to say good-bye. His journal records, "none of them came except for Margaret, my sister." When Richard found out that they were to leave at the end of the month he walked thirty miles to see his relatives. "My feet were frightfully sore, and I was not in bed that night in order to make preparations for the journey." On January 25th, Richard and his wife and son went to Swansea where they boarded a packet ship to Liverpool and on February 5th 1853 they set sail for New Orleans After six weeks on the ship, Jersey, they landed in New Orleans and took a steamer, the John Simons, up the Mississippi to Keokuk, Iowa. They stayed there 9 weeks preparing to cross the plains. According to the Mormon Overland Pioneer Index, Richard Jenkins Davis (or Davies) aged 27 was in the Joseph W. Young Company with his first wife and infant son, which left Keokuk, Iowa 1-7 June 1853 and arrived Salt Lake 10 October 1853. They also spent about a month in Montrose, twelve miles further up the river from Keokuk, before leaving for Council Bluffs, where they remained for a week "getting flour and other things for the plains." All that Richard records of the trip is the following: "We camped for a week along the Missouri River. We crossed the river in rafts and to the country of the Indians. We traveled this country across rocky rivers and mountains. After a tolerable hard journey our provisions gave out before we got in." After a hard trip and much suffering common to those days, they arrived in Salt Lake City on October 10th, 1853, eight and one half months after leaving Wales. They spent the winter with Father Call in Bountiful. "I found a place for myself and my wife Rebecca and William, my son, to stay with old father Call 10 miles north of Salt Lake City. Old Sister Call was ill. My wife and the boy had their living with the old folks for taking care of the old lady and house keeping. I went to work at this place called Schosion's Settlement. I kept at work as long as I could 'till the snow fell too deep for people to carry on business”, and in the spring they came to Willard. Before leaving, Richard and Rebecca received their Patriarchal blessings under the hand of "old father John Smith, the head patriarch at the time." He was the uncle of Joseph Smith. Once settled in Willow Creek, a daughter Margaret Ellen was born in 1854 followed by Rebecca Jean in 1856. A month before Rebecca was born Richard and Rebecca returned to Salt Lake City to receive their endowments and be sealed together. In 1858, Ann Gwenllian was born followed by a son in 1859 named Richard Elies. Richard and his family had to master the English language but Richard entered into the activities of the community and built one of the first substantial houses. It was a two-story house located in the central part of town, constructed of rock with a rock granary and completely surrounded by a rock wall made of rocks he took from the mountains of Willard. "I built a stone house with seven rooms. It is reputed to be one of the best homes in the state. I was persistent in gathering the materials together and through the blessings of God I finished the task." Richard was called to preside over the first quorum of elders at Willow Creek in 1854 and was set apart as one of the seven presidents of the Seventies of the 59th Quorum in 1859. Later that year his journal states: "I was called as a counsellor to the Bishop, Brother Alfrad Cordon on the 13th of September. I raised jealousy in the hearts of some of the brethren against me, and they brought accusations against me which were lies. Charles W. Hobart began; Evan E. Williams and Musaac. S. Williams helped him. C. Hobart broke out in the quorum of the high priests in my presence of being dishonest. E.E. Williams and M.S. Williams were his witnesses. These brethren were called to a meeting with the authorities at the home of Brother Harding to look into the matter. They were proved liars, and Brother C. W. Hobart was to ask forgiveness the following Sabbath in front of the meeting, which he did. I strived to help the bishop to overcome the evil influences in the ward, and to establish peace among the saints." In April 1863 Richard took a second wife in a polygamous marriage. Her name was Phoebe Davis the daughter of John Davis. On November 17th of that year Phoebe lost a baby girl whom they had named Mary Elizabeth. Then she gave birth to a healthy baby girl on March 18th 1864 named Emilia Ann. At the church's April General Conference in 1865 Richard was called to fill a mission to Wales. At the time Rebecca had eight children and Phoebe had two. The two women and their families lived very happily together. Rebecca was a seamstress and a midwife and was adept at taking care of the farm. She went out while Phoebe cared for the house and children. Richard supported his family farming. In connection with Will Walker he opened the first road in the Willard Creek canyon. The women were able to take care of themselves while he was gone. Richard left for Wales on May 23, 1865 in company with others. It was forty days before they reached Omaha City where he had his photograph taken to send to his family. In that city he sold the horse he had used to cross the plains and bought some things to send to his family. Then he says, "I purchased a through ticket to New York, and slept on board the steamer, Denver, on the Missouri River." After a few days in Wyoming he left St. Joseph by train for Chicago, where he arrived July 11th. On the way to New York he was able to spend a day at Niagara Falls. Richard engaged passage on the steamer Louisiana for Liverpool and arrived in Liverpool on July 28th. He had some clothes made and within a few days was in Wales. In Wales Richard saw for the first time in twelve years many of his relatives. They were happy to see him and very kind but were not interested in his religion. A Mr. Gibb, who settled in Portage, was converted and baptized by Richard J. Davis. They were always like brothers. While in Wales, Richard met Elizabeth Couzzens. She was a beautiful and well-educated seventeen-year-old convert to the church. He was forty years old. The two developed a friendship and when Richard returned to Utah, Elizabeth migrated herself. They came on the steamship John Bright, with 700 Saints. This time according to the Mormon Pioneer Index, they were in the Chester Loveland Company which left Laramie, Wyoming 25 July 1868 and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley 20 August 1868. Elizabeth went to stay with her sister who had previously migrated to Ogden and Richard arrived in Willard three years and three months to the day after leaving on the his mission. He found his family in good health but destitute. Phoebe had given birth to another child not long after he had left. In the spring, three of the best cows he had were poisoned on wild parsnip. Later on, the mule team he had died from eating something poisonous. Thus handicapped but with unusual energy, he started in to provide for his family. In September of 1868, Richard and Elizabeth were married in the endowment house. In November, 1868 after being in Willard 15 years, he went to Malad Valley, where he entered 160 acres of land, built a log house, and named the place "Willow Springs" for some deep sandy springs nearby. Richard then returned to Willard for the winter. On April 18, 1869 one of Phoebe's children, John Edmunds died and was buried in the Willard Cemetery. He was born prematurely and lived to be only hours old. That same spring of 1869, in the company of Aloses Dudley and John D. Jones, each taking part of their family, and their cattle, sheep, pigs and chickens, they started out to build new homes in the Malad Valley, about sixty miles away. With him was his wife, Elizabeth, sons, William M., Richard E. and daughter Margaret. His children remembered that April morning when they landed on a desolate sage brush flat to live in a log room with neither roof nor floor and very little to interest them but rattlesnakes, coyotes and wolves Willow Springs was a lonely spot with the nearest neighbor almost a mile away. Richard went to work hauling lumber from the mountains and building corals, shed, and fencing hay land. He also completed a house with two large log rooms, a bedroom, a kitchen and living room all in one. There was a large fireplace and a stove in the kitchen. The home was very comfortable. The rooms were whitewashed and a cellar and a cool cellar built of rock was attached to the house. This was the spot for keeping perishable foods. Elizabeth tried to adjust to her new home but wept many bitter tears. That summer she gave birth to her first son. She named him after her dear father in Wales. He was to be the first of thirteen children! Richard also maintained his farm at Willard where they raised sugar cane, wheat and corn. Between the two places there was never any want. With all his home cares Richard always found time for religion and civic affairs. He was a good violin player and played for dances. He in company with four others, one the schoolteacher, the Moon boys, and Tom and Dick Davis, his grandsons built a good log schoolhouse and started the first school in that part of the valley. Elizabeth was well educated and took on the responsibility of helping teach the children. They had previously held school in a lean-to near this. The school was between Cy Moon's and Margaret Davis'. Richard organized a branch of the church there, covering Willow Springs, Cherry Creek, and Henderson Creek over which he presided for several years. In 1870 Phoebe Davis gave birth to twin daughters in Willard, named Martha and Phoebe. The twins died and were temporarily buried in the garden until later when Richard and his son William dug them up to be buried in the new cemetery. This was the year that President Brigham Young and company visited Malad City, and Richard was asked to be the orator at the 4th of July celebration in Cherry Creek. After returning from a meeting with Lorenzo Snow in the fall of 1870, Richard set off to retrieve a horse stolen by the Indians from his wife Elizabeth's sister. He was always wise in dealing with the Indians and returned with the horse. He never seemed to have any trouble with the Indians. In 1871, the year Richard was heavily involved in building the schoolhouse, a son Hyrum was born to Phoebe and his son David, by Rebecca died. While Richard was in Willard, Elizabeth had a second son in 1872 who caught cold and died after three weeks on Elizabeth's birthday. Richard drove Elizabeth with the lifeless little baby on her lap, by wagon, in only one day to Willard to be buried. While on this trip Richard attended the "School of the Prophets" under the leadership of the apostle Lorenzo Snow. Lorenzo Snow gave Elizabeth much comfort. He was almost like a relative to Richard's family. In fact Richard spent a lot of time raising money for Lorenzo Snow's mission around the world. A month later Richard was back in Willard attending a May party with his wife Rebecca and some of his children. This party was attended by Brigham Young, George A. Smith and Daniel H. Wells. Although Willow Springs was quite remote it was a great social spot. The neighbors were music lovers and both Richard and Elizabeth loved to sing. Elizabeth's sisters visited her often. At special celebrations like the fourth of July, Richard was always chosen as the orator. Wherever he went he was called upon to speak. Richard and this family spent the winters in Willard where Elizabeth helped teach all of his children. Richard bought for Elizabeth a mahogany four-poster bed and a table. He also bought a beautiful large cradle when Elizabeth gave birth to her first daughter in 1873. That same year his wife Phoebe had a baby boy named Evan John. Also in 1873 Richard and some friends under the direction of the brethren, bought a gristmill at Malad City and organized a corporation sheep herd. He also personally acquired more beautiful purebred horses for the ranch. He also had more duties to perform such as serving on the Grand Jury and traveling to visit the seventies. Since the homestead law had been fulfilled at Willow Springs he decided to move back to Willard. He hired two responsible men to take care of things at Willow Springs. An addition had been added on to the home at Willard City and this is where he and Elizabeth went. In 1874 Elizabeth bore another son, Edward Harvey. About this time Phoebe had another son named Edward J. At this time was the building of the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific Railroad. The Irish men who were building toward the setting sun were hard fighters, hard drinkers and hard workers. They fought off