Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim)

16 Sep 1836 - 1 May 1888

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Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim)

16 Sep 1836 - 1 May 1888
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Compiled by Frank Weekes in 1958 Sidney Weekes was born at Welling, Kent, England, March 8, 1841. His people were aristocrats of England, owning a large estate. Such crops as were common in England were grain, hay, potatoes, fruits, animals and fowls which were raised on their property. Sidney was b
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Life Information

Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim)

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Smithfield City Cemetery

376-424 E Center St
Smithfield, Cache, Utah
United States

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Susan-wife of Stanley? Weekes
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sjwilk2001

May 1, 2012
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doclouie

April 1, 2012

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History of SIDNEY WEEKES, SUSAN ELIZABETH PILGRIM and ANNIE BENNETT HARRIS

Colaborador: emaclodi Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

Compiled by Frank Weekes in 1958 Sidney Weekes was born at Welling, Kent, England, March 8, 1841. His people were aristocrats of England, owning a large estate. Such crops as were common in England were grain, hay, potatoes, fruits, animals and fowls which were raised on their property. Sidney was baptized a member of the L. D. S. Church when he was eleven years of age. Having been inspired and converted by the Elders of the L. D. S. Church who were proclaiming the Gospel in England, Sidney's parents made the necessary preparations to come to America. They left their home February 1853, crossing the ocean in the ship known as the "International". They arrived in New Orleans, U.S.A. in April of the same year. From there they went to Keokuk, Iowa by steamer. In this family there were six boys and six girls; one of the boys and two girls having died previously in England. At this time Sidney and three of his sisters, Edith, Emma and Mary Ann and one of his brothers, David, made the trip with their parents. Two of Sidney's brothers, Samuel and Benjamin and a brother-in-law, Charles Jones, husband of Mary Ann, came to America the previous year, 1852. Samuel and his family remained in New Orleans, Louisiana and Benjamin and Charles made their way towards Utah. Benjamin was drowned in the Platt River as they were crossing the plains. He died at the age of eighteen. Sidney's oldest brother, Robert, remained in England until his wife, Sarah Parsons, died and then in 1869 he came to Utah and died, 20 August 1883 and is buried in the Smithfield cemetery, Cache Co., Utah. The one brother and two sisters that died in England were John born 1821 and died 1830; Eunice, born 1827 and died as an infant; and Eunice, born 14 October 1831. She lived about three years. This leaves the oldest sister of Sidney, Elizabeth who was born 1 May 1824. She married John Heath and they went to Australia. In May Sidney, his sisters and brother along with their parents, left for Salt Lake City with a company of saints. Moving slowly westward with ox teams and handcarts, this perilous journey lasted five months. Due to severe exposure and hardships Sidney's father became ill. He died at Ft. Laramie or Ft. Bridger, Wyoming and was buried there with perhaps a wagon tire for a marker on his grave. A few years after their arrival in Utah Sidney's brother Samuel, who had remained in New Orleans, Louisiana desired to move west. It was Sidney's task to go and help him move. In order to do so, he had to have some new clothes. Among the necessary articles was a pair of pants. These his sister Edith made by sewing small pieces together as we do for quilt tops. When he returned in October he had grown so tall that his trousers came almost to his knees. His mother cried because he was so grown up. He made this trip successfully by wagon and ox teams. Sidney's mother and family moved from Salt Lake City to Lehi. In April 1860 they moved to Smithfield, Cache County, Utah. In this new home, they planted a couple of crops. Each year they were utterly destroyed by crickets. The saints tried in every way possible to destroy the insects, but in vain. Despair filled their hearts; yet they trusted in God. Flocks of seagulls filled the sky, down they swooped and began devouring the swarms of crickets. During this time, the faithful little mother was barely able to provide food enough for her family. Grandfather said seldom had he enough to satisfy his hunger. His mother and the children gleaned in the fields gathering grain wherever they could. This they threshed by hand and ground through a coffee mill for flour. They lived entirely on foods they could gather this way and by digging tender roots and sprouts in the woods. Sidney assisted his mother in supporting the family until 1864. Sidney then married Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim. She came from Cambridge, England. When she was a little girl her youngest brother became very ill with smallpox, a dreaded disease because of lack of knowledge pertaining to it. The doctors gave up all hopes of saving him, saying death is sure to come soon. At his bedside stood his mother and sister Rebecca who was a member of the LDS Church. Rebecca suggested that the Elders be called to administer to him. They were called and they administered to him and he was healed immediately. This incident no doubt strengthened the faith of the mother but still she was not completely converted to our church. Later Rebecca came to America because of the church. Elizabeth desired very much to come too but her oldest sister Mary Ann and brothers John and Swan ridiculed her and were very sarcastic when she mentioned it. Cheerfully she promised to stay and care for her mother as long as she lived. She was true to her promise, though she became a member of the Church sometime before