Samuel Roskelley

1 Jan 1837 - 10 Feb 1914

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Samuel Roskelley

1 Jan 1837 - 10 Feb 1914
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Roskelley, Samuel, 'Grandpa Roskelley Looks at Life,' Roskelley Organ 1, no. 1 (1 June 1951): 10-13. Trail Excerpt RELATED COMPANIES Appleton M. Harmon Company RELATED PERSONS Hulda Barnes Kimball Appleton Milo Harmon Samuel Roskelley George Taylor SOURCE LOCATIONS Family History Library, Salt Lake
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Life Information

Samuel Roskelley

Nasceu:
Morreu:

Smithfield City Cemetery

376-424 E Center St
Smithfield, Cache, Utah
United States

Headstone Description

Partriarch Samue Roskelley son of Thomas & Ann Kitt Roskelley. Born Devenport Devon, England Pioneer of Utah Oct. 16,1853. Died at Smithfield
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Gina369

May 6, 2012
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doclouie

April 1, 2012

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Samuel Roskelley Pioneer Journal Entry 1853

Colaborador: Gina369 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Roskelley, Samuel, "Grandpa Roskelley Looks at Life," Roskelley Organ 1, no. 1 (1 June 1951): 10-13. Trail Excerpt RELATED COMPANIES Appleton M. Harmon Company RELATED PERSONS Hulda Barnes Kimball Appleton Milo Harmon Samuel Roskelley George Taylor SOURCE LOCATIONS Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Our company being organized--Appleton M. Harmon was appointed Captain and we set out to cross the state of Iowa, but no pen can describe the starting. Thirteen or fourteen of the teams were composed of young wild steers with perhaps one yoke of partly broke cattle to each wagon. Teamsters composed of men fresh from cotton factories and work shops-many of whom had never seen two animals with a yoke on their necks before arriving at the camp ground at Keokuk. They knew as much about Gee and Haw as the unbroken steers in the team. In using a whip, such teamsters would as frequently strike themselves as the animal they were aiming at. Plank roads were frequent and sometimes of considerable length, bridging large and deep sloughs and ponds of stagnant water. While passing over these roads, herders would be placed each side of the teams. This in many instances would do more to frighten than keep the team straight consequently, many of the teams made a wild run for the sloughs to gain freedom, running over their herders and into water and mud half day [way] up their sides, tipping over wagons, breaking bows, boxes, tongues and ruining the contents of the wagons with mud and water while the united yelling of woa from the teamsters and herders frightened the cattle until they would get so badly tangled up with turned yokes and the chains around their legs and horns that an axe in the hand of an experienced man would have to be used to cut the bows and free the cattle from death by drowning. Then acusations from teamsters or herders or both, would follow in quick succession and while wading from knee deep to half way up to the armpits in mud and sluch would be forgotten for the time being and war of words unbecoming Saints-indulged in. Thus on our road to Zion we had the privilege of learning the art of self government if we would improve it. As night came on, Camp was formed on as dry place as could be found near a creek and the cattle unchained from each other, would be turned out to feed after a colored string of some sort had been tied around the horses or the yoke by the green teamsters so he might know his cattle when driven up in the morning. Wood and water brought to Camp and the skill of a green factory girl as also the English house wife would be tested in frying bacon and slapjacks for the mess. (usually of 10 persons) Burnt fingers, scorched hair, tired limbs and more tired throats of the men who lay around the fire stretched upon the ground to get a little ease for their aching limbs or drying their clothes after wading through the sloughs and mud, closed the days labors after prayer and the setting of the guard for the night. Mattes improved day by day as the teamsters and cattle knew each other better. Becomes Teamster in Stewarts Freight Company Arriving at Council Bluffs 4 July 1853, we crossed the Missippi river in a ferry boat and wended our way toward the setting sun. Nothing of particular interest occurred with me until a little over 2 weeks before arriving at Fort Laramie. Our train overtook a Freight train of goods under Captain Andrew Jackson Stewart, of Springville, Utah. He was crippled for lack of teamsters and asked our captain for help, promising liberal wages to those who would then engage to drive teams for him to Utah. A few were selected-myself among the number to help drive these teams. Captain Harmon's train passed forward leaving Captain Stewart to follow. I remained with his train until it passed Fort Laramie. When looking in my satchel I discovered to my dismay that the best of my clothing was gone. I supposed by some of the teamsters who left the train at Laramie because of the abuse from Captain Stewart. The train becoming short handed through these teamsters leaving the train at Laramie, greater burdens were placed upon those remaining until it became almost unbearable and I hold [told] the Captain I could not stand it. He answered I'd have to stand it or leave the train, which latter alternative he thought I had not the courage to do. But waiting until morning I put a little bread in my pockets, my carpet sack in my blankets and told him I wanted something for my services rendered. He was (non plussed). He thought to dissuade me from leaving his train and said he could not pay me till he got to Utah. But I had made up my mind that I might as well die in an attempt to overtake Captain Harmon's Company as to be killed by overwork and buried, li[k]e a dog, by Captain Stewart and his train hands. Being an Englishman, those claiming American birth, took every opportunity to impose upon me and I was tired of it. Alone On the Vast Plains I had on idea of the road or how far Captain Harmon's train was in advance of me but had idea I could probably reach it in about a days forced travel. I set out with my pack over my shoulder as best I could with a light heart as I considered I was exchanging oppression for freedom. As the sun became warmer I began to walk slower, for my pack became heavier each mile I traveled. The train behind me was soon lost sight of and my lonliness aided my anxiety to reach the train I desired. Crossing a stream of water or coming to the bank of the Platte river I would sit down on my pack, wish it was lighter, soak my hard bread in the water, kneel down and ask the Father to guide my footsteps aright, then with tired limbs press forward on my journey. I watched the sun in its decline in the West, eagerly straining every nerve of my eyes to discover, if possible, the curling smoke of a camp fire or some signs of life on those vast plains, but my efforts were fruitless. Occassionally on the road I had picked up a buffalo skull or shoulder blade that the beating storms of years had bleached white, with something like the following written upon it in pencil. "Captain H.C. Wheelock's company passed here at ......o'clock A.M. on the ...day of August 1853". "All well." "Captain Appleton Harmon's company camped three miles East of this point last night and buried 2 emigrants...day of August, 1853." But these sign boards were of little value to me as I did not know the day of the month. For in the train I had been with, Sunday was unknown. I scarcely knew for certain what day of