the Indians, the buffalo and any obstacle that came in their way. When they met the hard working coolies from the west they treated them with disdain and sometimes fought to the death! In May of 1875 Richard received the news that his and Phoebe's son Evan John had drowned. He was only two years old. In the summer of 1876, Richard and Elizabeth returned to Willow Springs because it was not being taken care of, as it should. That summer Elizabeth had another daughter, Mary Ann, and they returned once again to Willard for the winter. Because of dirty water and decaying fruit there were epidemics of diseases like diphtheria. Elizabeth walked a mile for clean well water and she was meticulously clean with the food so her family was spared. The citizens of Willard united to furnish fresh meat by slaughtering often and dividing into portions. After a slaughter, the Indians came to get the leftovers, which to them was a great treat. The people of the town, as with those of other Mormon towns were good and moral. They did not drink, cheat or steal and adultery was almost unknown. Doors could be left unlocked and adults could walk the streets at any time without being assaulted. The ceremony of marriage was serious and signified a real contract and divorce was very uncommon. For amusement dance parties were held interspersed with refreshments and recitations. Many of the people of Willard and Malad were Welsh. Of course there were some rough but not dangerous characters who sometimes disturbed the peace. This element was becoming quite unruly about this time. Richard was a brave man and a peacemaker, but if need be, a fighter. He was requested to take care of the disturbers of the peace and he succeeded. Community parties were held upstairs and as the bullies came up the stairs Richard knocked them down one by one. From then on all was in order in the hall. Another son for Elizabeth came along in 1878 and was named John Charles, followed by Joseph in the fall of 1880. This was after the death of Rachel Elizabeth, Phoebe's daughter who was almost fifteen. In 1882, Richard and Elizabeth decided that she would move back to Willow Springs since she was very ambitious and desired to increase their land and cattle business. During that summer a new house was built. It was built of logs, then chinked and plastered between the logs. The inside was plastered smooth and papered and the outside was weather boarded and painted white. The roof was covered with red cedar shingles and painted sky blue. The house had six rooms, including a large dining room with a three-foot wainscot and a huge boys bedroom. The house was carpeted with some Danish rag carpets, which were drawn taut and tacked down. Under the carpets was laid a filling of straw or corn leaves. When the straw became old it was replaced and the carpets cleaned. Richard was able to purchase nice beds and dressers for the bedrooms. The sitting room had a deep rose velvet couch and other beautiful furniture. Richard even went to Ogden to purchase a piano for Elizabeth. While he was there he fell in love with a Mason and Hamlin organ and purchased it instead of the piano. That fall of 1882 Elizabeth had another baby boy they named Richard. The family was growing and fortunately times were prosperous for Richard. His horses of different kinds were in demand for both sport and travel and cattle were selling well. Often his Hambletonian purebreds won on the racetracks and as trotters. After visiting a prominent citizen of Collinston, Elizabeth went into the cheese business. This was a great advantage to the family. On September 8th 1882 Richard became a United States citizen. He was 56 years old. In about 1883, Patriarch John Smith and his wife came to visit Willow Springs. After the visit Mrs. Smith spread rumors that she believed Elizabeth's maid to be a plural wife to Richard. From appearances this was not unusual because the maid was a fine looking woman and was treated as a daughter. Her father was a plaster of paris decorator who had been injured. She was given the job to help out her family. As a result Richard was arrested. He hired James H. Hawley who had a fine reputation as a lawyer in Idaho and though he was not a church member, was an honorable man. After spending a lot of money Richard was freed of the charge. In December of 1884, yet another son, Robert was born and the following summer Richard took Elizabeth and her children to Montpelier to visit the Bowens, relatives of hers. In 1885 the law called "test oath" was embodied in the territorial law of Idaho. It was approved by Governor Bunn and affirmed by the courts of Idaho. The law required that every person desiring to have his name registered as a voter must take an oath that he did not belong to an order that taught, advised or encouraged the practice of bigamy or polygamy or any other crime defined by law. This practically disfranchised the Mormons of Idaho. It also became almost impossible to get an unprejudiced jury when Mormons were on trial. A neighbor took advantage of the conditions and took Richard to court over water rights. This man, John Hurst, had a brother who said he could get away with murder, which later came to pass. When the court date arrived, Richard's lawyer was a little late and the case was rushed through in favor of John Hurst. All this trouble kept Richard away from home and cost a great deal of money. He borrowed $800 from an old friend, Jenkin Jones, and bought a flowing well digger and dug a well. Going down about seventy feet seemed to always bring the necessary water. In November of 1885 Richard took a fourth wife in polygamy, by the name of Martha Davis. In January of 1887, in the depth of winter Elizabeth brought another son into the world. He was named Wilford. In June of 1887 Richard and Elizabeth went to Logan to take out their second endowments in the Logan Temple and then in 1889 they sent their first son off to college. The family was affluent enough to pay for a housekeeper for their children as they went away to the Brigham Young College in Logan City. In fact, three of the children were preparing to go to college there when Elizabeth had another baby in 1889, Seymour Lawrence. 1890 was an eventful year for Richard. This was also the year that Richard's second oldest daughter by Rebecca passed away at the age of 34 and his fourth wife Martha gave birth to a baby girl Lavinia. Then in August of 1891, twin girls came along to Elizabeth. The midwife was late in arriving and one was born dead. She was named Martha and the living twin, Letitia. Moses went off to Harvard and Elizabeth never really recovered after the last birth. Richard was still one of the seven Presidents of the Seventies, and also organized a Mass Quorum in the Malad Valley by order of Joseph A. Young. He made long drives to hold meetings with some of his members. One trip was so cold he almost perished. On recovering he went for a sleigh ride with Elizabeth. A hired man was the driver and when one of the horses, a newly broken young mare freed herself of the bridle, the hired man was confused and awkward. Richard leapt from the sleigh to the mare's head and replaced the bridle. From then on he complained of a pain in the chest but at times seemed perfectly well. His condition was referred to as Neuralgia of the heart. His condition caused him to become semi-retired and he spent his time more than ever training his horses. During the summer of 1892 Richard's weak heart made him almost an invalid and Elizabeth was left with a lot of responsibility. She had to pay the interest on the money they had borrowed and she would never miss paying tithing. She had to hire farm help. By the fall he was almost bed fast and on October 5th, just after his daughter Emily had bathed his feet, he passed away. On his last day he kept control of himself but there was a tear in his eye. He asked Emily to fetch his private books and watch and other things important to him. After looking them over he gave them to her. Among the things was a buckskin he used to cut strings from. Towards midday was when Emily helped him into bed after bathing his feet and within a few moments he was gone. She writes: "I laid him out, kissed him and closed his eyes. He was sweet to the last. His breath was sweet and his skin clear because he never had a bad disease, just an injured heart after a busy life at home and abroad." He was buried at Willard. The information from the above story came primarily from Richard's own writings and the notes of his daughter Emily Davis Schettler.   JOURNAL OF RICHARD DAVIS p.1 The journal of Richard Davis, son of William Davis. My mother’s name was Gwenllian. I was born in “Gynllwun du,” and I am one of nine children. The _________ died in 1838, August. And in the month after that, i.e., September, I was born in the year 1826, and I am 26 years old as I write this account. There were 4 brothers and 5 girls. Their names are as follows: Margret, Mary, J____, William, Richard, Gwenllian, David, Ann, Thomas. p.2 A journal giving a little of the story of my life. I am writing on 12 June 1852. My name is Richard j. Davis. I was born in the parish of Ystrad Pafodog in Glamorganshire in a place called “Cynllwun-du,” a farm in the parish. Now I shall proceed with the next thing, and first to give a little account of my ancestors. I have searched a lot for them but there are many things missing as yet, but I shall put down as much detail as I can according to what I know beginning with my gather and mother. p.3 My father and mother were married in the year ______ in the church of Ystrad. The name of the priest who married them was Richard Prichard. Nine children were born to them. I shall name them as follows beginning with the oldest. First, the three girls: first, Margret; 2nd, Marey; 3rd, Jane; 4th, William, the oldest brother; 5th, myself, my name is Richard as I said; 6th, Gwenllian, the 4th girl; 7th, David, the 3rd boy; 8th, Ann, the 5th girl; p.4 9th, Thomas, the 4th boy and the youngest. My father was buried when I was in my 14th year, i.e., in the year 1842, September the 5th, he died; on the 7th day he was placed in the grave in the cemetery of the meeting house of Baletys in front of the door of the meeting house in the Parish of Ystrad. I shall proceed to write the ancestors of my father first. p.5 My father was the son of David Jinkins, born in the Parish of Ystrad. He had four boys. I shall name them as follows: first, Jinkin; 2nd, William (i.e., my father); 3rd, Davidd; 4th, Thomas, the youngest brother. He had 3 daughters; 1st, Ann; 2nd, Jenat; ______ Mary; 3rd, Pegi. p.6 And I called Margret “Rit.” My grandfather was the son of Edwart Jinkins. He had 6 boys. I shall name them as follows: 1st Davidd (i.e., my grandfather); 2nd, Jinkin; 3rd, William; 4th, Thomas; 5th, Richard; 6th, Edwart; 7th, John. He had 4 daughters: 1st, Ann; 2nd, Ann 3rd, Mary; 4th, Chathren. Those are the children p.7 of Edwart Jinkins (i.e., their names). My fathers grandfather, Edwart Jinkines, i.e., my great grandfather, was the son of Thomas Jinkins. He had two sons, 1st, Edwart, i.e., my great grandfather; 2nd, Jinkin. I do not know if he had more or not. Thomas Jinkin had one brother, and his name was Edwart p.8 Jinkins. These two brothers came to the Parish of Ystrad from Cumnedd. I do now know when they came but Thomas Jinkins was buried in the year 1776. He lived in a place which was called Penrees in the Parish of Ystrad, but I do not know where he was buried. p.9 But my father and grandfather were buried in Ystrad. As I said about my father, I do now have any more information about the people of my father. I shall now write that which I know about the ancestors of me grandmother. She was the daughter of Jinkin Davies, (i.e., the mother of my father), born in Breconshire, Parish of Penderun. Jinkin Davies was p.10 the son of Dafudd Jinkin Dafudd, and he was the son of Jinkin Dafudd. Jinkin Dafudd had two sons, i.e., Dafudd and Richard. It appears that my father was the grandson who descended from Jinkin Dafudd. Jinkin Dafudd was the name of my father’s great grandfather also. That’s all I have to say about the family of my father’s mother as yet. Now I shall proceed p.11 to write the ancestors of my mother. She was the daughter of Richard Thomas of the Parish of Aberdare in Glamorganshire. He (i.e., my grandfather) is still living and turned 92 in February of this year, 1852. My grandmother’s name is Gwenllian. They were married in the Aberdare Church in 1793. She also is living and is 85 years old. p.12 They had 9 children. I shall name them as follows: 1st, Gwenllian (i.e., my mother); 2nd, Richard; 3rd, Mary, who died 2 July 1843 and was buried on