Samuel Newbold

2 Aug 1850 - 30 Aug 1936

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Samuel Newbold

2 Aug 1850 - 30 Aug 1936
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John Newbold was born 17 May, 1821 in Castle Donington, Leicestershire, England. He died 15 August, 1888, in Smithfield Cache, Utah. Parents: Samuel Newbold (1797-1839), Sarah Watts (1798-1882) Siblings: Israel (1817), Mary Ann (1822), William (1824), Thomas (1826), Sarah (1835), Mary Ann (1837). Ma
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Life Information

Samuel Newbold

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Smithfield City Cemetery

376-424 E Center St
Smithfield, Cache, Utah
United States
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btucker71

May 22, 2012
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doclouie

May 3, 2012

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John, Newbold

Colaborador: btucker71 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

John Newbold was born 17 May, 1821 in Castle Donington, Leicestershire, England. He died 15 August, 1888, in Smithfield Cache, Utah. Parents: Samuel Newbold (1797-1839), Sarah Watts (1798-1882) Siblings: Israel (1817), Mary Ann (1822), William (1824), Thomas (1826), Sarah (1835), Mary Ann (1837). Marriage: Elizabeth Dakin, 29 October 1837, Castle Donington, Leicestershire, England. After marriage, the Newbold family lived in Castle Donington for 19 years and the family increased by 14. Only 7 of these children lived to adulthood. The family moved to Breaston (1861 census). Breaston is a large village about 8 miles east of Derby. Here 4 more children were added to the family, all of which lived. They found work at Draycott so moved there. In 1842, a lace factory was erected there. Forty machines were worked and prior to 1856, a doubling shed was added which employed three times the number as before. According to the 1871 census, John (age 50) worked as a cotton corder. He also made silk lace and stockings at home. He was an artist at the trade. Two of his children were working as cotton doublers, in this mill the famous Nottingham curtains were made. They had to be 13 years old to work. Two girls Hannah and Mary earned 1.75 a week or 7 shillings in English money.They went to work early in the morning and returned late at night. These two girls took care of 360 spindles. It was hard to do, but when the thread broke, they had to tie it or all went wrong. Their boss soon learned that he could depend on them and raised their wages to 3 shillings. They won many prizes for efficiency in their work. Draycott, was called "The Green." It was uphill all the way to Draycott and was beautiful. Grandfather and Grandmother lived at the top of the hill and always kept cakes and candy to give we grandchildren. The Newbold family were all good singers and had a choir of their own. When young, they went to singing practice and carroling in England with Arthur B. Taylor. When Mother and Father had the opportunity to hear The Latter Day Saint Missionaries, they formed warm friends with them and attended their meetings. Very soon they were studying the Scriptures, and proving for themselves, the teachings of the very unpopular religion and soon they applied for Baptism. They were baptized and entered upon a new life. They were all faithful Latter Day Saints and were taught to pay their tithing and read the Bible. They liked Isaiah, which told of a machine that would be in the air, in our day but not in theirs. The parents began saving money to come to Utah. They were all united and worked hard and at all times listened to the council and advice of the Elders, and their home was always open to them. Many times wonderful manifestations and blessings came to them in every deed. In 1873, they bid good bye for a little while, to two of their brothers who came with some Missionaries to America. (Joseph and Samuel) and in 1874, the rest of the family (except one sister Harriet) left England, the land of their birth, to cross the ocean and come to a new country and begin a new life. Harriet and Hannah, (Ellen Nelsons Mother) were beautiful singers. Never did see Harriet again, who married and raised a family and died in England. They all had a wonderful time on the boat coming to America. We were all happy thinking of the privilege that was ours to come to Zion. They sang the songs that the Elders had taught them. Learned to dance, and loved to hear the Elders who had entertained them in their home in England. (they explained the Gospel to them.) We rejoiced for the privilege of living in this day and praised God for his love. We had many friends in England, but when we joined the church, they turned their backs on us and shunned us. Many were the hardships we endured, coming to Utah. The journey was long, tedious and many times tiresome. We landed in Farmington, Davis, Utah on 4 Nov. 1874. Hannah remained in Jersey city, New Jersey with her children. Most of the family found work in various ways. It was a different climate and customs were all new and hard to adjust to. Mother Elizabeth was not contented. The mountains were high and rugged looking and she was afraid they would fall down and kill everyone. They lived in Farmington for several years, then a terrible wind storm came and that was enough. They came to Smithfield in 1875. The remainder of their lives was spent there. Father John died 15 Aug. 1888 after lightening struck and killed him. Mother Elizabeth died 17 May, 1907. They are buried in Smithfield, Cache, Utah. Taken from family histories.