the week it was. Alone-Night and the Howling Wolves Night drew nigh apace, I was tired, very tired, footsore and my poor shoulders ached beyond measure carrying my pack. What should I do? Travel as long as I could drag a foot, or lie down and take a rest till the morning? Prudence suggested that I rest somewhere--I looked around. All seemed cheerless. I saw about 1/2 mile distant, a ledge of rocks on a little rising bluff, and resolved to get there if possible, which I accomplished just as it became dark. I found a projecting ledge of rock and mechanically unrolled my bundle and laid [down]. not knowing whether I should ever rise again. Entirely alone--many miles from any human being that I knew of. I queried to myself, is this what I left parents, kindred and friends for to die alone on these almost trackless plains-and be eaten by wolves and wild beasts who may gather around my carcess and fight over the possession of a fragment of my remains? This thought was intensified by hearing the howling wolves not far from me. The picture of my once pleasant home and its inmates around the festive board gave my almost famished stomach and gnawing vitals but little comfort. The recollection of most of the acts of my life came before me in quick succession and I seemingly was in the presence of God. The last I knew I was praying to be preserved that I might go to Zion and live with the Saints of God. I must have slept an hour or two and when I awoke I felt much refreshed although my bed was a ledge of rock and not as comfortable as some beds. I turned over many times before morning-my cogitations and peculiar situation kept me awake but I had the satisfaction of hearing the howling of the wolves farther away than when I lay down to rest. I resolved to proceed on my journey as soon as I could see my way in the morning, for I felt that the Lord would grant me my desires and the desires of the Elders before leaving England would be realized--Viz: "I should go to the land of Zion." Sundown-Sights Capt. Harmon's Co. I arose with the dawn of day and gathered up my bundle and hobbled along as best I could, wondering what would be the results of the coming day. When I came to the water I sat down, soaked my remaining crust, ate thankfully--washed my feet and proceeded on my way, praying and hoping that deliverance would come and give me the opportunity of again mingling with Saints and friends. When near sun--down, with hopes and fears comingled after a long and tiresome days' travel. With blistered feet and aching limbs, I came upon the camp nestled on the bank of the Platte River. My friends were surprised to see me and asked many questions, which I postponed answering until I got something to eat, which was forthcoming. The Captain, learning I was in camp, came to see me and asked me how I got along with Captain Stewart and why I came back to his camp? I told him how I had been treated during my stay and of my adventure in returning to his camp and what I had passed through coming from one camp to the other, afoot and alone. He seemed pleased I had courage enough to do as I had done, and told me he was glad I had got back again--but the strain, physically and mentally had been too much for me. I had overdone myself and had sown the germs of sickness in my system, for when I went to my quarters to rest, I seemed on fire throughout my entire system and the fever seemed to be eating me up. Next morning I started with the camp, assisting in whatever I was called upon to do by the Captain of 10, but it seemed the trail traveled too fast for it halted at noon and the cattle were turned out to graze before I caught up with it. But as I staggered into the camp it happened I sat down or rather fell down on the tongue of Captain Harmon's wagon and there fainted from nervous prostration. Sister Hulda Barnes (Captain Harmon's sister) came to me with others and applied such restoratives as were at hand but I was too sick to realize much. She however nursed me tenderly as a son and after a few days I was able to be around again, feeling very thankful for the kindness I had received at the hands of so good a woman-for she seemed to spare me no pains to give me every comfort in her power. As we got into Black Hills the weather became cooler and my health better. The scenery along the road became more varied the farther west we traveled and consequently the more pleasure I took. I have neglected to mention Bro. George Taylor from Nottingham Conference, England whom I first met in the Bachelors Hall on board ship. A friendship grew up between us of a lasting character. We spent many hours on the ship and crossing the plains, walking, singing and discoursing together, and whenever we could be--were bed fellows. Short Rations After leaving the sweetwater river, our provisions got short and we were put on short allowance until we met some teams with provisions from Utah and the nearer we approached the Valleys, the more teams they were expecting to meet in the emigrant trains. With what pleasure I have looked upon seeing the reunion of husbands, wives and children and bosom friends, meeting each other on those dreary plains after having been absent from each other in many cases for years--but under those sun burned faces and necks--those ragged clothes--those rough exteriors, beat hearts that had courage to forsake father and mother, house and lands, husbands, wives, children and friends for the gospel sake and surmount trials of the most severe character to build up a Zion under the direction of a living priesthood, guided by Him who shapes the destinies of all who trust in Him. Green River, Fort Bridger past, all were getting anxious to see the far famed valleys of Utah and many were the speculations indulged in relation to the future. Bird's Eye View of Salt Lake Valley The summits of the big and little mountains reached, the "bird's eye view" of the Western side of Salt Lake Valley looked lovely beyond description. The captain told us we might get into the city the next day if no accidents occurred. Arrived in Zion Sunday October 16, 1853 In crossing the bench from the mouth of Emigration canyon to the Bluff east of the city, our eyes were feasted with the sublime sight we had desired so long to see and we caught a view of the City the throbbing of our hearts increased and our anticipations were realized-the promise of the Elders at Devonpart fulfilled--"I had come to Zion." We camped on the 16th ward square Salt Lake City--Sunday, 16 October, 1853, a little west of the place where now stands the Deseret University. Friends met friends and took them from the camp ground to their homes. By night over half the company was gone. Rights and Use Information (Updated 2/21/2012)Privacy Policy (Updated 2/1/2012) © 2013 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints | Church WebsitesClose Church Websites Samuel Roskelley Individual Information Perpetual Emigrating Fund, General Files (except for 1847-49 which are in Camp of Israel schedules and reports, 1845-1849). Source Location Church Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah Roskelley, Samuel, "Grandpa Roskelley Looks at Life," Roskelley Organ 1, no. 1 (1 June 1951): 10-13. Trail Excerpt Source Location Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah Ship Passenger and Manifest Lists Source Location Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah English Church Employment Help Rights and Use Information (Updated 2/21/2012)Privacy Policy (Updated 2/1/2012) © 2013 by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints | Church WebsitesClose Church Websites

Grandpa Roskelley's Journal Record (24 March 1883 - 1 March 1885)