the 5th day in the cemetery of the Baletins meetinghouse where it is called “Ynus fach ystrad tafodog,” the same cemetery as my father. She did not have any children. She was a very loveable woman. I was p.13 there when she died; I was between 10 and 11. And I missed her very much, and it was a loss to me and to my brothers and sisters, for she was good to us. Her husband was a very stingy man and he asked me what I would take to stay with him during the winter. I answered (softly) the same thing as anyone p.14 for that. And everyone said that he kept four pounds of money from me, and that if my aunt were alive I would have gotten the money. (I got 26 [shillings] for four months and a fortnight of work.) 4th, Thomas; 5th, David; 6th, Jane; 7th, Rees. He was buried when he was between four and five years old, and my father and he were put in the same grave in front of the door of the meetinghouse as I said. p.15 8th, Robert; 9th, Rees, the second to the youngest. These are the name of the children of Richard Thomas (i.e., my mother’s brother and sisters). Richard Thomas (my grandfather) was the son of Thomas Dafudd Miles. He had 9 children: 1st, Richard, who was buried when he was a year old. After that came the 2nd, Richard (my grandfather); the 3rd, Robert; 4th, Rees; the names of the daughters: 1st, p.16 Margret; 2nd, Marey; 3rd, Jane; 4th, Ann; 5th, Marey (the first died before naming the second); and those are the names of the children of Thomas Dafudd Miles. He was the son of Dafudd Miles. He had 7 children; their names are the following: 1st, Dafudd, 2nd, James; 3rd, Jane; 4th, Marey; 5th, Joan; 6th, Ann; 7th, Cathren. Those are the names of the children of Dafudd Miles. He was the son p.17 of Miles William and one of three children: 1st, Dafudd; 2nd, William, 3rd, Ann; and those are the children of Miles William, and he was the son of William Gibon. He had two children: 1st, Miles; 2nd, Thomas. I do not know if there were more or not – i.e., of William Gibon. He was the son of Gibon Howel; Gibon Howel was the son of Howel Thomas, p.18 and he (i.e., Howel Thomas) is the furthest generation of which I obtained a history. Gibon Howel, the 2nd generation; William Gibon, the 3rd; Miles William, the 4th; Dafudd Miles, the 5th; Thomas Dafudd Miles, the 6th; Richard Thomas, the 7th; and my mother, the 8th. And I myself the 9th. And William , my son, the 10th. That is the pedigree of my mother’s father (i.e., Richard Thomas). Next I shall give the account p.19 of the people of my grandmother, my mother’s mother. She (my grandmother) is the daughter of David Edwart. He had 6 children. Their names are as follows: 1st, Niccollas; 2nd, Richard; 3rd, Edwart; 4th, Cathrin; 5th, Mary; 6th, Gwenllian (i.e., my grandmother). Those are the names of the children of David Edwart. David Edwart was the son of Edwart Jones, and he married two p.20 wives, and he had 6 children by each one. First I shall name the children of the first wife: 1st, Niccollas; 2nd, Richard; 3rd, Dafudd (i.e., my grandfather); 4th, William; 5th, John; 6th, Danial. Those are the children of the first wife. Next I shall name the children of the second wife: 1st, Niccolas; 2nd, Morgan; 3rd, Thomas; 4th, Edwart; 5th, Margret; 6th, John. Those are the names of the children of Edwart Jones. Edwart Jones was the son of John Richard. I do not have any more history of the people of my grandmother. p.21 That is as much of the history of my people which I have at present. My father was buried when I was 14 years old. He strived hard to live and to raise his children. He was never affiliated with any one religion, but when he would go to a meeting of the Baptists he used to listen and read a lot in the Bible. He did not have the privilege of hearing the gospel; p.22 it had not come to this country when he died. He was a very loved man in his neighborhood. And I believe that he would have believed the gospel had he heard it; and I believe that he will yet believe it. My mother’s mother is still alive (i.e., the year of 1852), and she lives in Dinas, and she has been one of the Baptists for 40 years or more. And she is not willing to receive the gospel. p.23 But she does not persecute the servants of God at all as far as I have heard. There is not one of my family except for William, my oldest brother, and myself who have obeyed the gospel as far as I know at present. We have testified to the greater part of them, that is, to those of them who are the closest, and I intend to get to see many of them before going to Zion (next spring). p.24 Next I shall give a little of my history before coming to the Church. I left home when I was 17 years old (i.e., that of my mother), because I was pulled out from the works of Dinas and then worked here and there through Glamorganshire and Monmouthshire. I was very angry (?) for about 3 years’ time. But I got fed up with that when I was about 20 years old. And in Llanvabon I first heard the gospel as I recall, p.25 but I did not pay much attention to it at that time. But in some time after that I went to the Saints room in Llanfabon to listen to the Saints preach, and there I was pricked. I do not know the man’s name who was presiding over the branch of Hirwan at that time, and he was a tall man, and I heard that he left before I came to the Church. That is a short abridgement of my history before I came to the Church, i.e., the Church of Jesus Christ. p.26 I did not come back to the Church for years after that, I know not how long. I came to Llanilltid Fardre the Wednesday after Whitsun the year of 1847, and there I saw Rebecca, my wife. I married her in July of 1849 in the Church of Llanilltid Fardra. The name of the priest was James Thomas. She [my wife] is the daughter of Lewis Morgans from Llast, the parish of Llanilltid Fardre, and Margret, the daughter of Philip Philips, a native of Breconshire, and she was born (i.e., my mother-in-law)…[An incomplete sentence] I do not have any of the history of my wife’s people at present. If I can get the history of some of them I shall write it all later. Now I shall give an account of my coming into the Church, i.e., The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I was baptized p.27 23 January 1851 by Thomas Jones, a priest of the Llantrisant Branch. I was confirmed an official member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on the 26th of January under the hands of Thomas Morgan, the Branch President of Llantrisant. I was called to be a priest and ordained on April 11th by William Jones, a traveling elder. After that I was called to be an elder. I was ordained 21 May 1851 by William Jones, a traveling elder. p.28 I did not keep a detailed account of my activities in the year of 1851, but I shall record that which I can get a hold of in the journal. I sold two shillings worth of various pamphlets to a man by the name of Evan William, a good and very wealthy man, an he received the “Udgorn” [the Welsh Mormon periodical] from me every fortnight and the Book of Mormon and other pamphlets from time to time. p.29 And he paid for all of them. I sold a great number of books to the inhabitants of the place. I received ten copies of the Book of Mormon myself and I have a accounting for all the money which I paid for the books and other things nearby. In Llantrisant I preached for the first time ever. I preached a lot in Llanilltid and went from house to house testifying and selling books. p.30 And it was in my house that the brethren slept when they came by. And I clothed them and gave to many of them money to satisfy their needs. And they were respected by Rebecca, my wife, and they testify to that about her. Now I began to write the account of my labor in May of 1852. In that month there was and accident in Aberdar. p.31 The damp [noxious gas] caught fire in Mr. T. Powell’s mine where 67 men were killed, and 14 of them were Saints; and two of my sisters margret’s children were there. Their names were William and John. William was the oldest. His age was 16 in November 1852. John’s age was 11 in April 1852. They were very pure, wise and thoughtful children, and we loved them dearly. p.32 On the 19th of this month I fasted on behalf of some persons that they would have strength to obey the gospel. Their names are as follows: John Arthur, William Thomas, singer, John William, miller. 23rd – I was at the house of my grandmother getting the history of my pedigree from her and testified to them about the gospel. 24th – I was at the Council in Pontytupridd where I used to p.33 go regularly on the 31st of the month on the last day. That time Evan Williams, President, and Rees Jenkins, Teacher, and myself were fasting on behalf of the honest people n the area. From 9:00 a.m. until the nest morning we did not eat or drink any kind of drink. I have nothing else to relate this month. June 1852, 6th day – in a meeting of the Saints in m house. p.34 7th day – in a council in Pontytypridd. 8th – in a prayer meeting in my own house. 10th – in a meeting of the Saints in my own house. I taught there. 12th – I said my morning prayers at 8:00 and at 11:00 was in a preaching meeting by the Church (i.e., the Church of Llanilltid). At 2.)) – in a meeting of the Saints in my house and in my house we held meetings of the Saints. p.35 15th – in a prayer meeting in the house of Evan Williams, Llynnos, and I was in Dinas inquiring the names of those who intend to go to Zion, and I gather a lot of money. I slept there that night . 18th – I was around the place throughout the day and at the mine also. I went home that night and to the meeting of the Saints. 19th – I went up to Llanvabon to collect money p.36 from among the world. I got a lot through trying here and there. 20th day – I said my prayers in Llanvabon at 8:00 a.m. At 11:00 – at Pontytypridd. At 2:00 – in Pontytypridd. At 5:00 – in Llanilltid in a preaching meeting. 21st – in council in Pontytypridd. 22nd – I was around inquiring about the Book of Mormon to find them and to sell books. 24th – in a prayer meeting in my own house. p.37 I collected money. 26th – Traveled around. 27th – I said my prayers at 8:30 a.m. At 11:00 by the Church in a preaching meeting. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints. I taught the Saints to keep themselves clean always. So this month ended. July 1852. The 1st – I fasted from food and drink from 10:00 a.m. until the next morning p.38 on behalf of the men who were honest in heart. 4th – I said my prayers at 8:30 a.m. At 11:00 I preached by Olibuch. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints. I taught the brothers and sisters to strive to keep the teachings of the servants of God. At 5:00 I preached by Efilisia [Efail-isaf]. 4th – I was at the council in Pontytypridd. 6th – I tried to collect money to go to Zion. 7th – In Llantrisant _________. p.39 8th – in a prayer meeting in my own house. 9th – My wife and I fasted on behalf of the little boy for him to have health, and he received a blessing. 1st – in a conference in Merthyr Tydfil. 13th – I was on the hill praying. 15th – I baptized a boy 25 years old. 18th – in a meeting of the Saints in my house. p.40 I taught there briefly. 22nd – in a prayer meeting in my house. 25th – I said my prayers in the morning. At 11:00 – in a preaching meeting by Thriorshw {place name}. I preached there myself. 28th – I took books around and books to the subscribers and sold books also. 30th – I spend a day working in Penris [Pen-rhys]. I received 1 shilling 6 pence for my work. That is the end of this month, i.e., the month of July 1852. p.41 August 1852. I said my prayers in the morning. At 11:00 I was released to go with my brother , Dafu, Because he had come to see me from Penrus Ystrad Tafodog [Pen-rhys Ystradygodwg] to Llanilltyd. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints. The president called on me to teach at the end of the meeting. I encouraged the Saints to be brave and to recognize their places and to be diligent in the work of God. p.42 At 6:00 p.m. I preached at Pontytypridd. 3rd – a man by the name of John Williams was in the Cross Inn lecturing about the geography of California. He was a minister with the Independents, and he praised the Saints and their establishment. 6th – in Llantrisiant requesting money. 7th – at home writing. 8th – I said my morning prayers. p.43 At 11:00 – at Olibuch preaching. At 2:00 in a meeting of the saints I taught the Saints to recognize the government of God. At 5:00 – at Efilisia [Efail-isaf] in a preaching meeting. 9th – I started on my way. 15th – I arose this morning in Abardar and went to a meeting of the Saints at 11:00 a.m. 16gh – in the council at Pontytpridd. 19th – in a prayer meeting in my house. 