her mother's death. Her people owned a large estate on which were an elaborate home, a vineyard, and an orchard. Through the courtesy of some of her friends after her father's death, she became the supervisor of a laundry which was near one of the colleges at Cambridge. There they did students washing. Elizabeth hired men and women to help in addition to supervising the work; she assisted with the light work. She did the most delicate pieces of ironing and all other fine work. Her strength would not permit her to help with the washing and heavier work, for in those days, they did all the rubbing by hand due to the belief that wash boards wore clothes out much too soon. She worked on, saving when she could for the desire to come to America grew stronger within her heart. Her family could have easily given her money to come but due to their opposition towards the church she worked and saved. When the time came, she must have been thrilled for she had saved much more than she needed. She shared with a couple of friends who were very anxious to come with her. We know very little of their voyage but we do know that Elizabeth had to cross the plains in a wagon or handcart because she wasn't strong. She was a little taller than medium height. Her hair and eyes were dark brown. She disliked anyone to tell her that they were black. She was very patient and gentle, yet firm. She was very fond of flowers and had a choice selection. Fuchsias and geraniums seemed to be her favorite indoor plants. She did exceptionally fine handiwork; pieces were sent to the Worlds Fair and there received first place. She brought a large amount of stamped goods to be embroidered and various kinds of material to be made into clothing from England when she came. Her cooking was excellent. Possessing these virtues and graces, she appealed to Sidney and they were married 16 July 1864 at the Endowment House at Salt Lake City, Utah. They made their home in Smithfield. It was one of joy and happiness. They seemed to agree perfectly and were very congenial with each other. Six children, three sons: George, John and William, and three daughters Elizabeth, Rebecca and Sarah Ann were sent from above to bless their home. A few years after they were married they built an adobe house. Grandfather carried the adobes and the mortar up the scaffold to the mason. This he did during early morning and evening hours and his farm work went on just the same. Rebecca was the first child born in this house. It may be seen in Smithfield today. They paid a strict tithing and also made it a habit to pay for things as they purchased them. It was decided that Sidney marry another wife, his choice was a young widow, whose name was Annie Bennett Harris. Her husband, Joseph Harris was killed when a load of wood tipped on him the 27th February, 1878. This left the young mother with one small daughter, Martha Elizabeth not quite a year old. Their first child, another daughter Beatrice Ann Harris had died the previous 19 January 1877 with scarlet fever. She was only two years old being born 10 January 1875. These two deaths were indeed sore trials to Annie. Annie was born in Caerleon, Monmouthshire, South Wales, 9 Sept 1857. Her father was William Bennett and her mother was Martha Matthews. There had been no record left of her father and so far no birth date or birth place has been found of him and no mention was made of him by Annie to her children. This obviously leaves a question as to what became of him. According to records and family history we find that her mother and a brother William Phillips and Annie lived for some time in England without a father or husband in the home. William Phillips evidently was a child of another marriage. Annie's mother was born in Llandewi, Yestradenny, Radnorshire, England. Annie spent a little over fifteen years in England and then on October 22, 1873 she sailed with her mother and brother for America on the ship S.S. Idaho. She joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints while in England in the year of 1869 on the 11th of December. At the age of 17 she married Joseph Harris, December 1874 at the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. They lived in Salt Lake for a while where their first child was born and then moved to Smithfield, Utah. As has been stated their married life was cut short by the accidental death of her husband. She married Sidney Weekes in October 4, 1878 in the Endowment House, Salt Lake City, for time only because she had been sealed to Joseph Harris for time and all eternity. Although polygamy was the practice of many Latter-day Saints at that time, it no doubt presented some problems and required much understanding. Sidney already had a wife and six children and one could imagine that there would have to be some hard adjustments made. Sidney decided to find a new home for his second wife and also a place so his sons of the first marriage would have something to do and not leave home and go to Montana where many of their friends had gone. Therefore, he decided to go to Idaho. Sidney's first wife Susan chose to stay in Smithfield because of her strength and failing health which discouraged the thought of starting all over again to make a new home when she already had one there. Sidney and the older boys came to Idaho and homesteaded land in Sunnydell, Fremont now Madison County. This was done in 1883. They built a small one room dirt roof and dirt floor log house on the property. It was during this time that Sidney was made Presiding Elder of the Lyman Branch, in the summer of 1883. The next year Sidney moved his second wife, Annie and their three small daughters, Eunice, Lucinda and Jane being less than a year old. They made the tiresome journey without much trouble until they reached the Snake River which was a treacherous stream to cross. Sidney's faithful team "Prince and Charlie" was selected to pull the wagons across. The horses had to swim and the wagons would float with the wagon boxes tied securely to the running gears. It was either this trip or sometime later that Sidney's brother Samuel and