Colaborador: Gina369 Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Samuel Roskelley, First Recorder at the Logan Temple Fills Many Positions Samuel Roskelley, lone convert from his family at the age of fourteen, filled many positions in the church during the nearly sixty-three years he lived and labored after his baptism. Ordained an elder at sixteen, he came to Zion the same year. Called personally by Brigham Young, he was back in his native land as a missionary when nineteen years of age. He married Rebecca Hendricks a month after returning from this mission and later moved to Cache Valley with the Hendricks family. Called and ordained Bishop of Smithfield when twenty-four years of age by Apostle Ezra T. Benson, he served in that capacity for eighteen years. While Bishop, he was selected as the Major of the Smithfield Battalion and elected Mayor of Smithfield, receiving the first charter for the City of Smithfield. He was superintendent of Cache Valley common schools for six years and during this time was called to preach in all of the countries of the Territory in the interest of the common schools as a missionary, by President John Taylor. He left on a second mission to England in April of 1880. Served as president of the London Conference and returned in July 1881. All of these calls were filled honorably and efficiently and to the satisfaction of all concerned. He praised God for all of His blessings and expressed an abiding faith that divine providence was over all. He had suffered many trails, disappointments and bereavements. High Priest President and Temple Mission Called to preside over the High Priests of Cache Valley Stake, and set apart by President Joseph F. Smith, Wilford Woodruff, Erastus Snow and five apostles on August 6, 1882. He at the same time was called on a mission to the St. George Temple to learn the ordinances thereof. His wife, Margaret, was called with him for this mission. This call seemed to portend that which was to come, a call, which was to fill nearly all of the remaining years of his life. At St. George he not only was diligent in learning and performing his duties but in company with President McAllister visited most of the wards and branches of that area and preached to the Saints. He received the following letter as he was leaving St. George. St. George Temple, 16 March 1883 President John Taylor and Wilford Woodruff: Dear Brethren: As Samuel Roskelley is about to return home we cheerfully give him this letter of commendation. During his labors here he has applied himself diligently in the parts assigned him, and in the recorders department, for baptisms, and endowments, sealing, adoptions and anointing. His wife Margaret Roskelley has been faithful and is fully prepared for temple labor. Praying our Father to bless them in all the labors of life. With kind regards, I am, Your brother in the Gospel, John D. T. McAllister Samuel Roskelley esteemed the foregoing letter highly and felt satisfied with his own labors, although anxious to be back with his family, expressed regret at leaving the Temple after seven months. March 9th, 1884 he was appointed to superintend the carpeting, fitting up and preparing for use of Logan Temple. Thus he became familiar with this Sacred House of the Lord in which he was to spend most of his time for twenty-seven years. Let us read from his own pen of the events of this period as recorded for his posterity in his journals. Early in 1883 his journal indicates the important role he was taking in the preparing of the temple and the people for the wonderful work that was to be begun there in the near future. Visits Temple Superintendent Saturday, 24th March 1883 Several Brethren going to Logan invited me to go also. I went with Brother Thomas Hilliard and had a good visit with Superintendent Charles O. Card of the temple construction and with him went through the building and I was delighted with the progress and class of work being done. Friday, 4th May 1883 I met the 11:40 p.m. passenger train at Smithfield station and met President Wilford Woodruff and escorted him to his house. Saturday, 5th May 1883 I took President Woodruff and my wife Margaret and my son James to the Logan quarterly conference. In the evening in company with President Taylor, Cannon, Woodruff and several of the Quorum of the twelve, I visited the temple and am very pleased with the progress made on the building. Monday, 4th June 1883 I went to Logan and conversed with Bishop Thomas Smith and President Moses Thatcher and received their unqualified promise of any aid they could render me in furnishing genealogical records for Saints. Visits With President Woodruff Sunday, 5th August 1883 Went to Logan to Conference and took the place of Brother James Leishman, the clerk of the conference for the forenoon as his family was sick. President Wilford Woodruff preached on the object of building temples and the class of work performed in them, a sermon replete with instruction to the Saints. President Erastus Snow preached in afternoon on a variety of topics suited to the times we live in. My wives, Mary Jane and Margaret were at the two days meetings. After the meetings were over we went to the temple and went through it visiting all the rooms. President Woodruff spent the week at Smithfield resting and recuperating, and I had a number of pleasant chats with him, and with him laid hands on a number of sick, blessing them. Sunday, 9th December 1883 Through a misunderstanding Brother Smart was not able to take me to Logan to the monthly high priest district meeting and as I did not learn it until very late, I walked to Logan, as I could not get time to go to my farm to get a team. I found our high priests meeting adjourned to the tabernacle where a Sunday school conference was being held. President George Cannon presiding, attended morning and afternoon meetings. In conversing with President William B. Preston after meeting he asked me to submit a list of names for temple workers when the temple shall be opened. Sunday, 23rd December 1883 With my son William, I visited Benson Ward and talked to the Saints about three quarters of an hour in the afternoon on the ordinances necessary for the redemption of the dead and held a meeting of the members of the high priest quorum afterward. Instructs Saints Sunday, 6th January 1884 I took my wife Mary Jane to visit sister Hyde at Hyde Park. I attended meeting in the afternoon and spoke to the Saints ninety minutes on the temple ordinances. Monday, 4th February 1884 By invitations of Brother Franklin D. Richards I went through the temple with the presidency and apostles and had a good view of all of it, some changes were suggested by President Taylor and Wilford Woodruff. Monday, 11th February 1884 An exceedingly stormy day I rode to Logan and worked at the Tithing Office till the following Saturday, during the week I handed President William B. Preston a list of names from various parts of the Valley and recommended them as persons I believed would make good temple hands. Thursday, 21st February 1884 With Bishop George L. Farrell, Elder James H. Martineau and clerk of the construction of the temple, Elder James A. Leishman, I visited and went through the temple at Logan and was highly gratified to see the building in so forward a state, the seats are nearly all made and ready for painting and several of the rooms are now being painted the last coat of paint. To Superintend Carpeting and Fixtures Sunday, 9th March 1884 During the day at Logan Brother Charles O. Card, the superintendent of the construction of the Logan Temple invited me to come to Logan and assist in a plan to fix the carpets, screens and other matters in the arrangements of the temple. Tuesday, 11th Mar 1884 I went to Logan and consulted with Brother Charles O. Card, the superintendent and Truman O. Anjell, Jr., the architect, about things necessary for the temple to fit it up properly, and Wednesday with Brother Anjell I measure all the rooms to be carpeted and wrote a bill for the carpet for the building. First Class Carpet 703 yards Second Class Carpet 258 yards Home Made 2264 yards Total 3225 Yards I also made out in writing a number of suggestions about the seating and many other things pertaining to the temple addressed to superintendent Charles O. Card and he took the same to Salt lake City to submit to the temple committee of the apostles and the church presidency. Thursday, 13th March 1884 Got all the carpet on hand measured up and the lower rooms all fixed to commence to cut and lay it down, and had Brother James A. Leishman the clerk of the Logan Temple, write to Sister Libby Benson, the president of Cache Valley Stake Relief Society, to furnish a few sisters to sew up carpet for the temple rooms. I slept in the temple office on a cot bedstead made on purpose for me by Brother White, feeling thankful I had the privilege to labor in preparing the Temple of God for the Endowment of his Saints. Friday, 21st March 1884 I took the team and went to Logan