22nd – I was in the place p.44 which is called Grosfan [Groesfaen] preaching in the morning at 11:00. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints in Llanilltyd in my own house. The president called me to teach. I exhorted them to strive to prepare them to come to Zion. At 5:00 p.m. – in a preaching meeting by Olibuch. 23rd – in a prayer meeting in my house. 26th – in a meeting of the Saints in my house. I taught about the perpetual emigrating fund. 29th – I said my prayers in the morning. In a meeting of the Saints at 2:00. I went to Pontytypridd in the evening to fetch my wife home p.45 after sending Dafudd, my brother, home from Llanilltyd. He had been in our house. That’s the end of this month, i.e., August. Next, September 1852. 2nd – a meeting of the Saints was held in my home, R.J. Daves. I began the meeting with prayer. Evan Williams and I ordained Rees Jenkens a priest and William Owen a teacher. I was voice in ordaining William Owen. I taught them their duties. p.46 5th – I said my morning prayers. At 11:00 by Olibuch preaching. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints in Bro. William Owen’s house. I taught the brethren to be more enthusiastic with the work of God and to strive to pay for books and so on in the future. 9th – I began with prayer. The president called on me to teach. I taught them what was the government of God. I exhorted them to strive to recognize the government of God. 12th- the Sabbath. I said my prayers at 8:00 a.m. p.47 2nd of October 1852. I was collecting names in Bwll-y-waunwullt. I went to the town of Llanilltyd to sleep that night. 3rd – I took my wife to Merthyr to the Conference. We slept at the Star that night. My wife was not feeling well because she had miscarried lately. But her faith was strong in the servants of God and she was desirous of being taught by them. And she received a good word from them, and they all love her because it was in our house they used to sleep when thy came to Llanilltyd. And now I, Richard J. Davies, give a good word for Rebecca my wife, for she has been obedient to me continually and has been a good Saint, keeping the word of wisdom, has forsaken tea and has done as we have told her continually, and has been willing to assist the servants of God continually with that which she can in clothes and making them comfortable and well. 4th – I was at the council in the Waytyn Room, Merthyr. I took my wife home that night to Llanilltyd. p.48 5th – I went up to Aberdar to get names. I was in the Plow Room in the Council that night. I slept at my sister’s house that night. 6th – searched for names. I slept at my sister’s house that night. 7th – I went to the Abernant works. I slept at my sister’s house that night. 8th – I tried to go to the Aberaman pits but failed. 9th – I collected money around. 10th – the Sabbath. At 11:00 a.m. – in the Plow Room in a preaching meeting. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints in the Well Charp Room in the village of Aberdar. Pres. D Roberts called on me to teach. I taught them to love the servants of God who continued to preside over them. 6th – in the afternoon in a preaching meeting in the Plow Room. 11th – I went to request work up at the Plow pits form David Jones, foreman. I was unable to get any. 12th – I went to request work from Richard Williams. I was successful. 13th – I worked. 14th – I worked during the day and at 7:00 in the evening I was with my wife in a meeting of the Saints in the Plow Room. 15th – I worked. 16th – I worked. p.49 17th – I woke up in Treaman and went on the train to Trefforast and to Llanilltyd home. At 11:00 a.m. in the school. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints. The president called on me to teach. I exhorted them to love one another and to defend each other and to sustain one another. I ended with prayer. I collected the branch accounts. 18th – I went to Merthyr to pay 3 pounds of prepayment in order to go to Zion in the emigration in January 1853. From there I went to Aberdar to my job across the mountain. 17th – I worked. I was in the meeting in the Plow Room in the evening at 7:00. 20th – at work. 21st – at work. I was in the meeting of the Saints at 7:00 in the evening in the Plow Room. 22nd – at work. 23rd – I was around collecting money. 24th – the Sabbath. I said my morning prayers. I went to get some medicine form a doctor of the Saints who used herbs, and went to him to tell him the circumstances of my wife, and he gave me a small bottle to use in tea leaves, and he charged 3 shillings for it. It helped her greatly. In a preaching meeting at 11:00 a.m. in the Plow Room. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints in the Cwmbach Branch. p.50 Pres. Jn Lewelin called on me to teach. I spoke briefly a little before Thomas Pugh, the Conference President. At 6:00 – in the afternoon I preached in the Plow Room. 25th – worked. 26th – worked. I was at the council in the Plow Room at 7:00 in the evening. 27th – worked. 28th – worked. I was at the meeting of the Saints at 7:00 in the evening in the Plow room. 29th – worked. 30th – worked. 31st – Sabbath. I said my morning prayers at 8:00. At the meeting of the Saints at 2:00. At 6:00 p.m. – in a preaching meeting in the Plow Room. That is the end of the Month of October. November1852 The first day – at work breaking coal. 2nd – at work. 3rd – at work. 4th – at work and in a meeting of the Saints at 7:00p.m. 5th – at work. 6th – at work 7th – Sabbath and I said my morning prayers. At 11:00 I went to the Aberaman Branch meeting. We were there until 3:00 in the afternoon fasting our lunch. At 6:00 p.m. – in a preaching meeting at the same branch. 8th – worked. 9th – worked. p.51 10th - worked. 11th – worked. 12th – worked. 13th – worked in the morning. I went on the train to Pontytpridd to the house of Mr. Goodman, the watchmaker to fetch my watch. I went to Llanilltyd from there to the house of Bro. William Owen and them to where I made my home. After I sold him my furniture I collected the branch reports until 9:00 o’clock. 14th – I said my prayers at 8:30 a.m. William Owen and I went to a farmhouse by the name of “Ty y Person a Llygra.” We testified there about Joseph Smith and taught them the principles. At 2:00 – in a meeting of the Saints at the home of Brother Owen. President Williams called on me to teach. I taught the government of God. Then in the evening I took books to the distributors. 15th – I arose at Llanilltyd and went on the train to Aberdar. I worked through the day. 16th – worked. 17th – worked. 18th – worked. I was at a meeting of the Saints in the evening at 7:00. 19th – composed a hymn at the home of Dewi Elfad Jones. 20th – worked. I went to Llanilltyd on the train at 6:00 in the evening. 21st – Sabbath. I said my morning prayers. After that I went to inform p.52. the people that Dewi Elfad Jones and John Edmwns, the branch president of Aberaman, would be preaching at the home of William Owen at 11:00 a.m. And at 2:00 I was in the meetings throughout the day. 22nd – I went up to Aberdar on the train. 23rd – I went to Merthur across the mountain of Aberdar and to the home of President Phillips to get my instructions from him with respect to the emigration to Zion because I am short of the amount to go with the men who can pay 10 pounds. I needed 30 pounds to take my wife and son, William, who was two years old the 29th of November of 1852, and he counseled me to go to my family and try to obtain the money. And I went and collected about 3 pounds and 10 shillings through my efforts. I walked Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and Saturday for the money, and Evan Williams, the Llanilltyd Branch President, was with me on Saturday, and it was 11:00 o’clock before we got home. 28th – the Sabbath. I was in Pontytpridd preaching. 29th – I went from Llanilltyd to Aberdar on the train. 30th – worked. And so this month came to an end, i.e., November 1852. Next, December 1852. One the first day I worked. 2nd – worked. p.53 The third day – worked and in a meeting of the Saints at 7:00 in the evening in the Aberaman Branch. I began the meeting with prayer. I taught the Saints to take care to keep the spirit of God with them and so on and so forth. 4th – worked. I went to Llanilltyd to sleep that night. 5th – Sabbath day. I said my morning prayers. At the meeting of the Saints at 2:00. I taught about the persecutions and so on and so forth. I ended the meeting with prayer. 6th – I went from Llanilltyd to Merthyr to the home of President Phillips to pay 15 pounds of money for the emigration, i.e., 5 pounds each for myself and my wife and the boy, which was to be sent ahead of time for each traveler for the purpose of buying the necessary things for the journey. 7th – I went to the job and in the evening I was at the council. That night I strained my leg and knee. I was unable to work on the 8th. On the 9th I fasted my lunch to get better. I was unable to work on the 10th and 11th. 12th – Sabbath day. I said my morning prayers. I read at home all day. 13th – I was unable to work. p.54 On the 14th and the 15th and the 16th and the 17th and the 18th I was unable to work because of have strained my leg. It happened that a boy who was boarding at my sister’s house where I was staying at that time had a nosebleed and it was bleeding for about four hours. And they wanted to call a doctor for him because it was running fast and weakening him greatly. And he was a brave lad ready to do good to any man. And as it continued to bleed I went into my room to pray for God to spare his life. And I went to him in full faith and laid my hand on him praying for the Lord to stop his blood from flowing. And immediately it stopped, and I thanked God for his goodness. This happened on the 17th of this month, i.e., December 1852. 19th – Sabbath day. I said my morning prayers. I went to the meeting at 11:00 a.m. to the Plow branch and at 6:00 in the evening I was called on to sing form the new hymn book, i.e., “Cenedloedd y byd sy’n gwawdio’n drahaus” [The nations of the world who scorn haughtily -- #458 in the 1852 Welsh Mormon hymnal], and so on and so forth. p.55 20th, Monday – I went to Doctor Williams Philips who lived in Monmouthshire at a place called Pentwum Mawr which was very strange_____________, and I believed that my leg was out of place and it turned out to be so, and he set it in its place. It cost 8 shillings. I had 9 miles to walk from there to the train. I walked them with my leg held in place by a big brace. I went to my sister Mary’s house in Abergwuddon two miles further. I slept there that night and I was very tired. I stayed there until Friday. On the 24th I started home to Aberdar that night to sleep at home of Margret, my sister, and her husband. And I was very tire because of my let. 25th – Christmas. I was at home the greater part of the day. I was at the meeting of the Saints in the Plow Room in the evening at 6:00. We had and enjoyable time there. There was a little dancing and stepping there and singing and talking. We were edified greatly. p.56 26th- Sabbath day. Elder Pugh and Elder Evan Williams and Freewas with me. We went to the meeting at 11:00 a.m. at Plow Branch and at 2:00 and at 6:00 in the evening. 27th – I was at a concert at the Aberaman Branch. 28th – I began to work and that was the first day since the 7th of this month because of the injury to my leg. In the afternoon I went to Merthyr to the Council to listen to the brethren from the Valley, i.e., Captain Jones and his two companions. 29th – worked. I got very tired working because of walking to Merthyr while I was lame. And it was one o’clock by the time I came home from Merthyr. 