his son Samuel, nephews of Sidney, Robert and William came. The three Sams were identified as Old Sam, Young Sam, and Little Sam. Little Sam fell from one of the wagons and fell under the wheels, the wheels passing over both his legs breaking them. It was Sidney who set those legs and fixed them up with splints. Little Sam alive today testifies of the excellent job done in setting his legs as they healed straight and strong. Sidney and his family moved into the little one room log house in Sunnydell and his brother Sam and sons settled father north and west in Archer. The light for the little log house consisted of a burning grease soaked rag called a bitch light. A sagebrush broom was used for the dirt floor. The mosquitoes were unbearable. They told of them being so bad that sometimes the horses and cattle were completely covered. Smudges were used while milking the cows and when meals were eaten outside. Mosquito nets were used to cover the babies and the men would wear them over their faces while working in the fields. Coats were worn in the summer heat to keep the mosquitoes off. This struggle went on for years. In the new home Sidney and his family toiled vigorously and unceasingly until the farm was under cultivation. Though the boys were only small, they too had a part to play in helping to pull the sturdy sages, clearing the land of bushes and trees, making roads and ditches, herding cows and other tasks that were necessary at that time. In the meantime back in Smithfield, Susan helped to relieve her loneliness, heartaches and disappointments by keeping busy in the church. She worked as a Relief Society teacher and helped those who were old and sick continually. She had implicit faith in the principles of the Gospel. In case of illness in their home, healing was done through the power of God, not by doctors. She often said when she was ill, "Oh, if Sidney were only here to administer to me, I'd be all right". Her testimony had been strengthened greatly in this way. In the fall Sidney and the boys would go back to Smithfield and cut wood enough for Susan, enough to last her till spring. They would bring apples, dried fruit and vegetables back to Sunnydell. It was almost impossible to get them here in those earlier years. While Sidney was in the canyon cutting wood, someone cut down a tree that fell so close to him that his outer clothes were torn badly and his body was very badly bruised, but his garments were as if untouched. Some of the men were sent to Logan to get the doctor while they made a bed of poles to put him on. Due to the pain caused by jolting and jarring, they carried him to his home in Smithfield. Grandmother sent for the Elders and they administered to him which made him feel much better. They applied oil with a feather because rubbing him pained terribly. Each day they did this, but he didn't seem satisfied so one day, he asked Susan to rub the oil on. He was administered to and then his back was rubbed. He felt very much better and said, "Susan, get my clothes". He then walked. Coming back to Sunnydell, it was while they were still getting the farm under way that Sidney and Annie bought a city lot in Archer near the old Briggs store. This was supposed to have been a town site. The house that was built on the lot was little improved to the one in Sunnydell, for it was a two room structure with a board floor instead of dirt. They moved into this house and stayed for a few years, the men traveling back and forth to Sunnydell to work the farm. July 1, 1885 the first boy was born to Annie and Sidney and was named, Joseph. He died the same day that he was born. May 29, 1886 another girl was born to this union named, Emily. In the year 1887, the government sent out warrants for arrests to all who were practicing polygamy. Sidney was arrested and sent to the U.S. Penitentiary at Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, with a sentence of three years. When Sidney had been in prison long enough for them to learn of his character they gave him privileges of running errands, taking the cows to pasture etc. He was tender, mixing and carrying mud and adobes for a building that they were erecting. He was a gardener and because he knew something of the cultivation of the soil and planting of seeds, he was able to raise exceptionally good cabbage. They were very surprised and couldn't understand it. He enjoyed this immensely and it was while carrying food and vegetables to the prisoners that he learned to eat and enjoy ripe tomatoes. In those days, people were very anxious to see "Mormons", coming from great distances to view the prisoners. One lady asked, Oh! Don’t Mormons have horns? I thought they were different". "We have to wait until we get older” Sidney assured her. When asked again, he said, "Here we are, judge for yourself". While there he explained the principles of the Gospel to many people who where eager to learn more about it. The Warden became interested in him and his teachings and was converted to the Gospel. Sidney was granted many special privileges because of his friendship with the Warden. While in prison Sidney had a dream. It was shown to him that he would be released. He told his guards and many of the other prisoners that on a certain date he would be released. They laughed at him. His only answer was "Wait and see". The mail came and still no pardon, then he surely was harassed, still he trusted. In the early evening, his pardon arrived. Imagine his joy and satisfaction! Instead of having to serve the three years as he was sentenced, he had been there only eighteen months. While he was in prison his first wife Susan, and his mother, both passed away. This must have been a terrible blow to him. It seems that he was truly tried and tested throughout his life. Also during his prison term, 24 January 1888 another son was born to his wife Annie who was living in Archer (the Lyman Ward at that time). The son was named Albert. Sidney was the first Bishop of the Lyman Ward and prior to that was the Presiding Elder before the ward was organized into a ward. He was made Presiding Elder in