on temple business. Brother Charles O. Card, the superintendent of construction made a formal request that I take charge of the fitting up and laying carpets of the temple. Sunday, 6th April 1884 Attended meeting of Saints in the afternoon and heard Brother George Barber talk after which I followed him for near forty minutes on marriage and the fashion of the day. After meeting Brother Preston Moorehead called on me and gave him some drawings made by Thomas Anjell, architect of Logan Temple, for some articles to be made for the temple at Logan. Monday, 14th April 1884 I worked in the temple at the carpets and had sixteen of the sisters sewing on them also. My wife Maggie worked in the temple all week with me. Sunday, 27th April 1884 Attended high priest meeting at Smithfield in the morning. Received a letter from Charles O. Card on the temple asking me to come back to the temple as soon as I can to push along the work. Wednesday, 13th May 1884 I set my wife Margaret and Sister Benson and Lucy B. Cardon to making the veils for Logan Temple after I cut them out. In the afternoon President Taylor, Cannon, Woodruff and Apostles Erastus Snow and several others were present and went through the temple, and seemed well pleased in every particular so far as the building and its fixtures were concerned although we had much to do yet. Thursday, 14th May 1884 Today our recorder books arrived having been furnished by the trustee in trust of the Church. Seventy-eight record and index books, also stationary for the use of the temple, and I placed them in our cupboard made for the purpose. They are a handsome set of records and books. I kept everybody around me busy making and putting down carpet and cleaning, dusting and making the rooms ready for the work designed, till ten o’ clock on Saturday morning 17 May 1884. At which time thousands of people had gathered at the gates of the Temple block seeking an entrance to the dedicatory services. I had had the entire charge of and arranging of the stands and large rooms of the temple, and when the doors were opened and the flood of people entered showing their tickets to the doorkeeper at the entrance, it looked almost like a sea of hands coming into the doorways. At half past ten o’ clock President John Taylor called the attention of the congregation and the proceedings of the dedication are about as contained in the following report. I occupied the third stand of the Melchizedek side of the house as president of the high priests quorum of the Cache Valley Stake of Zion with my councilors and many other presidencies of stakes of high priests quorum were present in the stand during the three days of dedication. We had a glorious time and one long to be remembered by the Saints who were privileged to be present, and although I was almost done out with working in fixing and preparing the building both for the dedication services as also for the use designed when fully completed. I rejoice much under the influence that prevailed in the building during the exercises. My wives, Mary, Mary Jane, and Maggie attended the dedication on Sunday, and Monday my sons, Samuel, James, William and Joseph attended the Monday meeting being repletion of the services. On Saturday, Sunday and Monday, May 17th, 18th, and 19th the days of the dedication I was at work till time of the meetings and from then close till night. Monday, 19th May 1884 While at work arranging the building for work on the 21st, I was summoned by telephone and a carriage sent for me to Apostle Moses Thatcher’s where President Taylor, Canon, Joseph F. Smith, and all the Twelve save Brigham Young, Francis M. Lyman and John H. Smith, also several of the brethren from various parts of the Territory were present, and the following named persons were selected by vote of all present to fill the offices opposite their names in the Temple at Logan. Samuel Roskelley for Recorder, wife Margaret for worker John Crouther, Engineer William McNiel, Janitor N. C. Edlefsen, for worker On the same evening of the same day, Brother Charles O. Card and I with consent of John Taylor called upon persons to labor in the Temple. Tuesday, 20th May 1884 President John Taylor and party came to the temple and examined the water arrangements and all other things he wished so as to see that all was ready for the work of tomorrow, and the carpet having arrived by express train in the afternoon. With Robert A. Bain I went to work at twenty minutes to six p.m. and by eight o’ clock next morning, I had the celestial floor nearly covered with the carpet although it was not sewn together, but it met the approval of President John Taylor as it was. Set Apart and Blessed Wednesday, 21st May 1884 A company of Saints met for baptism and endowments and at twenty-five minutes past eight the following named brethren assembled in the east rooms, east of garden and blessed twelve bottles of oil for anointing purposes: President Joseph F. Smith, Erastus Snow, Heber J. Grant, Daniel H. Wells, Angus M. Cannon, Patriarch John Smith, Apostle Erastus Snow was mouth, and afterward the same brethren blessed six bottles of oil for second anointings. When going into the font room shortly afterwards, I met President Taylor and his councilors and most of the members of the twelve when President Taylor said to me “We have just elected Brother Marriner W. Merrill President of the Temple and I want you to vote too.” So I put up my hand and voted, he and the other brethren then went into the garden and at twenty minutes past nine a.m. Brother Merrill was set apart to preside over the Logan Temple by President John Taylor, assisted by his councilors and the members of the twelve apostles. President Taylor then requested me to sit on the same seat Brother Merrill had just been sitting on to be ordained and the same persons laid their hands on me and President George Q. Cannon being mouth set me apart for recorder for this temple and blessed me with great blessings. Among them gifts of interpretation and discernment of the thoughts of the Saints, and reading and understanding obscure writing and genealogy, and then we commenced to work. Fifty-one were baptized for the dead and living, fifty-nine were endowed, one person ordained elder and nine persons received second anointings. Among the number endowed was my son James whose record was the first taken in the house of endowment. After the labors of the day was over, the Presidency expressed themselves well satisfied. The day has been a blessed day to us who have had the privilege to labor in the house set apart for the performance of the ordinances of the Gospel. We have had a good time and rejoiced much. Thursday, 22nd May 1884 About ten a.m. President Taylor and his councilors and members of the twelve came into the temple and looked through a number of the rooms and at 10:20 the following named persons came into the recorders office where I was writing at the table: President John Taylor, George Q. Cannon, Joseph F. Smith, Lorenzo Snow, Wilford Woodruff, Franklin D. Richards, Moses Thatcher, George Teasdale, Daniel H. Wells, John D. T. McAllister, Angus M. Cannon, L. J. Nuttall, David Cannon, Marriner W. Merrill, Bishop William B. Preston, Charles O. Card, Erastus Snow, and George W. Thatcher came in while President Taylor was talking. President Taylor turned to me as I was sitting writing and said, “I want you recorders to place on the records of the Temple that the Lord is well pleased and has accepted this house and our labors in its dedication, also the labors of this people in its building and beautifying and whatever [the] Saints may feel to place into it to ornament and embellish it will also be accepted. I state this as the word of the Lord and the Lord will continue to reveal unto us every principle that shall be necessary for our guidance in the future in all matters pertaining to our labors both spiritually and temporally.” He afterwards said, “God accepts us if we will do his will and He will sustain us and no power shall have power to do us any harm or injure us. I feel to bless you brethren present in the name of Israel’s God and your families shall be blessed and God will raise you up and lift you on high. I feel like shouting Hallelujah, Hallelujah, Hallelujah for the Lord God Omnipotent reigneth. Glory to God for his kingdom and people shall triumph in the name of Israel’s God.” The spirit and influence that filled the room brought conviction to the minds and hearts of all present that the words of President Taylor were true and faithful. From here on many of the entries in Samuel Roskelley’s diary are simply tabulations of the day’s activities in the Temple. Samuel Roskelley, Friend of Leaders We have noted earlier the close association Samuel Roskelley enjoyed with the Prophet Brigham Young, working for him and living in the Lion House, even assuming the responsibility of watching over Brigham’s families in his absence and calling them together for family prayers. Some of the important pages are missing. Now