39th – worked in the morning. A messenger came to fetch me out because of Brother Pugh. 31st – I went to work, and as I was working I put my leg out of place again. I went out immediately and sent for the doctor immediately to try to get my leg in place. He failed to do me any good, and it caused me pain as he tried to set it in its place. p.57 I borrowed six shillings from my sister, Margaret, and went on the train to Cardiff and from there to Casnewudd and from Casnewudd to Bonewudd on the train. I walked from there a mile and a half to the doctor and I had heard about him before, i.e., the son of Mary from Benar, and by the time I got there he was not at home, I walked back to Bonewudd. I went on the train from there to Abergwuddon to the home of my sister, Mary, and there I slept that night and was very tired. January 1, 1853. I stayed at the home of my sister that day. The 2nd day – the Sabbath. I went on the train to Bonewudd and from there to the home of the doctor again and he tried to get my leg back in place. He failed to do me any good. I went from there to the home of a brother by the name of Thomas. I got food there from his wife. I started form there to Llanfabon. I slept at the home of Alban Jenkens. I arose on the 3rd and went on the train to Troed-y-riw. I walked to Merthyr from there because my money was gone. I was at the council in the Wyit Room. I went from there to the home of Bro. p.58 Philips to ask him if he would anoint my leg. He did so immediately, and I received the blessing and my leg went back into place. I slept at the Weit that night. I got up and went to Aberdar across the mountain with two other brothers. I went on the train to Trefforast and from there to Llanilltud. I slept at the home of William Owen. 5th – I requested work from Evan Williams because that was the job that I had when I hurt my leg. 6th – I collected money for books. I slept at the home of Wm Owen. 7th – I went on the train to Mount Anach’s. I collected and settled things. I came on the 8th day on the trains to Pontytypridd and fro there to Llanilltud to the home of Wm Owen and slept there that night. There also my wife used to stay frequently after we sold to them our household items, and they always received us graciously. 9th – Sabbath day. I went to Pontytypridd this morning to p.59 meet with my family at the house of William, my brother. They had promised to meet me there before we left for Zion. None of them came except for Margret, my sister. I met two at the Pont Branch. I taught there about the growth of the Church and the new revelations which were being proclaimed through the Udgorn [Welsh Mormon periodical]. I preached there at 6:00 p.m., and I took my wife to Llanilltud to sleep at the house of William Owen. 10th – I prepared to work at the mine of Evan Williams. 11th - I began to work for Evan Williams. 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th – worked. I presided over a meeting of the Saints the 13th at the house of William Owen at 7:00 p.m. 16th – Sabbath day. I said my prayers in the morning. I went to the farmhouse called Tu Person to offer books to them. At 2:00 at the meeting of the Saints. I taught there that they should always be ready to free themselves from the bonds of tradition. I ended the meeting with prayer. 17th – worked. 18th – worked. 19th – at home. 20th – worked. That is the last day p.60 I worked. That night I was informed that I was to be in Liverpool the last day of this month. 21st – I went to see my relatives. I walked 30 miles. My feet were frightfully sore, and I was not in a bed that night in order to make preparations for the journey. 23rd – I went to Merthyr to counsel with President W. S. Philips. I came back to Llanilltyd to sleep at the house of William Owen. 24th – I was in Merthyr again. I walked from Llanilltyd to counsel as I was advised the previous day. 25th – we started on the way to Zion. I took my wife and son to Swansea. 26th – at 5:00 a.m. I went to the packet. At 4:30 on the 28th we reached Liverpool. We lodged at the house of Mr. D. James. February 5th, 1853. We went on board the ship “Jersey” to travel to New Orleans. The journey took us six weeks ____________. We went from the ship to a packet by the name of “Simons” in New Orleans, and we went on that to Saint Louis along the Mississippi River. p.61 We went on another packet 250 miles along the Mississippi River to a town by the name of Keock in the State of Iowa, North America. We stayed there for nine weeks. We started from there to a place by the name of Montrose, 12 miles further up the river. I was at that time able to swim. We were there for a month and from there we began the journey in wagons over to Kensail Blyffs [Council bluffs]. We camped there for a week along the Missouri River. We crossed the river in rafts and to the country of the Indians. We traveled this country across rock, rivers and mountains. On the 10th day of October we arrived at Great Salt Lake City. We stayed 4 days in the City. I got a place for me and my wife 10 miles to the North. I worked in this place for about two months until the snow came to keep me from working. My wife and I received our patriarchal blessings under the hand of old p.62 father John Smith, the head Patriarch of the Church at that time. December 10th. 1854. A daughter was born to me and Rebecca, my wife. We called her Margret Elen. We lived at that time in a valley of the Mountains in a place called Welo Crik [Willow Creek]. July 30, 1856. A child was born to me by Rebecca, my wife. Her name was called Rebecca Jen; we had received our endowments in June 1856, i.e., the previous month. January 24, 1858. A daughter was born to me and my wife, Rebecca. We called her Ann Gwenllian. October 7, 1859. A son was born to me and Rebecca, my wife. We named him Richard Elies. I baptized my son William, on May 22. He was confirmed under the hands of Brother Cordon. [Note: pages 63 and 64 are in English and need no translation] They appear to be simple sentences for the purpose of practicing English grammar. p.65 In 1854 I was called to preside over the quorum of Elders of Wello Crik. I had great success and strength from God to keep order according to the law of the Church. I was released February 5th, 1859. I was ordained one of the Seventies on the 3rd of February and one of the presidents on the _____________. I was called as a counselor to the Bishop, Brother Alfrad Cordon on the 13th of September. I raised jealousy in the hearts of some of the brethren against me, and they brought accusations against me which were lies. Charles W. Hobart began; Evan E. Williams and Musaac S. Williams helped him. C. Hobart broke out in the quorum of the high priests in my presence of being dishonest. E. E. Williams and M. S. Williams were his witnesses. These brethren were called to a meeting with the authorities at the home of Bro. Harding to look into the matter. They were proved liars, and Bro. C. W. Hobart was to ask forgiveness the following Sabbath in front of the meeting, which he did. p.66 I strived to help the bishop to overcome the evil influences in the Ward and to establish peace among the Saints. The Bishop, i.e., Bro. A. Cordon, is a good man and tries to do good for us and to assist in establishing the kingdom of God. So my account is brief until 19 February 1860. So I served as counselor to the bishop and continue to do so until the present time, i.e., the year 1863, January 24th. And my desire has not diminished to assist in whatever way I can to establish the kingdom of god on the earth in the latter days. I built a stone house with seven rooms. It is reputed to be one of the best homes in the state. I was persistent in gathering the materials together and through the blessings of God I finished the task. [Translated from the original Welsh journal of Richard J. Davis by Ronald D. Dennis, 1529 W. 1170 North, Provo, Utah 84604, in 1982.] JOURNAL EXCERPTS OF RICHARD JENKINS DAVIS Preface The following document is typed from a very poor copy. Source and location of original unknown. Names of Welsh towns and locations are not known and in the essence of time have not been researched. The document appears to be a summary of journal entries originally made by Richard J. Davis but re-written and condensed by daughter Emily Elizabeth Davis Schettler. Some spelling errors are noted and every attempt has been made to retain copy originals. Some blanks appear where the copy is not legible. The copy used for this electronic file in possession of Jerri Adams. Electronic file transcribed by Sandy Adams Hand Dec. 2000. Excerpts From the Record Book of Emily Elizabeth Davis Shettler My father Richard Jenkins Davis was born September 3, 1826 in Cynllwun-du (the family farm house) Ystrad – Tafody Parish Glamorganshire, South Wales and died October 5, 1892 in Willow Springs, Oneida County, Idaho and buried in Willard City Utah Cemetery. His family lived in Rhondda Valley, Ponty-Gwaith and Pontypridd South Wales for many generations. He joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints January 23, 1851 and was baptized the same day in the city of Llanylltydfardre Parish Glamorganshire South Wales and confirmed by Thomas Morgan who was President of the Llantrisaint Branch of the church. He was ordained a Priest April 11, 1851 by William Jones, a travelling Elder in Merthyr Tydfil and ordained an Elder the next month May 21, 1851 by William Jones and appointed First Counsellor to the President of the Lantwit Branch of the Church. He started his emigration to Utah January 25, 1853, leaving Pontypridd for Swansea from where he sailed for Liverpool in company of his wife Rebecca and son William who was then two years old. The three sailed from Liverpool February 5, 1853 on the ship “Jersey” for New Orleans. The voyage was exactly six weeks. At New Orleans they boarded the river streamer “John Simons” and sailed up the Mississippi River to Keokuk, Iowa stopping only at St. Louis a short time. At Keokuk they remained 9 weeks and then were sent up the river 12 miles to Montrose where they remained four weeks. They then went to Council Bluffs where they took one week gathering provisions to make the trip across the plains. QUOTE “After rather a hard journey suffering for want of provisions we arrived in Salt Lake City October 10, 1853.” They lived with old Father Call ten miles north of Salt Lake where my father, Richard J. Davis worked that year until arrival of deep snow made it impossible to continue. In the Spring of 1854 they moved to Willard City then known as Willow Creek, where in the fall of the same year Richard J. Davis was called to preside over a Quorum of Elders. On February 3, 1859 the 59th Quorum of Seventy was organized and he was ordained and was set apart as one of the Seven Presidents at the same time. September 13, 1859 he was called to be a Counsellor to Bishop Alfred Cardon and held the position until the April Conference of the Church in 1865 when he was called on a mission to Wales. From the time he arrived in Willard to the time he left Willard, April 30, 1865 to go on his mission to Wales, he completed the building of his home in Willard. The home which was actually finished in 1861, and located in the central part of the town, consisted of a two story house constructed of rock, a rock _______ all surrounded by a rock wall. The rock was taken from the mountains of Willard. After some preparation in Salt Lake City he commenced his journey to his mission field May 23, 1865 in company with others. First day out – camped on Big Canyon Creek. Second day spent in camp fixing wagons and waiting for rest of company to come up. Third day, May 25, Traveled up Parley’s Canyon to Silver Creek at the head of the canyon. Fourth day, May 26 , Moved on and camped at Church Pastures within three miles of Echo Canyon. Fifth day, May 27, Moved camp up Echo Canyon seven miles and waited for the rest of the company to come up. Sixth day, May 28, Moved up the canyon and camped at Cache Cave at the head of Echo Canyon. Seventh day, May 29, Moved camp and nooned on Bear River – travelled on in the afternoon and camped over night on Quaken – Asp Ridge. Eighth day - May 30 - Moved camp and nooned near Bridger and camped on Black’s Fork over night. Ninth day - May 31 - Moved camp and nooned on Ham’s Fork, camped over night by the Ferry. Tenth day - June 1 - Moved on to Green River, twenty-two miles, crossed Ham’s Fork and Green River in ferry boats. Eleventh day - June 2 - Moved camp and traveled twenty-eight miles camped over night on Big Sandy “waters are deep”. Twelfth day - June 3 - Moved and crossed Little Sandy, nooned on Dry Sandy camped by the Pacific Springs over night, the camp all in good order. Thirteenth day - June 4 - Went over the South Pass moved on the Rocky Ridge camped by Antelope Springs over night. Fourteenth day - June 5 - Moved camp nooned by Spring, camped on Sweet Water over night, traveled thirty miles. Fifteenth day - June 6 - Moved down the river about twenty-five miles, camped by the river over night. Sixteenth day - June 7 - Moved and nooned by Independence Rock camped over night on Greece Wood Creek. Seventeenth day - June 8 - Moved camp and nooned on Willow Springs, camped in the evening on the Platte River. Eighteenth day - June 9 - Moved camp 4:00 A.M. camped at Platte Bridge for breakfast and then traveled on and nooned on the Platte camped twenty miles below the upper bridge. Nineteenth day - June 10 - Moved and camped on Deer Creek for breakfast camped on the Platte over night travelled thirty miles. Twentieth day - Sunday June 11 - Moved camp and breakfasted then travelled on and camped on the Platte over night. Twenty first day - June 12 - Moved and