October of 1883 and June 5, 1884 he was ordained a High Priest and made Bishop of the Lyman Ward which was organized into a ward that same day. The presiding authority from Salt Lake who were officiating were President Wilford Woodruff and Apostle Heber J. Grant, with President Woodruff being mouth in the ordination of Sidney. Their meetings were held in different homes until a church house was built. This structure was erected near the Briggs Store. It was a log building, just one large room. After Sidney's return from prison in the spring of 1889, he and his family moved from Archer to their farm in Sunnydell and built another room onto the house there and put a wood floor in it, making it more comfortable. Pans were still used to catch the leaks when it rained. February 21, 1890 another girl was born to Annie and Sidney and they named her "Mabel". It was about the year of 1890 that the farming was getting under control, ditches were made around on the high ground and the grain was cut with a cradle by hand. (It was said that Sidney was an expert with the cradle.) The wheat was then gathered up by hand and tied into bundles being tied with a few of the stalks of grain. In the house heavy unbleached muslin covered with white wash was used for the wall covering. A cellar was made under the kitchen floor to store the fruits and vegetables. A trap door was used to gain entrance and this cellar served as a good hiding place for the children. There were seven more children born to Sidney and Annie during the years between 189l and 190l. Frank, born 16 October 1891, Lavon, a girl, born 1 October 1893, and another boy born 23 July 1895, two more boys, Cyril born 29 September 1896 and Clarence born 27 May 1901, also twin girls Florence and Ethel born 10 July 1898. This made the children of Annie and Sidney 14 in number. It made a total of 20 children for Sidney with the two families and a total of 16 children for Annie counting her two families, and a total of six for Susan. In the spring of 1896 a diphtheria epidemic struck and three of the older girls of Annie and Sidney were taken in death. Eunice died 28 Mar 1896 at the age of 16, Lucinda died 4 April 1896 at the age of 14 and Emily died 15 April 1896 at the age of 10. These deaths occurred in the space of 10 days. One can imagine the sorrow that might come to parents in an experience of that kind. It was said that during this experience was the first time that the family had seen Sidney break down and shed tears. This indeed was a tribute to his courage. Sidney was strict in the disciplining of his children and tried very hard to instruct them in the right way and to set them the proper example. Annie was very courageous and conscientious in the rearing of her family. She was small in stature but was very strong and worked hard as the large family demanded. They were faithful in their church activities and made the four mile trip every Sunday to the church to attend their meetings. This required the preparation for the entire day because it was impossible to come home for lunch after Sunday School and then return for Sacrament Meeting. Annie served as the first Primary President of the Lyman Ward. Sidney worked hard developing the farm and helping the older boys of his first family. They were already making homes of their own and rearing families of their own. It was in the early spring of 1909 that Sidney took sick with pneumonia and after a short illness died 4 April 1909 at his home in Sunnydell. (He was 68.) He was buried in the Archer cemetery. He left Annie with eight children at home. His first wife Susan and their son William at the age of 25 preceded him in death, also five children of his and Annie's. All of the children of his and Susan's being married with the exception of William who had passed on. Annie struggled on caring and providing for her family with the help of some of the older children. A new home was built, much more modern and larger which helped considerably. More deaths added to her heartaches. Frank died 11 February 1910 with appendicitis and pneumonia, and also not mentioned before the loss of a twin Ethel, who died shortly after birth 10 July 1898. Shortly after Frank's death, Annie developed infection in her hand that nearly cost her her life. She was in the hospital several weeks. Mabel died quite unexpectedly while at Victor, Idaho teaching school. She died 3 April 1915. Annie's joys and sorrows, of course, centered mainly around her family. She received much joy from her few grandchildren that came during her later years here in this existence. Probably one of her big thrills came when her youngest child, Clarence, was called to serve on a mission for the church. He left on his mission 7 April 1919 just short of 18 years of age. Annie was a small person, less than five feet tall but she was very energetic. She enjoyed good health until her later years when she was afflicted with high blood pressure. She was an excellent cook and housekeeper. She used to help milk cows along with the children and worked in the garden. The milk and the cream was used in making home made cheese and butter. The butter was churned and molded and some sold or exchanged for other articles. A trip to a store was seldom, usually about once a month. Annie always appeared happy though she had many sorrows, hardships and trials. Her health began to fail in the fall of 1925 and she was taken to the hospital for a while. Her daughters Florence and Jane cared for her when she returned from the hospital. In January 1926 she grew worse and passed away 24 January 1926 at the age of 68. Eight of her sixteen children and her two husbands had preceded her in death. Another daughter, Jane followed her just five days after she had passed on. Jane and her premature baby girl died 29 January 1926. It seemed quite unusual that out of the sixteen children only six were married there were twenty one grandchildren and one adopted. These people, Sidney, Susan and Annie, as all other conscientious men and women of that time are monuments to the development of the things that we enjoy today.