it is interesting to note that there were present and participating in the setting apart of Samuel for this office as recorder five men who were or were to become Presidents and Prophets of our great Church. Pasted into his diary are letters written to him by many of these leaders. Six of the nine presidents of the restored Church were friends of Samuel Roskelley. Although not mentioned directly, he must also have known President George A. Smith and President David O. McKay. It has not been deemed advisable to list but just a part of the entries that pertain to Samuel Roskelley’s work in preparing the temple. Let us say that he faithfully gave credit to those who assisted him in this work A summary of the work done in the temple in June 1884 has such headings as new baptisms, renewal of covenants, baptism, and health baptisms as well as baptism for the dead. Also listed are endowments, ordinations, sealings, parents to children, adoptions, and second anointings, each for living and for dead and each total for male and for female. Shortly after the work began in the temple a council of the apostles and others voted to give Samuel Roskelley 1500 dollars a year for his labors in the temple out of the tithing funds. Although this seems a small sum today it must have been very welcome to him at that time. Less than a year passed before persecution of the Saints who were practicing the doctrine of plural marriage began to have an effect in the lives of the Saints. Samuel Roskelley spent a lot of weeks in the temple without leaving it night or day. Sometimes he would slip home under cover of darkness for a weekend visit with some of his family. He had a place he refers to as his hideout where he would go and then have some of his family come there to visit him. Perhaps some of his sons or daughters may know where this hideout was. He used disguises and various sorts of transportation to come and go and avoid the agents who were trying to seize the Saints. On one occasion he received a letter of warning from one Heber J. Grant of Salt Lake City. He consulted with the church authorities about giving himself up but was counseled against it. Many times he expressed his gratitude to our Heavenly Father for protecting him and allowing him to continue his duties. Narrow Escapes His disguises, of course, were very opposite to his true character. He frequently covered himself in the bottom of a wagon, as one of his sons would drive him from place to place. Most of the time he would venture out only at night when detection was not to be easily made. Instead of becoming bitter because of his troubles he is constantly praising the Lord for his blessings. We recopy here one incident from his diary 29 March 1887. A most remarkable circumstance took place. One I shall never forget to be grateful to my Heavenly Father for His overruling hand in delivering me from. I had spent the night from eight to ten at the house of Brother and Sister Townsend and went to the widows to sleep but my mind was uneasy for some cause and I could not rest. I heard the clock strike every half hour thru the night and at three o’clock I got out of bed and dressed in the dark so that a light should not attract anyone who may be passing at that unusual hour. I left the house as the clock struck half past three a.m., taking my usual route by Brother Preston’s lots for the temple. I had prayed before getting out of bed but before leaving the house I had again knelt and asked the Lord to preserve me in going to the temple and preserve me from the hands of wicked men. When I got to the foot bridge across the Logan and Hyde Park canal on the south side of the street I discovered dark objects at the corner of the fence on the southeast corner of the Benson block and in crossing the bridge I discovered that it was men and some had pipes in their mouths smoking. My heart “jumped in my mouth” in a second and as quick as lightening I thought, “I’m caught now sure, what shall I do, go back or continue up the hill or run, or what?” And as I got to the end of the bridge (east side) the thought came to me. Make straight for them and go on. I felt sure they were marshals but I followed the promptings of the Spirit within and the moment I received it I turned straight for them. They had by this time changed positions to the east side of the corner where they could see me, but be more out of my sight. I had my axe on my left arm and a pipe in my mouth and found five men, three with their backs against the fence looking east and two standing a few feet east of them and looking west. I walked between the five with my hand over my pipe, as it had nothing in it. Three of them were very scrutinizing and I suppose seeing my poor garb thought I was not the kind they wanted. As I passed the last two men I bawled out “Good evening gentlemen,” in a course tone of voice and they answered me “Good evening.” I thought I heard them whisper after I passed a couple of rods, so I stopped and struck a match on my right thigh and held it to my pipe as thought in the act of lighting my pipe but I could not hear their conversation. I walked on two or three rods and stopped and lit another match thinking some of them would follow me, but I made my way into the middle of the road and continued two blocks until I got to Sister Margaret P. W. Young’s house when I crawled through the fence and watched to see if they followed me, but not seeing anyone I went and knocked and gained admittance until daylight when I got Sister Young to go to the temple to see if the coast was clear, finding it so, I went to the temple in daylight for the first time in months. When I stopped a second time and lit a match, the suggestion came to me “They are watching for Brother Leishman,” which proved to be true for on seeing Brother James Leishman I learned that they had been searching his house between one and two o’clock and had also searched another house for him with out success and had seemingly come straight from raiding these houses to the place I found them. Brother Larson afterwards saw them near the fence at Brother Preston’s corner and they were no doubt out all night raiding and watching to catch someone. They looked like so many demons to me, and the feeling I had while going towards them and while passing them was simply awful. I feel that this was a direct interposition of my Heavenly Father in causing these men to not lay their hands on me, when in their power to do so. I never thought of fear while passing through it but after getting to the temple, every time I would think of it, it would almost make my blood turn cold. Later he was finally arrested and brought to court but was releases. He gave all thanks to his Heavenly Father for bringing about his freedom on this occasion. His prayers together with all the temple workers he felt brought an answer from above. All of his friends and family were overjoyed at his release. Sense of Humor Prevailed That he maintained his sense of humor through all may be shown by this entry in his diary. “The month of June passed with an occasional breeze made by the marshals in hunting after our brethren and friends, the appointment of Mr. Peters as District Attorney for the Territory witnessed a little change for the better.” Samuel’s duties in the temple and in the high priests quorum and for his family occupied his thoughts and his desires and an almost tireless devotion and effort. His only recreation seemed to be visiting with his family. The celebration of his birthday was the highlight of each year. All of his family that could would gather at the farm and sing and dance and eat, usually until midnight. Sometimes friends were also invited to be with them. Regardless of the hour of retiring, five a.m. would find Samuel Roskelley up and getting ready to go to the temple. He was so regular in the days when he drove back and forth each morning from Smithfield that farmers along the way would check their clocks by him or so we have been told by some of them. Records Taken From the Temple for Safekeeping On more than one occasion the records were taken from the temple to some hiding place lest they be seized by the marshals. Samuel’s sons were called on to help him in taking these precautions. He mentions a place of deposit in Logan and at a later time the records were taken to Smithfield. They were returned [to the temple] a few at a time. The following entry recalls the blessing given him when he was set apart [as Logan Temple Recorder]. Monday, 1st March 1885 I today took the record of ten male and ten female Laminates for baptism and it took me all day as the language had to be written, for I much question if the names of the dead Indians were ever before written, thus the work of the Lord is commenced among that people. These Laminates were baptized on Tuesday 2nd March 1885 and they continued the work of endowments Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, much to their gratification.1 footnote line 1.The Roskelley Organ, pages 1-8.