camped over night on Box Elder Springs. Twenty second day - June 13 - Moved and breakfasted on the Platte, travelled on and camped on the Platte over night. Twenty third day - June 14 - Moved and breakfasted in Fort Laramie, moved on and camped ten miles below Laramie over night. Twenty fourth day - June 15 - Travelled about thirty miles down the Platte River. Twenty fifth day - June 16 - Travelled thirty miles and camped over night close to the Chimney Rock. Twenty sixth day - June 17 - Moved and after travelling a mile or two came across a man’s body who had been killed the night before by the Indians, camped over night thirty miles below Chimney Rock. Twenty seventh day - Moved on down the Platte. June 18th Twenty eighth day - June 19 - Moved – passed Ash Hollow camped over night on the Platte three miles below Wolf – Creek. Twenty ninth day - June 20 - Moved on down the Platte. Thirtieth day - June 21 - Moved on and crossed Bluff’s Fork and several little creeks camped on Platte over night. Thirty first day - June 22 - Moved passed Pony Springs seven miles and camped over night. Thirty second day - June 23 - Travelled thirty miles and camped on the Platte. Thirty third day - June 24 - Moved on and camped over night by a hollow before coming to Buffalo Creek. Thirty fourth day - June 25 - Moved on and crossed Buffalo Creek and breakfasted on Elam Creek, camped over night at Cornney. Thirty fifth day - June 26 - Travelled down Wood River camped over night by Wood River Center. Thirty sixth day - June 27 - Moved and crossed Wood River Bridge and breakfasted on the Platte – He was very sick from the effect of a cold, camped over night on Platte. Thirty seventh day - June 28 - He was still very sick, the camp moved on and crossed Loope’s Fork and camped near Columbia City. Thirty eighth day - June 29 - Moved on passed Columbia and Bonnes Cities, camped on Platte overnight. Thirty ninth day - June 30 - Moved on through Vermont City, breakfasted and travelled on to Elkhorn where we camped for dinner, camped over night on Big Papy-Ko Creek within ten miles of Omaha City. Fortieth day - July 1 - Moved on and camped within two miles of Omaha City. He in company with Elias Morris went into the city and had their photographs taken to send home to their families. Forty first day - Sunday July 2 - Attended meeting held in camp, remained in camp all day. Forty second day - July 3 - Visited Omaha returned to camp to sleep. Forty third day, July 4, went to Omaha and sold his horse which he used to cross the plains, and purchased some items to send home to his family. Quote – “I purchased a through ticket to New York. Slept on board the steamer, “Denver”, on the Missouri River. July 5 – Sailed down the Missouri stopped at Wyoming where were camped some saints travelling to Salt Lake Valley. He met Sister Williams from Abaval, Monmouthshire and Sarah Ann Hughs from Swansea who washed his clothes. Brother Barry Wride, one of the missionaries, came into this place and he travelled with Brother Richard J. Davis, my father, all the way to Wales, they even slept together. July 6-7-and 8th – remained in Wyoming all the time. July 9th – took the boat at Wyoming for St. Joseph – arrived the next morning at 5:00 o’clock. July 10 – had breakfast at Alan Hotel in St. Joseph and departed by train at 11:00 P.M. for Quincy. July 11 – left Quincy and arrived in Chicago at 5:00 A.M. the 12th. July 12 – left over the Michigan Central at 6:00 A.M. and arrived in Detroit about 6:00 P.M. went across by steamboat to “Vincent”, started for the Suspension Bridge, arrived there about day-light Thursday the 13th. July13 – spent the day in seeing the city of Niagara including the bridge, the falls, etc. Took the train for New York an arrived in Albany about day-light on Friday July 14 July 14 – left Albany by the Hudson Railway for New York, arrive at noon. Stayed at the Union Hotel – engaged passage on the steamer “Louisiana” for Liverpool. July 15 – at 11:00 A.M. boarded ship for Liverpool. July 16 – head wind July 17 – rough sea, full sails. He was sick all day. July 18 – 19 sick July 20 – 21 – 22 – 23 fair - wind. July 24 – fair - wind – pleasant day. July 25 – Fair day. July 26 – Cloudy and rain. July 27 – Foggy in the A.M. – We came to Queenstown. July 28 – Fine clear day we arrived at Liverpool at 12:00 A.M. July 29 – Saturday remained in Liverpool all day getting some clothes made – met in the evening with the missionaries in the Latter Day Saints’ office. Brother Daniel H. Wells gave some good instructions and appointed him (Richard J. Davis) to travel to South Wales. July 30 – Sunday 11:00 A.M. he preached a sermon in a meeting in the Liverpool Branch. July 31 – Left by train for South Wales arrived at Tredegar that day and slept at the home of John Davies. His (Richard Jenkins Davis) Missionary Labors Commence August 1, 1865 – In the month of August he visited the following places and met the people noted as recorded by him in his diary – Tredegar, Victoria, Merthyr, Aberdare, the home of his relatives – Penyeare, a branch of the Church, Aberaman – Mountain Ash – Cwmbath – Ponty-pridd-rhineferra-arms – Danyllyd Fardre, the home of his wife Rebecca, - Cardiff - Twwn-yr-obyn-day Hill Farm, where his Uncle Rees lived. His brother Thomas accompanied him from Day Hill Farm to Saint Nicholas where he met the brothers of his mother, David Thomas and Robert Thomas and here spent an hour picking nuts which were plentiful. Canton – Whit – Church – Pentyrch Colliers Arms, Lantwit, Llest Farm, Llanyttrd Church, Treforest Newbridge, Rhineperra Arms. – William Lewis, John Davis. August 5, 1865 Saturday – he met William D. Williams the President of the Welsh Mission, William L. Phillips, Barry Wride, Phillips Evans, his sister Ann and Sister-in-law Ann, William Morgan, John Chugg, John Jenkins and Richard Thomas. September 27, 1865 – he went by Cynllwuh – du Farm house where he was born and Pen-Rees Farm where Thomas Jenkins lived – went to Aberdare and on to Aberaman where his sister Ann lived. In this same month of September he went to Aberearm by Crumblm and saw his sister Mary. Then on Crumblm and Aberbig, Victoria to Penycrae. September 11, 1865 – at Tredegar he was sick with Tecdolereaux. September 13-14-15 – went through Rhomney, Llanelly, Breonshire to Blaina then to Abertilieary, Aberbig and Waterloo. September 18 – Monday he baptized Elizabeth Jane ---hias. September 20 – He received a note from William D. Williams President of the Welsh Mission asking him to return to Merthyr. September 25 – He visited his sister Gwenllian at Panty-Gwarth near Cynllwun-du where he was born. October 3 – went to Newport to hear Reverend Spurgeon -- the renouned orator of the world. October 17 – Went to Cardiff visited the Gospel Hall, had a long talk with the Reverend on the Gospel and bore his testimony and left with good feelings. Went to Aberearn and took the train to Romney from there to Crumlyn then walked down the Valley Aberearn to the home of his sister Mary. October 27 – Went to see his neice Catherine about four miles from Merthyr. November 5 – Visited Ystrad Valley and went over the mountains to Vale of Neath. Attended conference in Swansea with William D. Williams President of the Welsh Mission, William S. Phillips, Abel Evens, Elias Morris, Evar A. Richard and Barry Wride. November 12 – visited Mr. Williams at Cefanpenar a very wealthy man. November 20 – visited Bute Docks. November 29 – visited the Priest of Thomas Church of England where he (Richard J. Davis) and Rebecca Morgan were married, at Pentyrch- visited his uncle David Thomas, his mother’s brother, and called on his brother Thomas at Waenfo. January 5, 1866 – he met in General Conference at Farm Street Chapel Birmingham England. Brigham Young Jr. presided – the following spoke – Orson Pratt – N.H. Felt and Brigham Young Jr. Jan. 7 – Elder David P. Kimball presided at conference. January 10 – He visited the museum and a steelpen factory and other places of interest. January 18 – Visited his brother David at Tony-Pandy. January 19 – visited relatives on his father’s side – David Watkins and wife Gwenllian, a very good and well to do family, this family gave the use of their hall “Dare Inn” to hold services. February 19 – He went to Maesy – Fabnor to see his neice Catherine a daughter of his sister. February 20 – He was sent by Elder Abel Evens to labor in Carmarthen-shire conference. He took train at Merthyr for Llanelly. March 13 – He was sent with Elias Morris though the Swansea and Merthyr conferences. March 24 – Saturday – Brigham Young Jr. and Orson Pratt held conference at Merthyr. March 25 – Sunday – He was appointed to preside over the Carmarthen conference. March 26 – He met Abraham Hatch and Abel Evens March 31 – He visited from house to house all the saints in Llanelly Carmarthenshire and was treated with great kindness and gratitude. April 2 – Elias Morris and he (Richard J. Davis) lectured in the “Anthenum” on the American Indians and saints in Utah. April 17 – In Carmarthen he gave a lecture on American Indians and Abel Evens lectured on “Customs of the Mormons in Utah. April 24 – At Llanelly he assisted the Saints prepare for emigration. May 12 – He went to Waenbaylam to the home of Thomas Morgan. June 26 – He went to Kidwelly and slept in the farm house of Mr. Fisher. July 1 – He went to Waenbaylam Branch six miles from Llanelly. July 23 – He went to see the Regatta at Swansea. August 7 – At Tredegar he sang “The Busy Bees of Deseret” in a concert. August 13 – Sunday – He went to Freystrop about two miles from Haverford West where conference was held – He presided twice. August 31 – He went to Tredegar to visit the father and mother of his wife Phoebe. September 3 – He went to Liverpool from Maslen on the steamer and spent the day at the Church at Islington 42. September 4 – He went to the theatre with Elias Morris and Griffith Roberts – He and Griffith Roberts crossed the Mersey River in a boat to Buirkin Head and walked from there to Bookla, twelve miles from Chester. September 7 – He went to Carmarthen. October 24 – He baptized three in Vanyald. November 18 – visited his niece Catherine at Maesy-Fraenor, a farm house in Breonshire. December 2 – Abel Evens died. January 1, 1867 – in Llanelly he went to a social party in company with John D. Rees, the President of the Swansea conference at the time. January 20 – He was in council at _________ _________ Cardiganshire. February 7 – He wrote a letter to Apostle Orson Pratt Liverpool Office which was published in the Millennial Star Saturday March 16, 1867 in Number 11 – Vol.29 – Page 173. March 31 – He went five miles from Llanelly to Waerboglaw. April 22 – He went to Merthyr to a Tea Party and concert April 23 – He went to Aberdare in company with John D. Rees, Barry Wride and Elias Morris from Swansea, went to Mountain Ash to a concert. April 27 – Brother John Parry, the President of the Welsh District, visited the Carmarthen Conference where he (Richard J. Davis) presided. May 11 – He left Llanelly in the morning for Merthyr, called at Swansea and Johh D. Rees joined him and they went to Merthyr where upon their arrival met Elder John Parry, Barry Wride, Elias Morris of the Welsh Mission, Charles W. Penrose from Liverpool office and Frederick C. Henderson, President of the Bristol Conference. May 12 – He was in conference at Aberdare and met Apostle Franklin D. Richards. May 13 – He went to Merthyr and saw a negro performance. June 22 – He went to Neyland, Pembrokeshire and slept at the home of Brother White. June 24 – He crossed the river to Patter and Pembroke Docks – and saw the machinery for ship building. June 25 – Left Neyland and went to Freystrop preached and returned to Neyland. June 27 – He took train at Neyland for Haverford West – was accompanied by Mary Ann Couzzens (note on paper: sister to wife to be – sgh) to Brother William White’s home – departed for Whiteland. August 1 – He took the train at Neath for Bridge End, walked from there to Weck six miles to see his Uncle Richard, his mother’s eldest brother. August 2 – He left Weck in the morning walked six miles to Cow-Bridge – took train to Peter Stone – walked from there to Saint Nicholas to the home of his Uncle David, there met three of his Uncles – David, Robert, and Rees. They treated him very dry and talked very bitter against the Mormons – He bore his testimony to them and they laughed at all he said. At the end of the conversation he felt he could do them no good. He slept at his Uncle David’s home. August 5 – He went to see the castle at Cardiff – saw the dungeon where Robert, the eldest son of the Duke of Normandy or William the Conqueror was for twenty six years as recorded in