Sidney Weekes - 2

Colaborador: emaclodi Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

SIDNEY WEEKES Typing and proof reading --Lorin & Rennell Cook Editor --Lorin Cook Compiler --Opal Weekes Clements Sidney Weekes was born at Welling, Kent, England, March 8, 1841. He was baptized a member of the Church when a lad of eleven years. His people were aristocrats of England, owning a large estate. Such crops as were common in England, grains, hay, potatoes, fruits, animals and fowls were raised on their property. Having been inspired and converted by the Elders of the L.D.S. Church who were proclaiming the Gospel in England, Sidney's parents made the necessary preparation to come to America. They left their home in February 1853, crossing the ocean in the ship known as the "International." They arrived in New Orleans, U.S.A. in April of the same year. From there they went to Keokuk, Iowa by steamer. In this family were three boys and three girls, one of the girls and two boys having died previously in England. At this time Sidney and two of his sisters made the trip with their parents. In May they left for Salt Lake City with a company of saints. Moving slowly westward with ox teams and hand-carts, the perilous journey lasted five months. Due to severe exposure and hardships, Sidney's father became ill. He died at Fort Laramie and was buried there with perhaps a wagon tire for a marker on his grave. Years later his wife said it was perhaps a good thing. because she doubted that he had sufficient faith to endure the trials and hardships that his family suffered. Sidney's brother remained in New Orleans against his parents wishes. A few years later, he desired to move west. It was Sidney's task to move him. In order to do so, he had to have some new clothes. Among the necessary articles was a pair of pants. These, his mother made by piecing small pieces not larger than one's hand together as we do for quilt tops. When be returned in October, he had grown so tall that his trousers came almost to his knees. Grandma cried because he was so grown up. Successfully, he made this trip and others later, all by wagon and ox teams. His brother lived in Utah a number of years and then moved to Idaho. At the age of seventy years, he died at his home on the place now owned by Robert McIntyre. Sidney's mother and family moved from Salt Lake City to Lehi, because they had relatives living there. In April 1860 they moved to Smithfield, Cache County. While living in this new home, they planted a couple of crops. Each year they were utterly destroyed by crickets. The Saints tried in every way possible to destroy the insects, but in vain. Despair filled their hearts; yet they trusted in God. Flocks of sea-gull filled the sky, then down they swooped and began devouring the swarms of crickets. During this time, the faithful little mother was barely able to provide food enough for her family. My grandfather said seldom had he enough to satisfy his hunger, but that he left his in order that those younger than he should not go hungry. His mother and the younger children gleaned in the field, gathering grain wherever they could. This they threshed by hand and ground through a coffee mill into flour. They lived entirely on foods they could gather in this way and by digging tender roots and sprouts in the woods. Sidney assisted his mother in supporting the family until 1864. He then married a charming young maiden whose name was Susan Elizabeth Pilgrim. Her home was at Cambridge, England. When Susan was a little girl, her mother was quite friendly with the L.D.S. people. She began to investigate, and gave her mother a Book of Mormon as a gift. However, later in her life she became bitterly opposed to the Latter-day Saints. At one time, her youngest son, Tom, was very ill with smallpox, a disease greatly feared by all because of lack of knowledge pertaining to it. The small child grew steadily worse. Doctors gave up all hope of saving him, saying, "Death is sure to come soon." He closed his eyes as if the end were near. At his bedside stood his mother and an older sister, Rebecca, who was a member of our Church. "Mother, in our Church we have Elders who heal the sick," said the younger. "How?" asked the astonished mother. "Through faith and prayers." "Send for them quickly," said the mother. They came and administered to the child. He was healed immediately. This incident no doubt strengthened her faith, but she hadn't the necessary faith to become a member of the Church. Later, Rebecca came to America because of the Church. Elizabeth desired very much to come but her oldest sister, Mary Ann, her brothers, John and Swan ridiculed her and were very sarcastic when she mentioned it. Cheerfully, she promised to stay and care for her mother as long as she lived. She was true to her promise, though she became a member of the Church sometime before her Mother's death. Her people owned a large estate on which were an elaborate home, a vineyard and an orchard. Through the courtesy of some of her friends after her father's death, she became the supervisor of a laundry which was near one of the colleges at Cambridge. There they did student's washing. Elizabeth hired men and women to help. In addition to supervising the work, she assisted with the light work. She did the most delicate pieces of ironing and all other fine work. Her strength would not permit her to help with the washing and heavier work. In those days, they did all the rubbing by hand due to the belief that washboards wore clothes out much too soon. She worked on, saving when she could, for the desire to come to America grew stronger within her heart. Her family could have easily given her money to come, but due to their opposition towards the Church, she worked and saved. When the time came, she must have been thrilled, for she had saved much more than she needed. She shared with a couple of friends who were very anxious to come with her. They promised to repay her; regardless of this, they remained good friends. We know very little of their voyage but we do know that Elizabeth had to cross the plains in a wagon or handcart because she wasn't strong. They kept her hair thinned, but even then her body couldn't supply the necessary amount of strength to keep her well and strong. She was a little taller than medium height. Her hair and eyes were dark brown. She disliked anyone to tell her that they were black. She was very patient and gentle, yet firm. She was very fond of flowers and had a choice selection. After she reached Utah, a brother of hers who was a florist gave her plants that he had brought from England. Fuchsias and Geraniums seemed to be her favorite indoor plants. She did exceptionally fine handiwork; pieces were sent to the World's Fair and there received first place. She brought a large amount of stamped goods to be embroidered and various kinds of material to be made into clothing from England when she came. Her cooking was excellent. Possessing these virtues and graces, she appealed to Sidney, and they were married in July 16, 1864 at the Endowment House at Salt Lake City, Utah. They made their home in Smithfield. It was one of joy and happiness. They seemed to agree perfectly and were very congenial with each other. Six children, three sons: George, John and William, and three daughters Elizabeth, Rebecca, and Sarah Ann ware sent from above to bless their home. A few years after they had been married, they built a new adobe house. My grandfather carried the adobes and mortar up the scaffold to the mason. This he did during early morning and evening hours, and his farm work went on just the same. Aunt Rebecca was the first child born in this house. It may be seen in Smithfield today. They paid a strict tithing. They also made it a habit to pay for things as they purchased them. It was decided that Sidney marry another wife. His choice was a young widow whose name was Annie Harris. Her husband had been accidentally killed while hauling a load of