Trail Excerpt: Samuel Roskelley - Appleton M Harmon

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Roskelley, Samuel, "Grandpa Roskelley Looks at Life," Roskelley Organ 1, no. 1 (1 June 1951): 10-13. Our company being organized--Appleton M. Harmon was appointed Captain and we set out to cross the state of Iowa, but no pen can describe the starting. Thirteen or fourteen of the teams were composed of young wild steers with perhaps one yoke of partly broke cattle to each wagon. Teamsters composed of men fresh from cotton factories and work shops-many of whom had never seen two animals with a yoke on their necks before arriving at the camp ground at Keokuk. They knew as much about Gee and Haw as the unbroken steers in the team. In using a whip, such teamsters would as frequently strike themselves as the animal they were aiming at. Plank roads were frequent and sometimes of considerable length, bridging large and deep sloughs and ponds of stagnant water. While passing over these roads, herders would be placed each side of the teams. This in many instances would do more to frighten than keep the team straight consequently, many of the teams made a wild run for the sloughs to gain freedom, running over their herders and into water and mud half day [way] up their sides, tipping over wagons, breaking bows, boxes, tongues and ruining the contents of the wagons with mud and water while the united yelling of woa from the teamsters and herders frightened the cattle until they would get so badly tangled up with turned yokes and the chains around their legs and horns that an axe in the hand of an experienced man would have to be used to cut the bows and free the cattle from death by drowning. Then acusations from teamsters or herders or both, would follow in quick succession and while wading from knee deep to half way up to the armpits in mud and sluch would be forgotten for the time being and war of words unbecoming Saints-indulged in. Thus on our road to Zion we had the privilege of learning the art of self government if we would improve it. As night came on, Camp was formed on as dry place as could be found near a creek and the cattle unchained from each other, would be turned out to feed after a colored string of some sort had been tied around the horses or the yoke by the green teamsters so he might know his cattle when driven up in the morning. Wood and water brought to Camp and the skill of a green factory girl as also the English house wife would be tested in frying bacon and slapjacks for the mess. (usually of 10 persons) Burnt fingers, scorched hair, tired limbs and more tired throats of the men who lay around the fire stretched upon the ground to get a little ease for their aching limbs or drying their clothes after wading through the sloughs and mud, closed the days labors after prayer and the setting of the guard for the night. Mattes improved day by day as the teamsters and cattle knew each other better. Becomes Teamster in Stewarts Freight Company Arriving at Council Bluffs 4 July 1853, we crossed the Missippi river in a ferry boat and wended our way toward the setting sun. Nothing of particular interest occurred with me until a little over 2 weeks before arriving at Fort Laramie. Our train overtook a Freight train of goods under Captain Andrew Jackson Stewart, of Springville, Utah. He was crippled for lack of teamsters and asked our captain for help, promising liberal wages to those who would then engage to drive teams for him to Utah. A few were selected-myself among the number to help drive these teams. Captain Harmon's train passed forward leaving Captain Stewart to follow. I remained with his train until it passed Fort Laramie. When looking in my satchel I discovered to my dismay that the best of my clothing was gone. I supposed by some of the teamsters who left the train at Laramie because of the abuse from Captain Stewart. The train becoming short handed through these teamsters leaving the train at Laramie, greater burdens were placed upon those remaining until it became almost unbearable and I hold [told] the Captain I could not stand it. He answered I'd have to stand it or leave the train, which latter alternative he thought I had not the courage to do. But waiting until morning I put a little bread in my pockets, my carpet sack in my blankets and told him I wanted something for my services rendered. He was (non plussed). He thought to dissuade me from leaving his train and said he could not pay me till he got to Utah. But I had made up my mind that I might as well die in an attempt to overtake Captain Harmon's Company as to be killed by overwork and buried, li[k]e a dog, by Captain Stewart and his train hands. Being an Englishman, those claiming American birth, took every opportunity to impose upon me and I was tired of it. Alone On the Vast Plains I had on idea of the road or how far Captain Harmon's train was in advance of me but had idea I could probably reach it in about a days forced travel. I set out with my pack over my shoulder as best I could with a light heart as I considered I was exchanging oppression for freedom. As the sun became warmer I began to walk slower, for my pack became heavier each mile I traveled. The train behind me was soon lost sight of and my lonliness aided my anxiety to reach the train I desired. Crossing a stream of water or coming to the bank of the Platte river I would sit down on my pack, wish it was lighter, soak my hard bread in the water, kneel down and ask the Father to guide my footsteps aright, then with tired limbs press forward on my journey. I watched the sun in its decline in the West, eagerly straining every nerve of my eyes to discover, if possible, the curling smoke of a camp fire or some signs of life on those vast plains, but my efforts were fruitless. Occassionally on the road I had picked up a buffalo skull or shoulder blade that the beating storms of years had bleached white, with something like the following written upon it in pencil. "Captain H.C. Wheelock's company passed here at ......o'clock A.M. on the ...day of August 1853". "All well." "Captain Appleton Harmon's company camped three miles East of this point last night and buried 2 emigrants...day of August, 1853." But these sign boards were of little value to me as I did not know the day of the month. For in the train I had been with, Sunday was unknown. I scarcely knew for certain what day of the week it was. Alone-Night and the Howling Wolves Night drew nigh apace, I was tired, very tired, footsore and my poor shoulders ached beyond