Elizabeth Dakin

Colaborador: btucker71 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Elizabeth Dakin was born 30 Dec. 1820 in Castle Donnington, Leicestershire, England. Parents: Nathaniel Dakin (1798-1871), Hannah Newbold, (1797-1857) Married John Newbold, 29 October 1837, Castle Donnington, Leicestershire, England. Children: Israel (1838), George Orvill (1839, Selina (1841), James (1842), Harriet (1843), twins Fanny, Henry (1844), Hannah (1845), Fanny (1847), Samuel (1848), Emma (1849), Samuel (1850), Mary (1852), Clara (1854), Sarahan (1856), Joseph (1858), Hyrum (1860), Elizabeth Ann (1863). Elizabeth was married to John Newbold who was 16 and she was 17 years old. 1841 Census: age 20 living in Castle Donnington. Elizabeth was happy to join the Church and was baptized 14 Mar. 1846 and John was baptized 2 years later. When the new Lace factory opened at Draycott, they moved there for work. Her husband and daughters got work there in 1842, she would fix lunches each day for John to carry to work for them. John was a talented lace maker and could make stockings. She would make lace shawls on frames, at her home while caring for the children. She loved to hear the Elders teach them the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Three of their children married: Harriett 25 December 1863- stayed in England with her family. Hannah 25 December 1863- came to America with her family (no records) George Orvill June 1864- came to America with his family (no records) On October 22nd 1873, the bid goodbye to two of their sons, Samuel (age 23) and Joseph (age 16) who sailed to New York on the ship "Nevada." with some Missionaries who were returning home. In 1874 the rest of the family left England to make the trip to America. The "Wyoming" sailed from Liverpool on 14 October 1874. The ship registry lists: John Newbold age 53 Elizabeth Newbold age 53 Mary Newbold age 23 Clara Newbold age 21 Hyrum Newbold age 11 Elizabeth Newbold age 8 The ledger lists a cash payment of 13 lbs. 14 schillings, and the remaining 50 lb. 5 schillings was paid by the Perpetual Emigration Fund. Each adult was charged 12 lbs 16 schillings, and each child was charged 6 lbs. 8 schillings. The channel was rough, causing many to be seasick. The next day, after leaving Queenstown, there was a severe storm that lasted for three days. All on board were seasick, but after the storm the weather was beautiful until they arrived at port. The Newbold family had a wonderful time on the boat coming to America. They arrived at Castle Garden on 27, Oct, 1874 where they were quarantined from 2-5 p.m. Elizabeth died: 18 May 1907 (age 87) and is buried in Smithfield Utah. Compiled from family records by Sharen Leishman Munk

Farmer Dies After Mishap-Andrew Newbold

Colaborador: btucker71 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

DOWNEY RANCHER SUFFERS BROKEN NECK IN HAYING ACCIDENT- POCATELLO, Idaho- Andrew J. Newbold, 44, a rancher of Downey, died Thursday at the Pocatello general hospital of a broken neck, suffered Tuesday when he was struck by a boom on the hay derrick at Downey. Mr. Newbold was standing on the top of the stack and was about to trip a sling load of hay when the chain anchoring the boom to the base parted. The heavy boom stuck Mr. Newbold on the shoulder close to the neck. He was paralyzed from the shoulders down. Mr. Newbold, a native of Springville, Utah, came to Idaho with his parents in 1892. He was born March 28, 1890. His widow, Mrs. Carrie Rasmussen Newbold, survives, and five sons and daughters: Murland, Floyd, Unis, Phyllis and Ottis Newbold, Downey; his father, Samuel Newbold, Downey; and two brothers, Davis Newbold, Springville, and LaVon Newbold, Downey. The Hall mortuary is in charge of funeral services.