willows. She was the mother of two small daughters. Her home was near the Weekes home. Grandmother went with them to Salt Lake City when they were married. Their marriage was for time only. While they were away, the girls made the first pair of trousers for their baby brother, William, who was three years old. Grandfather wanted a home for his second wife, also a place so his sons would have something to do and not leave home and go to Montana where many of their friends had gone. Therefore, he decided to come to Idaho. Property wasn't easily disposed of nor did they want to go, for Grandma had worked hard helping to make their home and hadn't the health and strength to start over again with nothing except the raw materials to work with. She was fifty years old and not strong, so she remained in Smithfield. Grandfather brought the two older boys, George and John also Sarah Ann along with his second wife and family to build the new home. After Grandfather and part of her family moved to Idaho, her life must have been lonely and rather discouraging at times; seeing her children taken away to live miles and miles away without a mother's love and knowing conditions of the west in those early days, realizing that they had nothing to come to except sage brush covered plains. Her disappointments and heartaches were covered with smiles. She worked as a Relief Society teacher and helped those who were old and sick continually. She had implicit faith in the principles of the Gospel. In case of illness in their home, healing was done through the power of God, not by doctors. She said often when she was ill, "Oh, if Sidney were only here to administer to me, I'd be all right." Her testimony had been strengthened greatly in this way. In the new home, Grandfather and his family toiled vigorously and unceasingly until the farm was under cultivation and a new home was built. Though the boys were only small, they too had a part to play in helping to pull the sturdy sages, clearing the land of bushes and trees, making roads that were necessary at that time. Grandfather was a very active church worker, staunch and true to his beliefs. He labored constantly in the Church, serving as Sunday School Superintendent in both Utah and Idaho. He became the first Bishop of Lyman Ward in Madison County, Idaho. He held various other positions. Often during the winter, he went back to Utah to do temple work. However, this was not until after Grandma's death. Grandpa and the boys would go down in the fall and get out enough wood to last Grandma until spring. In exchange, they brought dried fruits and vegetables back with them. It was impossible to get them here during those earlier years. While Grandpa was working in the canyon cutting out wood, someone cut down a tree. It fell so close to him that his outer clothing were torn badly and his body was very badly bruised; but his garments were as if untouched. Some of the men were sent to Logan to get the doctor while they made a bed of poles and put him on the bed. Due to the pain caused by jolting and jarring, they carried him to his home in Smithfield. Grandmother sent for the Elders. They administered to him, and he felt much better. They applied oil with a feather, because rubbing pained him terribly. Each day they did this, but he didn't seem satisfied, so one day he asked grandmother to rub the oil on. He was administered to, and then his back was rubbed. He felt very much better and said, "Susan, get my clothes." He then walked. During the terrible epidemic of diphtheria, Sidney went about administering to those who were suffering. Grandma went with him. Though both they and the children were exposed, none of them took it. Mr. Petersen had children who were ill with diphtheria. One little girl was worse than the rest. He sent for grandpa to come to his home. He said, "Brother Weekes, the doctors have given up all hopes for my daughter, can't you help us?" Grandpa told him to put the medicine away and promised him that she would be healed through faith and prayer. She was healed, and Mr. Petersen always said, "She's your girl, Brother Weekes." Grandfather had a wonderful power of healing. The sick were made to rise from their beds and walk several times after doctors had said they could not be healed. Just before he and Susan Elizabeth were married, she asked, "Sidney, do you believe polygamy to be a true principle of the Gospel?" He was young and a little timid. He lowered his eyes and hesitated just a moment, then answered, "Yes." She said, "It's a good thing. If one principle is true, then they're all true." Due to their belief and their interpretation of it, Grandpa was sent to the prison in North Dakota for three years. When he had been there long enough so they knew of his character, they gave him the privilege of running errands, taking the cows to the pasture, etc. He was tender, mixing and carrying mud and adobes for a building they were erecting. He was gardener, and because he knew something of the cultivation of the soil and planting of seeds, he was able to raise exceptionally good cabbage. They were very surprised and couldn't understand it. He enjoyed this immensely, and it was while carrying food and vegetables to the prisoners that he learned to eat and enjoy ripe tomatoes. In those days, people were very anxious to see "Mormons," coming from great distances to view the prisoners. One lady asked, "Oh, don't Mormons have horns? I thought they were different." "We have to wait until we get older," Grandpa assured her. When asked again, he said, "Here we are; judge for yourself." While there he explained the principles of the Gospel to many people who were eager to learn more about it. While he was there the folks at home were very much in need of a father. However, Grandmother was very patient, never complaining nor grieving. On and on she went until the end came in May 2, 1888 in Smithfield, Utah. She was fifty-three years of age, and her death was caused by consumption. Her father died of the same disease when she was one year old. At the time of her death, word was sent to her children, George, John and Sarah Ann, who were in Idaho. It was a shock, but after making the necessary preparations they boarded the first train going south. It happened to be a freight train, and in those days they were stopped a good deal of the time. This proved to be the case at this most urgent time. There was nothing for the anxious children to do except to wait. Unavoidable circumstances came up, and even though they had done their best, she had been buried in the Smithfield cemetery before they arrived. She died on Monday and was buried on Saturday. Sidney's mother died that same year. She had lived just next door for years. While in prison, grandpa had a dream. It was shown to him when he would be released. He told his guards and many of the other prisoners that on a certain date, he would be released; they laughed at him. His only answer was, "Wait and see." The day came; slowly the hours dragged on; no pardon came. The mail came and still no pardon; then he surely was harassed; still he trusted. In the early evening, his pardon arrived. Imagine his joy and satisfaction! Instead of having to serve the three years as he was sentenced, he had been there only eighteen months. He returned home and in a very short time did the temple work for one of his guards, Mr. Mollen and family. He surely must have suffered intense sorrow and pain at finding both his mother and his wife having departed. He returned to Idaho and here spent the remainder of his life. At the age of sixty-seven years, in 1909, he died of pneumonia, leaving his family of five children by his first wife and a second wife and fifteen children. He was buried in the cemetery at Archer, Idaho. He was known as having always been industrious and energetic, sincere to what he knew to be right. He always bore a strong testimony of the divinity of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Susan Elizabeth Pilgram