measure carrying my pack. What should I do? Travel as long as I could drag a foot, or lie down and take a rest till the morning? Prudence suggested that I rest somewhere--I looked around. All seemed cheerless. I saw about 1/2 mile distant, a ledge of rocks on a little rising bluff, and resolved to get there if possible, which I accomplished just as it became dark. I found a projecting ledge of rock and mechanically unrolled my bundle and laid [down]. not knowing whether I should ever rise again. Entirely alone--many miles from any human being that I knew of. I queried to myself, is this what I left parents, kindred and friends for to die alone on these almost trackless plains-and be eaten by wolves and wild beasts who may gather around my carcess and fight over the possession of a fragment of my remains? This thought was intensified by hearing the howling wolves not far from me. The picture of my once pleasant home and its inmates around the festive board gave my almost famished stomach and gnawing vitals but little comfort. The recollection of most of the acts of my life came before me in quick succession and I seemingly was in the presence of God. The last I knew I was praying to be preserved that I might go to Zion and live with the Saints of God. I must have slept an hour or two and when I awoke I felt much refreshed although my bed was a ledge of rock and not as comfortable as some beds. I turned over many times before morning-my cogitations and peculiar situation kept me awake but I had the satisfaction of hearing the howling of the wolves farther away than when I lay down to rest. I resolved to proceed on my journey as soon as I could see my way in the morning, for I felt that the Lord would grant me my desires and the desires of the Elders before leaving England would be realized--Viz: "I should go to the land of Zion." Sundown-Sights Capt. Harmon's Co. I arose with the dawn of day and gathered up my bundle and hobbled along as best I could, wondering what would be the results of the coming day. When I came to the water I sat down, soaked my remaining crust, ate thankfully--washed my feet and proceeded on my way, praying and hoping that deliverance would come and give me the opportunity of again mingling with Saints and friends. When near sun--down, with hopes and fears comingled after a long and tiresome days' travel. With blistered feet and aching limbs, I came upon the camp nestled on the bank of the Platte River. My friends were surprised to see me and asked many questions, which I postponed answering until I got something to eat, which was forthcoming. The Captain, learning I was in camp, came to see me and asked me how I got along with Captain Stewart and why I came back to his camp? I told him how I had been treated during my stay and of my adventure in returning to his camp and what I had passed through coming from one camp to the other, afoot and alone. He seemed pleased I had courage enough to do as I had done, and told me he was glad I had got back again--but the strain, physically and mentally had been too much for me. I had overdone myself and had sown the germs of sickness in my system, for when I went to my quarters to rest, I seemed on fire throughout my entire system and the fever seemed to be eating me up. Next morning I started with the camp, assisting in whatever I was called upon to do by the Captain of 10, but it seemed the trail traveled too fast for it halted at noon and the cattle were turned out to graze before I caught up with it. But as I staggered into the camp it happened I sat down or rather fell down on the tongue of Captain Harmon's wagon and there fainted from nervous prostration. Sister Hulda Barnes (Captain Harmon's sister) came to me with others and applied such restoratives as were at hand but I was too sick to realize much. She however nursed me tenderly as a son and after a few days I was able to be around again, feeling very thankful for the kindness I had received at the hands of so good a woman-for she seemed to spare me no pains to give me every comfort in her power. As we got into Black Hills the weather became cooler and my health better. The scenery along the road became more varied the farther west we traveled and consequently the more pleasure I took. I have neglected to mention Bro. George Taylor from Nottingham Conference, England whom I first met in the Bachelors Hall on board ship. A friendship grew up between us of a lasting character. We spent many hours on the ship and crossing the plains, walking, singing and discoursing together, and whenever we could be--were bed fellows. Short Rations After leaving the sweetwater river, our provisions got short and we were put on short allowance until we met some teams with provisions from Utah and the nearer we approached the Valleys, the more teams they were expecting to meet in the emigrant trains. With what pleasure I have looked upon seeing the reunion of husbands, wives and children and bosom friends, meeting each other on those dreary plains after having been absent from each other in many cases for years--but under those sun burned faces and necks--those ragged clothes--those rough exteriors, beat hearts that had courage to forsake father and mother, house and lands, husbands, wives, children and friends for the gospel sake and surmount trials of the most severe character to build up a Zion under the direction of a living priesthood, guided by Him who shapes the destinies of all who trust in Him. Green River, Fort Bridger past, all were getting anxious to see the far famed valleys of Utah and many were the speculations indulged in relation to the future. Bird's Eye View of Salt Lake Valley The summits of the big and little mountains reached, the "bird's eye view" of the Western side of Salt Lake Valley looked lovely beyond description. The captain told us we might get into the city the next day if no accidents occurred. Arrived in Zion Sunday October 16, 1853 In crossing the bench from the mouth of Emigration canyon to the Bluff east of the city, our eyes were feasted with the sublime sight we had desired so long to see and we caught a view of the City the throbbing of our hearts increased and our anticipations were realized-the promise of the Elders at Devonpart fulfilled--"I had come to Zion." We camped on the 16th ward square Salt Lake City--Sunday, 16 October, 1853, a little west of the place where now stands the Deseret University. Friends met friends and took them from the camp ground to their homes. By night over half the company was gone.