Funeral Services of Samuel Newbold

Colaborador: btucker71 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Samuel Newbold Born 1850 Castle Donnington, England Death 1936 in Downey, Bannock, Idaho Trio "Beautiful Home" Ruth Penrose, Verna Dewey and Gelennis Barnes Prayer-Fred Penrose Duet "Sometime, Somewhere" Ona Whitaker and Anita Penrose 1st Speaker Joseph A Brim 2nd Speaker W A Dewey 3rd Speaker W. O Thompson Vocal Sole " In The Garden of Somewhere" Lucille Newbold 4th Speaker President G T Hyde Closing Remarks Bishop Williw Brim Closing Prayer Closing song" Shall We Meet" Ruth Penrose, Venna Dewey and Glennis Barnes Grave Dedicated Jake Watson

Samuel Newbold A Pioneer

Colaborador: btucker71 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Samuel Newbold (KWNN-GF5) 1850-1936 There is not many stories written about Samuel Newbold. Ezra L Newbold, son of Samuel writes about his father in his life story.There is one short “Life Story by Samuel Newbold”. I spoke with my father, Ronald H Newbold, Samuel’s grandson. Ronald is the only living person who personally knew Samuel. Ronald’s parents and brothers lived with Samuel, after the death of Samuel’s second wife. Putting several parts of stories together, helps us learn who Samuel Newbold is. Samuel Newbold was born in 1850 in Castle Donnington, England to John and Elizabeth Dakin Newbold. John and Elizabeth had 14 children, eight children died in infancy or early childhood. Samuel was named after a brother named Samuel who died an infant two years prior. Samuel had four brothers and four sisters who lived to be adults. Joining the Latter- Day Saints John and Elizabeth and their family were pioneers in several ways. They can be pioneers by the first along with their children to join the Church. They can be called pioneers. When Mother and Father had the opportunity to hear The Latter Day Saint Missionaries, they formed warm friends with them and attended their meetings. Very soon they were studying the Scriptures, and proving for themselves, the teachings of the very unpopular religion and soon they applied for Baptism. They were baptized and entered upon a new life. They were all faithful Latter Day Saints and were taught to pay their tithing and read the Bible. The Newbold’s had many friends in England, but after joining the Church many of them turned their backs on them. Samuel and His Brothers were Pioneers After joining the Church John and Elizabeth began saving money to come to Utah. They were all united and worked hard. The family listened to the council and advice of the Elders, and their home was always open to them. In 1873, Joseph, Samuel’s younger brother and Samuel left for Utah with some Missionaries who were returning to America. They sailed to America on the ship Idaho. It was difficult to say their good byes for a little while. Samuel was 23 and Joseph was 15 years of age. Samuel’s two older brothers Israel and George came to America in the 1873. The four brothers were the pioneers of the family. In 1874, the rest of the family, except one sister Harriet, left England, the land of their birth to cross the ocean and come to a new country and begin a new life. Once in Utah both Joseph and Samuel worked for a farmer sending their money to their parents in England. George found work on the railroads and Israel found work as a Mason. When the Newbold’s left for Utah in 1874 they sailed by ship. They left Liverpool, England traveled by ship named the “The Wyoming” crossing the Atlantic Ocean. Seven days later, the family arrived in Castle Gardens. When landing in America, they board a train to Utah. By the time the Newbold’s came railroad was complete and Saints wanting to come to Utah did not have to cross the plains in a cover wagon or pull a handcart. However the Newbold had hardships coming to Utah. The journey was long, tedious and many times tiresome. They settled in Farmington, Davis, Utah on 4 Nov. 1874. Most of the family found work in various ways. It was a different climate and customs were all new and hard to adjust to. Samuel became a farmer. Samuel died as a farmer. Source: Contributed By sharenleishmanmunk1 · 17 September 2014 Living in the Big House with Grandpa Samuel I asked my father, Ronald Newbold to tell me about, Grandpa Samuel Newbold this what he shared with me. “Samuel was not a very tall man and had a beard. I don’t remember my grandfather ever cutting his beard.” Grandpa was a farmer, even in his old age, he found chores around the farm. My parents, Ezra and Dessie Newbold, my two brothers and myself lived with Grandpa Samuel in Bannock, Idaho farm. After Samuel’s second wife Isabell Lowe passed my father bought the farm from Grandpa and moved in with him. Grandpa’s house was a big house with each room serving a multi-purpose. ”There was a kitchen/ my parents’ bedroom, the living room/ bedroom for my brothers, Dwane, Jesse and myself and the bedroom was for Grandpa Samuel. I