the history of England. September 4 – He went to see the Grand National Esteddfod in the Grand Pavillion erected for the occasion, there was a very large attendance. September 6 – He went to Haverford – West where he spent the evening with Ellizabeth and Mary Ann Couzzens. He slept at Mrs. Powell’s home. September 19 – He wrote a letter to Apostle Lorenzo Snow. November 13 – He baptized Margaret Sewid. November 18 – He went to Lampeter and baptized Evan, a son of Evan and Mary Thomas. November 23 – He went to Haverford-West sixty miles from Llanelly and spent the evening with Elizabeth and Mary Ann Couzzens and Bessie White. November 24 – He held a council meeting and preached twice and spent the evening with Bessie White and Mary Ann Couzzens, he slept in Mrs. Jenkins home. November 25 – He went to Sutton Mountains November 26 – Left Sutton Mountain for Haverford-West from there to Freystrop, preached at Brother William Bowen’s home – slept there. November 27 – Left Freystrop for Haverford-West spent a few hours and took the train for Llanelly. December 9 – He wrote a letter to Sister Bessie White. December 21 – He went to Freystrop – back to Haverford-West in the evening in company with Elizabeth Couzzens. December 22 – He held a meeting at Brother William White’s home December 23 – He went to Freystrop preached in the evening – slept at Brother William Bowen’s home. December 24 – Left Freystrop in company with Elizabeth Couzzens and spent the day at Haverford West. In the evening he took the train for Llanelly. December 25 – Christmas Day – He left Llanelly for Swansea and spent the evening with the Saints at a concert. January 21, 1868 – He baptized Elizabeth James. January 25 – He went to Pembrokeshire and spent the afternoon at Haverford West and went to Freystrop with Sister Elizabeth Couzzens. January 26 – He went to Haverford West with Brother William Bowen and the sisters Elizabeth and Mary Ann Couzzens – He attended council at Brother William White’s home. January 29 – He went in company with Elizabeth Couzzens to Canssonsen Village – preached near village. February 1 – He spent the day in Haverford West in company with Elizabeth Couzzens – went with William White to Neyland. February 2 – He went to Freystrop – preached at Brother William Bowen’s February 3 – He spent the day at Freystrop farm and remained there over night February 4 – He left Haverford West for Llanelly. February 21 – He took train from Llanelly to Johnston Station, and walked from there to Freystrop – and from there to Haverford West. February 22 – He went back to Freystrop and spent the day with Elizabeth Couzzens. February 23 – He was taken to the Station by William Bowen and Elizabeth Couzzens and went to Carmarthen town and then to Llanelly. February 24 – He went to Swansea in company with Nephi Pratt. March 15 – Swansea conference all the missionaries that labored in Wales at this time were present – John Parry – John D. Rees – Elias Morris – Barry Wride – Nephi Pratt – John S. Lewis – Richard J. Davis – He (Richard J. Davis) spoke at the 2:00 meeting at this conference. March 19 – He went to Van-Galch to visit a family that had considerable money asking them to assist the poor to emigrate. March 20 – Brother Owens gave me twenty pounds for tithing and twenty pounds to assist the poor to be paid back at Salt Lake City by the church – went to Carmarthen and posted the money to Liverpool to F.D. Richards and then went on to Llanelly. March 29 – He was in Haverford West preaching to the Saints there. March 30 – He went to Freystrop with Sister Bessie White – from there to Neyland New Milford and visited Patter in company with Brother and Sister White. March 31 – He went four miles up the river Milford to preach and came back on Brother Purser’s boat. April 1 – He went to Freystrop and spent the day with Elizabeth Couzzens. April 2 – Spent the day at Freystrop and Haverford West, and then took train for Llanelly Carmarthenshire. April 4 – He went to Swansea. April 23 – He visited Mr. Williams at Cefanpenmar, a sick man who belonged to the Church, there he met Julia, his cousin, she was the teacher of Mr. Williams’ children – she did not like Mormonism although he explained it to them. May 5-6 – He went out five miles in the country to see some brethren about money to be sent on to pay for teams and wagons which they would need at the railway terminus in U.S. – He collected from Brother Morgan seventy five pounds for a wagon and two yolk of oxen and seventy five pounds from Brother David Owens for the same purpose. May 7 – He sent to Llanelly and forwarded the money to F. D. Richards at Liverpool Office. May 14 – He received a letter from his brother William, from America concerning the money he owed him for his emigration from Wales to America in 1856 stating that he could not pay him. His brother William had turned against the Church and joined young Joseph. May 22 – He went to Pembrokeshire called at Freystorp farm Elizabeth Couzzens went with him to Haverford West where they went together to a ____ - the next day he spent in Haverford West and the evening in Freystrop. May 26 – He closed up the books of the conference at Llanelly. May 27 – He wrote letters, visited the Saints and at 9:00 o’clock in the evening John Parry came to see him with the news that he was to be at Liverpool Saturday May 30 to sail on the ship “John Bright” sailing from Liverpool to New York with a company of Saints June 4. May 29 – He left Llanelly at 2:00 o’clock May 30 – He took the train at Neath for Liverpool arrived at Mr. _______ 21 Hunter St. and stayed there all night. May 31 – He was at the Office in Liverpool in the fore noon – wrote a letter to the Millennial Star. June 1-2-3 – He was busy loading provisions on the ship “John Bright” for the voyage – and on the third he went to meet the two Couzzen sisters Elizabeth and Mary Ann who went on the ship with him. June 4 – Started down the river – he was very busy taking care of the provisions as he was one of the stewards. On board were seven hundred Saints well organized by F. D. Richards – fine weather and very little sickness – on the ninth day out Sister Frances Purser, from Pembrokeshire South Wales died at 6:00 o’clock A.M. and was buried in the deep in the afternoon of the same day. July 14 – Tuesday – landed at Castle Gardens – in the evening July 14 Brother Will Milard fell in the river and was drowned – moved same date to the railway station. July 15 – started the company on the R – R cars arrived at Albany 9:00 o’clock Thursday morning remaining there three hours. July 16 – After he and the company left Albany the weather was terribly hot and many people were sun struck – one sister died of the exceeding heat – at Omaha to Laramie Jul 23 8:00 PM. July 24 – He left the company camp and went to prepare for crossing the plains in Chester Loveland’s company. July 25 – They started form Little Laramie and arrived August 20, 1858 in Great Salt Lake City, Utah. Elizabeth and Mary Ann Couzzens travelled all the day way from Liverpool to Ogden Utah with him where they remain with their sister Letita Couzzens Wiliams arriving Aug. 22 and he went on to his home in Willard City the same day. This ended his mission. He found his family in good health but rather destitute of money and comforts. The end of August Apostle Lorenzo Snow invited him to attend the School of the Prophets at Brigham City once a week. September 5, 1868 – Elizabeth Couzzens, daughter of Moses Couzzens and Emily Miles Couzzens was sealed to him by marriage by President Daniel H. Wells in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. The record herein of the mission of Richard J. Davis was taken from his daily diary and important events only recorded, not sure of the spelling of the Welsh names. The family genealogy relation reference is to Emily Elizabeth Davis Schettler, which follows: Grandfather William David Jenkins born Ystrad-Tafody Parish Glamorganshire South Wales Great Grandfather David Jenkins born in Ystrad-Tafody Parish Glamorganshire South Wales Great-Great-Great Grandfather had two sons Edward and Jenkin, who came to the Ystrad-Tafody Parish Neath Valley, their father Thomas died at a farm named Pen-Keeg Ystrad Parish Glamorganshire and buried in the year 1776. Emily Elizabeth Davis Schettler’s father’s mother’s name was Margaret Davis born in Penderyn Parish Glamorganshire. (note under ggggrandfather reads Thomas Jenkins – sgh) Grand-mother – Great Grandfather - Richard Thomas born in Aberdare Parish Glamorganshire in the year of 1769 in the month of February. He married Gwenllian Edwards in 1793 she was twenty six years old. They were married in Aberdare Church. Margaret Jenkins oldest daughter of William David Jenkins had seven or eight children her husband was William Richard – two of the children were killed – the mother grieved so much it caused her death. Mary the second daughter married Robert ones a native of Flintshire North of Wales, they had eight children – their daughter Gwenllian was drowned – this was a very good family. Jane the third daughter married Evan Llewellan a native of Glamorganshire, they had four children – he died at the age about forty. William Davis, the uncle of Emily E. D. Schettler joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1849 in Ponty-Pridd Wales New Bridge and emigrated to the U.S. in 1856 intending to come to Utah but stopped in the States and joined the Josephites – he buried his first wife and married again at a place called Adel in the State of Iowa. November 1 – 1868. The first week of this month my father Richard J. Davis went to Malad Valley in Idaho and filed on a piece of land of 150 acres four miles south of Malad City and he named the place Willow Springs. In his home at Willard he made seats for the children and his wife Elizabeth taught them. May 17, 1869, Monday – My father went to Ogden to take part in the ceremonies of speaking the ground for the construction of the Utah Central Railroad. Present were Brigham Young and some of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. June 6, 1869 – Sunday – My aunts Martha Couzzens and Emily Couzzens visited my mother. June 14, 1869 – My father with six other men went to work on a dam to get water for irregation. July 5, 1869 – My father took my mother Elizabeth, his daughter Rebecca Jane, and son Richard Elias to Malad. November 14, 1869 – Willow Springs Branch near Malad City was organized – consisting of four villages. The organization took place in the home of Sister Morgan and my father Richard J. Davis was made President. January 2, 1870 – Sunday – My father attended a meeting at Brother David Bowen’s home, four miles south of Willow springs where he preached a sermon on free agency. April 12, 1870 – My father went to assist to remove a bullet from Morgan Morgan’s leg, who was shot by a man named Murphy, Morgan returned fire and killed Murphy. This happened in a session of the County Court in Malad City. April 25, 1870 – My father helping Moses Dudley to put up his house. May 5 – 1870 – My father took train at Ogden and came to Salt Lake to attend General Conference, May 6-7-8 – Friday-Saturday-Sunday. May 14 – Saturday – My father and his son William took up the remains of his wife’s Phoebe twins that had been temporarily buried in the garden and buried them in the new grave yard in Willard City. May 23 – 1870 – My father with his wife Elizabeth, my mother, and her sister Emily went to visit John Couzzens the husband of Martha Couzzens, my mother’s oldest sister at Montpelier, Idaho where my father preached to the Saints, they returned to Malad June 3. June 7, 1870 – President Brigham Young and company visited Malad City. July 4 – 1870 – My father was the orator of the 4th of July celebration in Cherry Creek in Malad Valley. October 5, 1870 – My father went to General Conference at Salt Lake City and stopped at Ogden on the way. October 29 – 1870 – My father attended meeting in Malad City, Apostle Lorenzo Snow was present. October 31, 1870 – My father started over the mountains to Cache Valley after a horse stollen by the Indians. The horse belonged to Martha Couzzens sister of my mother Elizabeth Davis. He got the horse and returned. My father was wise in dealing with the Indians and never had trouble with them. November 6, 1870 – Sunday – Daniel Lowe was made a Counsellor to my father in the Willow Springs Branch of the Church, in a meeting held at Sister Morgan’s. David Bowen was made President of the Teachers. December 1, 1870 – My father went to Call’s Fort and stayed to Sister Loveland’s. January 18, 1871 – My father went to Odgen City for lumber, window sashs and such for the Willow Springs School House. February 