Background

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Samuel Roskelley… Portrait of a Pioneer First Temple Recorder The Principal— A Drama by Samuel Roskelley Biography of Samuel Roskelley Samuel RoskelleyEarly Cache ValleyRegarding Samuel RoskelleyLetters Samuel Roskelley Samuel Roskelley, president of the High Priests' quorum in the Benson Stake of Zion, is the son of Thomas Roskelley and Ann Kitt, and was born January 1st, 1837, at Devonport, Devonshire, England. He was the youngest of six children, and received a fair education, preparing for a position under the British government. Attracted by the singing of the Latter-day Saints, in the fall of 1851, he came to their meetings and was soon convinced that they taught Bible truths, and he was consequently baptized December 3rd, 1851, by Elder James Caffall; confirmed December 7th, 1851, by Elder William G. Mills. Although but a boy, he took much interest in the doctrines of the Gospel, and accompanied the Elders and Priests in visiting other towns and villages to preach. Ordinations to the offices of Deacon and Priest soon followed, and by endeavoring to magnify these offices he won the love and esteem of the Elders and Saints and the ill will of his parents and relatives. He filled the positions of branch clerk, conference clerk and book agent, until he was ordained an Elder March 15th, 1853, by Joseph Hall, preparatory to leaving England for Zion, on the ship Falcon. He sailed from Liverpool March 26th, 1853, and landed at New Orleans; thence the journey was continued to Keokuk, Iowa, and he crossed that state and the great plains in Appleton M. Harmon's company, arriving in Salt Lake City, October 16th, 1853, without kindred, or friends, save those in the company he came with. In the spring of 1854 he hired out to President Brigham Young as a teamster, and boarded with his family; he was ordained a Seventy July 1st, 1855, by President Lewis Robbins, and was received the same day as a member of the 2nd quorum of Seventy. He accompanied Bryant Stringam, Andrew Moffatt and others to Cache Valley, to put up hay for Church stock, arriving there July 28th, 1855. Being called by President Brigham Young, he left Salt Lake City Sepember. 12th, 1856, to fill a mission to Great Britain, and he crossed the plains with a missionary company, in charge of Apostle Parley P. Pratt. After his arrival in Liverpool he was appointed to the Welsh mission. May 16th, 1857, he was appointed to organize and preside over the Cardiff conference and he labored with zeal in that position until he was released to return home with European, Canadian and United States missionaries during the Buchanan Army invasion of Utah. Together with Elder John L. Smith he arrived in Salt Lake City June 22nd, 1858, in advance of the company, with dispatches for President Brigham Young. July 22nd, 1858, he married Rebecca Hendricks, of Salt Lake City, President Brigham Young officiating. He moved to Richmond, Cache Valley, and took up land for a homestead in April, 1860, and succeeded Stephen Goddard as leader of the Richmond choir in May of that year. The choir gained much public favor by singing "Hard times come again no more" and other songs of like nature. Elder Roskelley assisted in getting out water ditches, hunting and guarding Indians, protecting and preserving horses and horned stock from the raids of hostiles, driving grasshoppers and burning them by millions, erecting public buildings, and all other labors incident to setting up a new country. He was ordained a High Priest and Bishop and set apart to preside in Smithfield Ward, Cache County, November 30th, 1862, by Apostle Ezra T. Benson, and Peter Maughan. Afterwards he was elected to offices of trust in the Cooperative and Canal companies, in which the people of the Ward were interested. He also acted in the following military offices, viz: captain of company C, 1st regiment of infantry; major of 4th battalion, first regiment of infantry; commissary of 1st regiment infantry, and chaplain of Cache Valley Brigade. He was elected and filled the important office of county superintendent of district schools for three terms, and assisted in obtaining city charter for Smithfield City and presided over its affairs for three terms as mayor; served as director in the construction of the U. & N. R. R. company, and operated as subcontractor in the construction of the S.P.R.R. With twelve days' notice he left Ogden April 13th, 1880, pursuant to a call from President John Taylor, as a missionary to Great Britain. After his arrival in Liverpool April 29th, 1880, he was appointed to labor as traveling Elder, and succeeded Elder George H. Taylor as president of the London conference, introducing the gospel into many new localities. Being released to return to Zion, he left Liverpool June 25th, 1881, in charge of 775 Saints on the steamship Wyoming, and arrived at Ogden with the company July 15th, 1881. August 6th, 1882, he was set apart by President Joseph F. Smith as president of the High Priests' quorum in Cache Valley Stake. At the same conference he was called as a missionary worker to the St. George Temple. After filling that mission, he returned to Cache Valley. March 9th, 1884, he was appointed assistant to superintendent Charles O. Card in fitting up the Logan Temple for ordinance work, and on May 21st, 1884, he was set apart by President George Q. Cannon as recorder of the Logan Temple. He passed through many unpleasant circumstances during the anti-polygamy raid, and was arrested January 8th, 1889, by Deputy Marshal Hudson, charged with having many wives and children-more than the law allowed-but having at the time four living wives and twenty-two living children. Circumstantial evidence, however, were sufficient in the hands of a competent attorney to secure an acquittal. When the Cache Valley Stake was divided, in 1901, Elder Roskelley's home became a part of the Benson Stake, and at the first Stake conference held August 4th, 1901, he was sustained and set apart as president of the High Priests' quorum of said Stake.1 1. Andrew Jensen, Latter-Day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson History Company, 1901, Volume 1, MendonUtah.Net — Copyright 1997-2012 — Rodney J. Sorensen — All Rights Reserved. Contact | Home | History | May Day | Cemetery | Mendon City | Site Map

Life timeline of Samuel Roskelley

1837
Samuel Roskelley was born on 1 Jan 1837
Samuel Roskelley was 3 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Samuel Roskelley was 23 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Samuel Roskelley was 32 years old when Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton founded the National Woman Suffrage Association, breaking away from the American Equal Rights Association which they had also previously founded. Susan B. Anthony was an American social reformer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the women's suffrage movement. Born into a Quaker family committed to social equality, she collected anti-slavery petitions at the age of 17. In 1856, she became the New York state agent for the American Anti-Slavery Society.
Samuel Roskelley was 43 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Samuel Roskelley was 50 years old when Buffalo Bill Cody's Wild West Show opens in London. William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody was an American scout, bison hunter, and showman. He was born in Le Claire, Iowa Territory, but he lived for several years in his father's hometown in Toronto Township, Ontario, Canada, before the family returned to the Midwest and settled in the Kansas Territory.
Samuel Roskelley was 55 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
Samuel Roskelley was 67 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
Samuel Roskelley died on 10 Feb 1914 at the age of 77
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Samuel Roskelley (1 Jan 1837 - 10 Feb 1914), BillionGraves Record 1022874 Smithfield, Cache, Utah, United States

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