called it big, because it was bigger than a one room log cabin. You are right we did not have a bathroom, we had the fine privilege of having a two seater outhouse.” Samuel served for 34 years as Ward Clerk Grandpa was the ward clerk for 34 years in the Downey, Idaho Ward. Samuel served under 5 Bishops. He also served as various secretary. Ezra L Newbold, son wrote in his life story about his father. “My parents told us Samuel was ward clerk in Smithfield, Utah. When they moved to Downey, Idaho he (Samuel) was Ward Clerk, and various secretaries. I can remember when he had all the ward records at home. He spent a lot of his time keeping the records in order for the wards.” Remember there was no computers and most of the records were done by hand. Grandpa Samuel wrote about himself” At the time of this writing I am 79 years old. I have kept the Word of wisdom all of my life and never remember taking the Lord’s name in vain. I have never used tobacco in any form and never in anyway used intoxicating drinks. I have had good health all of my life”. Samuel became ill 2 weeks before his death. Samuel Newbold passed away in 1936, at the age of 86 years old in Cambridge, Bannock, Idaho, in his home. •Note Ezra L Newbold son of Samuel and Lucy Olney Newbold served as a ward clerk in the Long Beach Ward, in California. Ronald Newbold, grandson served as stake executive in the Norwalk Stake, California. By compiled by Marlene Newbold Clark, great-granddaughter of Samuel Newbold Living in the Big House with Grandpa Samuel I asked my father, Ronald Newbold to tell me about, Grandpa Samuel Newbold this what he shared with me. “Samuel was not a very tall man and had a beard. I don’t remember my grandfather ever cutting his beard.” Grandpa was a farmer, even in his old age, he found chores around the farm. My parents, Ezra and Dessie Newbold, my two brothers and myself lived with Grandpa Samuel in Bannock, Idaho farm. After Samuel’s second wife Isabell Lowe passed my father bought the farm from Grandpa and moved in with him. Grandpa’s house was a big house with each room serving a multi-purpose. ”There was a kitchen/ my parents’ bedroom, the living room/ bedroom for my brothers, Dwane, Jesse and myself and the bedroom was for Grandpa Samuel. I called it big, because it was bigger than a one room log cabin. You are right we did not have a bathroom, we had the fine privilege of having a two seater outhouse.” Samuel served for 34 years as Ward Clerk Grandpa was the ward clerk for 34 years in the Downey, Idaho Ward. Samuel served under 5 Bishops. He also served as various secretary. Ezra L Newbold, son wrote in his life story about his father. “My parents told us Samuel was ward clerk in Smithfield, Utah. When they moved to Downey, Idaho he (Samuel) was Ward Clerk, and various secretaries. I can remember when he had all the ward records at home. He spent a lot of his time keeping the records in order for the wards.” Remember there was no computers and most of the records were done by hand. Grandpa Samuel wrote about himself” At the time of this writing I am 79 years old. I have kept the Word of wisdom all of my life and never remember taking the Lord’s name in vain. I have never used tobacco in any form and never in anyway used intoxicating drinks. I have had good health all of my life”. Samuel became ill 2 weeks before his death. Samuel Newbold passed away in 1936, at the age of 86 years old in Cambridge, Bannock, Idaho, in his home. •Note Ezra L Newbold son of Samuel and Lucy Olney Newbold served as a ward clerk in the Long Beach Ward, in California. Ronald Newbold, grandson served as stake executive in the Norwalk Stake, California. Samuel Newbold (KWNN-GF5) 1850-1936 There is not many stories written about Samuel Newbold. Ezra L Newbold, son of Samuel writes about his father in his life story. I one short “Life Story by Samuel Newbold”. I spoke with my father, Ronald H Newbold, Samuel’s grandson. Ronald is the only living person who personally knew Samuel. Ronald’s parents and brothers lived with Samuel, after the death of Samuel’s second wife. Putting several parts of stories together, helps us learn who Samuel Newbold is. Samuel Newbold was born in 1850 in Castle Donnington, England to John and Elizabeth Dakin Newbold. John and Elizabeth had 14 children, eight children died in infancy or early childhood. Samuel was named after a brother named Samuel who died an infant two years prior. Samuel had four brothers and four sisters who lived to be adults. Joining the Latter- Day Saints John and Elizabeth and their family were pioneers in several ways. They can be pioneers by the first along with their children to join the Church. They can be called pioneers. When Mother and Father had the opportunity to hear The Latter Day Saint Missionaries, they formed warm friends with them and attended their meetings. Very soon they were studying the Scriptures, and proving for themselves, the teachings of the