5, 1871 – My father attended a teacher’s meeting at Cherry Creek where some boys were put on trial for taking the name of the Lord in vain. March 4, 1871 – Saturday – 8:30 PM – Hyrum Davis, a son of my father and his wife Phoebe, was born at Willard City. March 16, 1871 – Bishop A. Fred Cardon died and was buried in Willard City grave yard. March 23, 1871 – My father’s son David died in Willard. He was his son by this wife Rebecca. Brother Joseph Dudley came to Willow Springs from Willard to tell my father. October 22, 1871 – This week my father worked on the School House at Willow Springs. December 3, 1871 – My father devoted the day seeing the people at Willow Springs about starting a day school. January 1, 1872 – The day school at Willow Springs was commenced. January 10, 1872 – Wednesday – My father attended a dance at Henderson Creek and because the dance was opened by prayer some Apostate Mormons, who here present were offended and left. January 28, 1872 – Sunday – My father took some elders with him and went to a settlement called Samaria and preached to the Saints. February 11, 1872 – Sunday – a meeting house at Willow Springs, which my father and four other brethren had built and finished was dedicated. Present – Bishop Daniel Daniels and many Elders and saints from surrounding branches. March 1 – 1872 – Friday – My father was at Willard and sowed wheat and attended a grand military ball in the evening. March 5, 1872 – My father received a letter from Willow Springs Malad Valley telling him of the birth on March 4 of a son to his wife Elizabeth Couzzens. March 7, 1872 – My father left Willard and went to Willow Springs arriving March 8 March 9, 1872 – My father blessed and named this child George Miles Davis. Elder David R. Jones assisted. March 24, 1872 – 12:00 o’clock midnight – George Miles Davis, child, died from result of un due exposure by the nurse at birth. March 28, 1872 – George Miles Davis was buried in Willard Grave Yard on March 26. My father with his wife Elizabeth and little son Moses drove in carriage from Willow Springs to Willard a distance of 50 miles with the body of this child April 15, 1872 – My father received a letter from President Joseph Young giving him instruction to organize the Seventies of Malad Valley in a mass quorum. May 1, 1872 – Wednesday – My father with his wife Rebecca and some of his children attended a May party of Willard City and the people of Box Elder County in the Utah Northern Railroad Junction. President Brigham Young, George A. Smith and Daniel H. Wells were present May 26, 1872 – Sunday – My father met with the Seventies of Malad Valley – according to previous arrangement and organized the mass quorum. June 10, 1872 – My father attended a teacher’s meeting in the Willard Springs meeting house. David R. Jones was brought before the teachers’ to answer to a complaint brought against him for abusing my father’s wife Elizabeth in connection with his family concerning day school where Elizabeth was a teacher. The teachers decided that David R. Jones and family were to apologize October 15, 1872 – My father was in Malad in convention to get up a ticket for the election for county officers. October 27, 1872 – My father started to Corrinne after freight for Montana. November 5, 1872 – My father attended the Election at Malad City. November 10, 1872 – Sunday – My father met at Bishop Hoskins at Oregon Springs and organized the Seventies in the Portage District and put John D. Cribbs in as President. My father preached to the brethren at 2:00 PM. November 14, 1872 – My father went to Ogden and paid Martha Couzzens $200.00 for some cows he had bought from her, - the same day he bought two stoves. December 30, 1872 – My father devoted this day arranging a dance to get money to assist Apostle Lorenzo Snow to make his mission around the world. January 5, 1873 – At a meeting at Willow Springs my father reports in his diary that Hannah Morgans was disfellowshipped for unchristianlike conduct. January 24, 1873 – 3:10 AM – I was born in Willow Springs, - my father Richard J. Davis my mother Elizabeth Couzzens Davis. Blessed Sunday February 23, 1873 at the 2:00 PM meeting in Willow Springs meeting in Willow Springs meeting house my Moses Dudley. February 1, 1873 – Saturday – My father attended a meeting in the Willow Spings School House pertaining to a grist mill and a corporation sheep herd at 2:00 PM – the same day he organized a quorum of Elders in the Willow Springs Branch. February 9, 1873 – My father was in Samaria where he lead in the Priesthood meeting on the subject of a cooperation grist mill and sheep herd. February 20, 1873 – Thursday – My father was in Malad City with some other Brethren and was appointed with other Brethren to buy the grist mill. February 21, 1873 – Friday – Bishop Daniel Daniels, Bishop _. _. __________, James Thomas, John Lusk and my father bought the grist mill of Mr. John Nelson for the company of the brethren. March 20, 1873 – My father blessed Nathan Hunting’s child at his home and named her Adaline. October 25, 1874 – My father ordained the following Seventies Simeon Peabody Richard Morse Thomas Roberts May 11, 1875 – My father’s son Evan John by his wife Phoebe was drowned in a creek near Malad City – was taken to Willard City and buried in the family lot. April 23, 1876 – My father ordained his son William a Seventy in the 59th Quorum. October 5, 1892 – My father Richard J. Davis died at Willow Springs Oneida Co., Idaho and was buried in Willard City Cemetry. November 11, 1883 – My father Richard J. Davis was set apart as First President of the 52nd Quorum of Seventy in Malad Valley. June 19, 1887 – My father and my mother Elizabeth Couzzens had their second endowments in the Logan Temple. April 12, 1884 – My father attended a meeting of the 52nd Quorum of Seventy. He helped to ordain 28 members into the Quorum one of whom was a Lamanite, he remained in Portage until Sunday the next day April 13 and attended a meeting at 10:00 AM. He went from Washaki to his home on Monday April 14. On Sunday at 2:00 PM he attended a meeting and helped to ordain three Seventy two of whom were Lamanities.

Find a Grave - Richard Jenkins Davis

Colaborador: BarbaraLeishman Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Richard Jenkins Davis, son of William Jenkins and Gwenllian Thomas Davis, was born in Ystradyfodog Parish, Glamorganshire, South Wales on September 3, 1826. His father died when Richard was very young. He lived with his grandfather, Richard Thomas, doing farm work. Later he worked in the coal mine. While working in the mine at Llantwit Vardre Parish, he met and married Rebecca Morgan on July 22, 1849. Rebecca Morgan was born June 30, 1828, at Llantwit Vardre, Glamorganshire, South Wales to Lewis and Margaret Phillips Morgan..... In November 1868 he went to Malad Valley, entered 160 acres of land, built a log house and then returned to Willard for the winter. In the spring of 1869 in company with Moses Dudley and John D. Jones, each taking part of their families and their cattle, sheep, pigs and chickens, they started out to build up new homes in the Malad Valley. With him was his wife, Elizabeth Cozzens (Cousins), whom he had married on September 5, 1868, and sons William M., Rochard E., and daughter, Margaret. His son, Richard, who was nine at the time, had a clear memory of that April morning when they landed on a desolate sagebrush flat to live in a log house with neither roof nor floor, and very little to interest them but rattlesnakes, coyotes, and wolves. Now for the reason this history is in this booklet. Richard and Rebecca had seven children born in Willard. Margaret Ellen was born December 10, 1854; Rebecca Jane on July 31, 1856; Ann Gwenthlyn on January 24, 1858; Richard Elias on October 6, 1859; Mary Elizabeth on September 15, 1861; Thomas Henry on January 21, 1862; and David Jenkins on May9, 1865. Six children grew to maturity and married; two died as young children. There is no death date for Mary Elizabeth, but it is believed she died before eight years of age. This would put her death in the time frame of burials in the old Pioneer cemetery and before the new cemetery was started. David Jenkins died at the age of six on March 23, 1871. He is buried in the new cemetery (Ward 3, Block 2, Lot 2, Grave 5). There is a stone with no death date for Mary Elizabeth on Grave 7 of that lot, so she might be a "transplant" from the old cemetery. Richard took a fourth wife in polygamy on November 3, 1886, when he married Martha Ellen Davis. Richard passed away October 5, 1892, at Malad, Oneida, Idaho, and is buried in the new cemetery at Willard, Utah. Rebecca Morgan Davis passed away on April 5, 1896, at Willard and is also buried in the new cemetery. She did a great deal of good. Her last two years were of much suffering, but she always clung to the great work of the Lord. -------- Son of William Davis Jenkins (1800-1842) and Gwendin Thomas (1802-1863) Married Rebecca Morgan Jul 22 1849 in Llantwit Fardre Galmorgan Wales. Sealed Jun 1 1939 in the Logan Temple. children of Martha Ellen Davis May (1867 - 1922) & George May dau: *Lavenia May Hillstrom (1890-1966) son: Alice Marvel May Johnson (1897-1944) son: *Merlin G May (1901-1914) dau: *Zelma May Frodsham (1904-1960) son: Byron Wayne May (1905-1985) son: Stanley Arthur May (1909-1975) Family links: Spouses: Catherine Mnu Davis (1824 - ____) Rebecca Morgan Davis (1828 - 1896) Phoebe Jones (1841 - 1912) Elizabeth Cozzens Davis (1849 - 1905) Martha Ellen Davis May (1867 - 1922) Children: William Morgan Davis (1850 - 1916)* Rebecca Jane Davis Hubbard (1856 - 1890)* Ann Gwenthlyn Davis Baird (1858 - 1920)* Richard Elias Davis (1859 - 1941)* Mary Elizabeth Davis (1861 - 1869)* Thomas Henry Davis (1863 - 1934)* David Jenkins Davis (1865 - 1871)* Robert Cozzens Davis (1869 - 1946)* George Miles Davis (1871 - 1871)* Emily Elizabeth Davis Schettler (1873 - 1967)* Edward Harvey Davis (1874 - 1941)* Mary Ann Davis Hyde (1876 - 1931)* John Charles Davis (1878 - 1951)* Joseph Davis (1880 - 1909)* Martha Davis (1891 - 1891)* *Calculated relationship Burial: Willard Precinct Cemetery Willard Box Elder County Utah, USA Plot: Lot 2, Block 2, Ward 3 Maintained by: Redriver Originally Created by: Ray Memmott (inactive) Record added: Sep 03, 2009 Find A Grave Memorial# 41525581 findagrave.com

Life timeline of Richard J. Davis

1826
Richard J. Davis was born on 3 Sep 1826
Richard J. Davis was 5 years old when Charles Darwin embarks on his journey aboard HMS Beagle, during which he will begin to formulate his theory of evolution. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
1831
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Richard J. Davis was 14 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
1840
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Richard J. Davis was 33 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
1859
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Richard J. Davis was 34 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
1860
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Richard J. Davis was 51 years old when Thomas Edison announces his invention of the phonograph, a machine that can record and play sound. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
1877
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Richard J. Davis was 59 years old when Louis Pasteur successfully tests his vaccine against rabies on Joseph Meister, a boy who was bitten by a rabid dog. Louis Pasteur was a French biologist, microbiologist and chemist renowned for his discoveries of the principles of vaccination, microbial fermentation and pasteurization. He is remembered for his remarkable breakthroughs in the causes and prevention of diseases, and his discoveries have saved many lives ever since. He reduced mortality from puerperal fever, and created the first vaccines for rabies and anthrax. His medical discoveries provided direct support for the germ theory of disease and its application in clinical medicine. He is best known to the general public for his invention of the technique of treating milk and wine to stop bacterial contamination, a process now called pasteurization. He is regarded as one of the three main founders of bacteriology, together with Ferdinand Cohn and Robert Koch, and is popularly known as the "father of microbiology".
1885
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Richard J. Davis died on 5 Oct 1892 at the age of 66
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Richard J. Davis (3 Sep 1826 - 5 Oct 1892), BillionGraves Record 5113036 Willard, Box Elder, Utah, United States

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