Colaborador: emaclodi Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

Susan was the youngest of ten children, born in Cambridge, England in 1835. Her father died when she was just a year old leaving her mother with 7 children to raise. As a young girl, her mother gave her a copy of the Book of Mormon and she was baptized when she was 15. A brother and sister were also baptized. Her mother Betsy had lost her husband, and now the thought of having her children leave England to come to America made her become bitter. They were scorned by family and friends. Her older sister Rebecca became an outcast so had to move out and work elsewhere. Her older brother Thomas had come to America and Rebecca also left England. Susan felt that she must stay and take care of her mother until she passed away 5 1/2 years later in 1863. After a very difficult voyage, she arrived in America and went to stay with her sister Rebecca in Lehi whom she hadn't seen in 5 1/1 years. Before long, her brother Thomas visited them from Smithfield, Utah and persuaded her to go back to Smithfield to keep house for him. Before long, both Thomas and Susan found their mates. She married Sidney Weekes and they lived in Smithfield. She had 6 children. My grandfather, John Samuel Weekes was one of their children. They were very active in the Church. Some years later, Sidney married a second wife, a neighbor with 2 young children whose husband had been killed in an accident. Sidney eventually moved to Idaho with Annie and several of the children where they could get land for farming by homesteading it. My grandfather had to leave his mother. He ran back to get something and found her crying as if it would break her heart. He never forgot that scene. Later Sidney was put in prison in North Dakota for practicing plural marriage. Before being released from prison, Susan and Sidney's mother who was her next door neighbor both passed away. She died a with a strong testimony of the Gospel and after living a life of service to many people.