very unpopular religion and soon they applied for Baptism. They were baptized and entered upon a new life. They were all faithful Latter Day Saints and were taught to pay their tithing and read the Bible. The Newbold’s had many friends in England, but after joining the Church many of them turned their backs on them. Samuel and His Brothers were Pioneers After joining the Church John and Elizabeth began saving money to come to Utah. They were all united and worked hard. The family listened to the council and advice of the Elders, and their home was always open to them. In 1873, Joseph, Samuel’s younger brother and Samuel left for Utah with some Missionaries who were returning to America. They sailed to America on the ship Idaho. It was difficult to say their good byes for a little while. Samuel was 23 and Joseph was 15 years of age. Samuel’s two older brothers Israel and George came to America in the 1873. The four brothers were the pioneers of the family. In 1874, the rest of the family, except one sister Harriet, left England, the land of their birth to cross the ocean and come to a new country and begin a new life. Once in Utah both Joseph and Samuel worked for a farmer sending their money to their parents in England. George found work on the railroads and Israel found work as a Mason. When the Newbold’s left for Utah in 1874 they sailed by ship. They left Liverpool, England traveled by ship named the “The Wyoming” crossing the Atlantic Ocean. Seven days later, the family arrived in Castle Gardens. When landing in America, they board a train to Utah. By the time the Newbold’s came railroad was complete and Saints wanting to come to Utah did not have to cross the plains in a cover wagon or pull a handcart. However the Newbold had hardships coming to Utah. The journey was long, tedious and many times tiresome. They settled in Farmington, Davis, Utah on 4 Nov. 1874. Most of the family found work in various ways. It was a different climate and customs were all new and hard to adjust to. Samuel became a farmer. Samuel died as a farmer. Source: Contributed By sharenleishmanmunk1 · 17 September 2014 Living in the Big House with Grandpa Samuel I asked my father, Ronald Newbold to tell me about, Grandpa Samuel Newbold this what he shared with me. “Samuel was not a very tall man and had a beard. I don’t remember my grandfather ever cutting his beard.” Grandpa was a farmer, even in his old age, he found chores around the farm. My parents, Ezra and Dessie Newbold, my two brothers and myself lived with Grandpa Samuel in Bannock, Idaho farm. After Samuel’s second wife Isabell Lowe passed my father bought the farm from Grandpa and moved in with him. Grandpa’s house was a big house with each room serving a multi-purpose. ”There was a kitchen/ my parents’ bedroom, the living room/ bedroom for my brothers, Dwane, Jesse and myself and the bedroom was for Grandpa Samuel. I called it big, because it was bigger than a one room log cabin. You are right we did not have a bathroom, we had the fine privilege of having a two seater outhouse.” Samuel served for 34 years as Ward Clerk Grandpa was the ward clerk for 34 years in the Downey, Idaho Ward. Samuel served under 5 Bishops. He also served as various secretary. Ezra L Newbold, son wrote in his life story about his father. “My parents told us Samuel was ward clerk in Smithfield, Utah. When they moved to Downey, Idaho he (Samuel) was Ward Clerk, and various secretaries. I can remember when he had all the ward records at home. He spent a lot of his time keeping the records in order for the wards.” Remember there was no computers and most of the records were done by hand. Grandpa Samuel wrote about himself” At the time of this writing I am 79 years old. I have kept the Word of wisdom all of my life and never remember taking the Lord’s name in vain. I have never used tobacco in any form and never in anyway used intoxicating drinks. I have had good health all of my life”. Samuel became ill 2 weeks before his death. Samuel Newbold passed away in 1936, at the age of 86 years old in Cambridge, Bannock, Idaho, in his home. •Note Ezra L Newbold son of Samuel and Lucy Olney Newbold served as a ward clerk in the Long Beach Ward, in California. Ronald Newbold, grandson served as stake executive in the Norwalk Stake, California. Samuel Newbold (KWNN-GF5) 1850-1936 There is not many stories written about Samuel Newbold. Ezra L Newbold, son of Samuel writes about his father in his life story. I one short “Life Story by Samuel Newbold”. I spoke with my father, Ronald H Newbold, Samuel’s grandson. Ronald is the only living person who personally knew Samuel. Ronald’s parents and brothers lived with Samuel, after the death of Samuel’s second wife. Putting several parts of stories together, helps us learn who Samuel Newbold is. Samuel Newbold was born in 1850 in Castle Donnington, England to John and Elizabeth Dakin Newbold. John and Elizabeth had 14 children, eight children died in infancy or early childhood. Samuel was named after a brother named Samuel who died an infant two years prior. Samuel had four brothers and four sisters who lived to be adults. Joining the Latter- Day Saints John and Elizabeth and their family were pioneers in several ways. They can be pioneers by the first along with their children to join the Church. They can be called pioneers. When Mother and Father had the opportunity to hear The Latter Day Saint Missionaries, they formed warm friends with them and attended their meetings. Very soon they were studying the Scriptures, and proving for themselves, the teachings of the very unpopular religion and soon they applied for Baptism. They were baptized and entered upon a new life. They were all faithful Latter Day Saints and were taught to pay their tithing and read the Bible. The Newbold’s had many friends in England, but after joining the Church many of them turned their backs on them. Samuel and His Brothers were Pioneers After joining the Church John and Elizabeth began saving money to come to Utah. They were all united and worked hard. The family listened to the council and advice of the Elders, and their home was always open to them. In 1873, Joseph, Samuel’s younger brother and Samuel left for Utah with some Missionaries who were returning to America. They sailed to America on the ship Idaho. It was difficult to say their good byes for a little while. Samuel was 23 and Joseph was 15 years of age. Samuel’s two older brothers Israel and George came to America in the 1873. The four brothers were the pioneers of the family. In 1874, the rest of the family, except one sister Harriet, left England, the land of their birth to cross the ocean and come to a new country and begin a new life. Once in Utah both Joseph and Samuel worked for a farmer sending their money to their parents in England. George found work on the railroads and Israel found work as a Mason. When the Newbold’s left for Utah in 1874 they sailed by ship. They left Liverpool, England traveled by ship named the “The Wyoming” crossing the Atlantic Ocean. Seven days later, the family arrived in Castle Gardens. When landing in America, they board a train to Utah. By the time the Newbold’s came railroad was complete and Saints wanting to come to Utah did not have to cross the plains in a cover wagon or pull a handcart. However the Newbold had hardships coming to Utah. The journey was long, tedious and many times tiresome. They settled in Farmington, Davis, Utah on 4 Nov. 1874. Most of the family found work in various ways. It was a different climate and customs were all new and hard to adjust to. Samuel became a farmer. Samuel died as a farmer. Source: Contributed By sharenleishmanmunk1 · 17 September 2014 Living in the Big House with Grandpa Samuel I asked my father, Ronald Newbold to tell me about, Grandpa Samuel Newbold this what he shared with me. “Samuel was not a very tall man and had a beard. I don’t remember my grandfather ever cutting his beard.” Grandpa was a farmer, even in his old age, he found chores around the farm. My parents, Ezra and Dessie Newbold, my two brothers and myself lived with Grandpa Samuel in Bannock, Idaho farm. After Samuel’s second wife Isabell Lowe passed my father bought the farm from Grandpa and moved in with him. Grandpa’s house was a big house with each room serving a multi-purpose. ”There was a kitchen/ my parents’ bedroom, the living room/ bedroom for my brothers, Dwane, Jesse and myself and the bedroom was for Grandpa Samuel. I called it big, because it was bigger than a one room log cabin. You are right we did not have a bathroom, we had the fine privilege of having a two seater outhouse.” Samuel served for 34 years as Ward Clerk Grandpa was the ward clerk for 34 years in the Downey, Idaho Ward. Samuel served under 5 Bishops. He also served as various secretary. Ezra L Newbold, son wrote in his life story about his father. “My parents told us Samuel was ward clerk in Smithfield, Utah. When they moved to Downey, Idaho he (Samuel) was Ward Clerk, and various secretaries. I can remember when he had all the ward records at home. He spent a lot of his time keeping the records in order for the wards.” Remember there was no computers and most of the records were done by hand. Grandpa Samuel wrote about himself” At the time of this writing I am 79 years old. I have kept the Word of wisdom all of my life and never remember taking the Lord’s name in vain. I have never used tobacco in any form and never in anyway used intoxicating drinks. I have had good health all of my life”. Samuel became ill 2 weeks before his death. Samuel Newbold passed away in 1936, at the age of 86 years old in Cambridge, Bannock, Idaho, in his home. •Note Ezra L Newbold son of Samuel and Lucy Olney Newbold served as a ward clerk in the Long Beach Ward, in California. Ronald Newbold, grandson served as stake executive in the Norwalk Stake, California.