Susan Elizabeth Pilgram

Colaborador: emaclodi Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

Susan was the youngest of ten children, born in Cambridge, England in 1835. Her father died when she was just a year old leaving her mother with 7 chi

Susan Elizabeth Pilgram

Colaborador: emaclodi Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

Susan was the youngest of ten children, born in Cambridge, England in 1835. Her father died when she was just a year old leaving her mother with 7 chi

Elijah Larkin and Family leave for Zion with the Cambridge Saints

Colaborador: emaclodi Created: 1 month ago Updated: 1 month ago

DIARY OF ELIJAH LARKIN (1829-1905) June 2, 1863 page 59 2nd I left home with my family & the Saints that were bound for Zion by the 7 A.M. Train for London. Several of the Saints & Friends came to see us off & bid the last Good Buy Arived at London all right. & Paid £2.1.4 Excess Luggage fine & 12, Shillings at Shadwell docks. for our Company Numbering in all. 13. Namely myself, Wife two sons, Hannah Webb, Martha Larkins, Ws & Chas Riad, Ann & Phebe Watts, Susan Pilgrim & Mary Ann Wagstaff. Our Ship the Amazon lyed in the New Barier & presented a very fine appearance. Hundreds of Saints had alreaddy arived. we got our Luggage on board as quick as Possible. Presidt Cannon then sent me in company of Sister Cook of Yarmoth to Woolwich to get if possible Sister Eliza Lyons from her Situation at a Mr Sergents who in connection with his wife had locked her up in the House & would not let he leave although she had give a Months Notive & had paid her deposit, to Emigrate by the Ship Amazon I went to the House, Mrs Seurgent came to the door, & I requested to see Sister Lyons. but was refused & then asked for Mr Sergent but she said he was not at home. & attempedted to Slose he door but finding she could not Called her Husband. & bouth comenced abuseing me & tried to close the door, but finding they could not [page burned] Sergent took hold of me to put me out from the doorway [page burned] the Stronger of the two I turned him round & sent [page burned] page 60 he then called his Lodger. A foreighener & of Gentlemanly ex[----] who also commenced abusing me. & took up a Broom to knock me down & I told him it would not be good for him to do sofor I was an Oficer, but finding I could not get into the House I left. & went to the Police Station for assistance & Stated the facts of the case but could not any. Sergert had arived before me & was lodging a complaint against me for Roughly Handling him but they ^Insptr would not take the Charge & refered us bouth to the Magistrates. who met at 5 P M Acordingly I attended made the Applycation but the Magistrates declined to assist me as I was not a Relative. Sister Cook then applyed but met the same refusal. I then sent Sister Cook to the House a -gain & Mr Sergent Seized her by the throat, knocked her down & otherwise illtreated her, but she could not get the Girl away & returned to Bro Olivers to me. quite ill from the Voilent treatment she had recieved & almost senceless after she had retoted the case Bro Oliver & myself Administered to her. & she instantly recovered & bore testimony that she had been healed by the power of God we then Started for London, & arived at the Ship at 10. P.M. were I found Sister Ruth Coe. Martha Larkins & Hannah Webb Occupieng one Berth & my Wife & Joseph another in the Steerege & Geo Wm & Chas Read & Jos Wayman in the Young Mans department at the fore part of the Ship. & the remainder of the Cambridge Saints Sisters Crist & M Lykes, on the oposite side of the Steeredge to were my people was. I then retired to rest on Ship board for the first time in my life.

Life timeline of Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim)

Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim) was born on 16 Sep 1836
Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim) was 4 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim) was 23 years old when Petroleum is discovered in Titusville, Pennsylvania leading to the world's first commercially successful oil well. Petroleum is a naturally occurring, yellow-to-black liquid found in geological formations beneath the Earth's surface. It is commonly refined into various types of fuels. Components of petroleum are separated using a technique called fractional distillation, i.e. separation of a liquid mixture into fractions differing in boiling point by means of distillation, typically using a fractionating column.
Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim) was 24 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim) was 38 years old when Winston Churchill, English colonel, journalist, and politician, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Nobel Prize laureate (d. 1965) Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill was a British politician, army officer, and writer, who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. As Prime Minister, Churchill led Britain to victory in the Second World War. Churchill represented five constituencies during his career as Member of Parliament (MP). Ideologically an economic liberal and British imperialist, he began and ended his parliamentary career as a member of the Conservative Party, which he led from 1940 to 1955, but for twenty years from 1904 he was a prominent member of the Liberal Party.
Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim) died on 1 May 1888 at the age of 51
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for Susan E Weekes (Pilgrim) (16 Sep 1836 - 1 May 1888), BillionGraves Record 983132 Smithfield, Cache, Utah, United States

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