Joseph and Samuel Newbold Sail to America 1837

Colaborador: btucker71 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Joseph and Samuel Newbold sailed to American on October 22, 1873 on the Idaho. They arrived in New York on November 4 1873 with the J Hart Company. The Guion liner Idaho transported 3,057 Latter-Day Saints in 6 emigrant voyages between Liverpool, England and New York. These companies ranged in size from 150 to 806. The first passage began on September 7, 1870 with Frank H Hyde in charge of the emigrants. Captain james Price commanding the vessel and the last one was on 17 October 1877. During the voyage origination on June 24, 1874 the vessel encountered a terrific storm. Captain William Forsyth, who brought 14 Mormon companies across the Atlantic 5 vessels, commented that there were too many Mormons on board for the ship to be harmed. He also added, according to the church record that fro 18 years he carried companies and had never heard of a vessel carrying Mormons being lost.

Life timeline of Samuel Newbold

1850
Samuel Newbold was born on 2 Aug 1850
Samuel Newbold was 19 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Samuel Newbold was 24 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Samuel Newbold was 33 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
Samuel Newbold was 44 years old when Mahatma Gandhi forms the Natal Indian Congress (NIC) in order to fight discrimination against Indian traders in Natal. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian activist who was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā – applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa – is now used worldwide. In India, he is also called Bapu and Gandhi ji, and known as the Father of the Nation.
Samuel Newbold was 55 years old when Albert Einstein publishes his first paper on the special theory of relativity. Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. He is best known to the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2, which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation". He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect", a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.
Samuel Newbold was 62 years old when The British passenger liner RMS Titanic sinks in the North Atlantic at 2:20 a.m., two hours and forty minutes after hitting an iceberg. Only 710 of 2,227 passengers and crew on board survive. RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early hours of 15 April 1912, after colliding with an iceberg during its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. There were an estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, and more than 1,500 died, making it one of the deadliest commercial peacetime maritime disasters in modern history. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time it entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. It was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast. Thomas Andrews, her architect, died in the disaster.
Samuel Newbold was 79 years old when Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio. George Herman "Babe" Ruth Jr. was an American professional baseball player whose career in Major League Baseball (MLB) spanned 22 seasons, from 1914 through 1935. Nicknamed "The Bambino" and "The Sultan of Swat", he began his MLB career as a stellar left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, but achieved his greatest fame as a slugging outfielder for the New York Yankees. Ruth established many MLB batting records, including career home runs (714), runs batted in (RBIs) (2,213), bases on balls (2,062), slugging percentage (.690), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164); the latter two still stand as of 2018. Ruth is regarded as one of the greatest sports heroes in American culture and is considered by many to be the greatest baseball player of all time. In 1936, Ruth was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members.
Samuel Newbold died on 30 Aug 1936 at the age of 86
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Samuel Newbold (2 Aug 1850 - 30 Aug 1936), BillionGraves Record 1173754 Smithfield, Cache, Utah, United States

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