William R. Taylor

12 Feb 1839 - 24 Mar 1912

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William R. Taylor

12 Feb 1839 - 24 Mar 1912
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The William Riley Taylor Family Written by Carol T. Floyd Granddaughter of William Riley Taylor (Submitted by Debra Young, June 2011) Margaret Jane Ellison was born 11 August 1842 in Nauvoo, Illinois a daughter of John Ellison who was born May 23, 1818 at Yorkshire, England, and Alice Pilling who wa
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William R. Taylor

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Loa Cemetery

Unnamed Rd
Loa, Wayne, Utah
United States
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toooldtohunt

May 3, 2013
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toooldtohunt

May 3, 2013

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William R. Taylor is buried in the Loa Cemetery at the location displayed on the map below. This GPS information is ONLY available at BillionGraves. Our technology can help you find the gravesite and other family members buried nearby.

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Loa Cemetery

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Unnamed Rd
Loa,Wayne,Utah
United States
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William Riley Taylor Family

Colaborador: toooldtohunt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

The William Riley Taylor Family Written by Carol T. Floyd Granddaughter of William Riley Taylor (Submitted by Debra Young, June 2011) Margaret Jane Ellison was born 11 August 1842 in Nauvoo, Illinois a daughter of John Ellison who was born May 23, 1818 at Yorkshire, England, and Alice Pilling who was born November 8, 1820 at Waddington, Yorkshire, England. Her parents came to America from England twelve days after they were married. They settled in Nauvoo where her father helped with the work on the temple, with much of the saints being asked to give a tenth of their income. Here Margaret Jane was born, the first child of a family of ten children. She was blessed by her father. After the martyrdom of Joseph Smith the troubles between the saints and the gentiles (non-Mormons) increased. On November 3, 1846 her father sold his lot and house for half the price he paid for it and the family moved to St. Louis, Missouri. Three sons were born to the family while they lived here, two of which died, victims no doubt of the epidemic summer complaints which took devastating toll of the infant population. In 1851, Margaret Jane with her parents and brother Ephraim left by steamboat for Winter Quarters. Heavy floods on the Missouri River detained them for three weeks in St. Joseph. Then they were able to continue the journey by open ferry, but it rained when they arrived and it was too late to join the company for Utah. They had to spend a winter there, making the best they could with what they had. On the 11th of June 1852, they started for Utah. Heavy articles of household furniture and implements were loaded in the wagons. Clothing, bedding, and small children were put in handcarts. On September 13th after traveling 99 days they arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in the Thomas Howell Company. The family rented a farm on the Jordan River and moved in the next day. The spring of 1853, 35 acres of wheat was planted to help feed the family and animals. The river overflowed destroying most of it. In October 1853, the family moved to Kaysville. They lived here the rest of their lives. It was in Kaysville in 1855 that Margaret Jane was baptized by John Blair, she was 13 years old at the time. It was in Kaysville that she met and eventually married William Riley Taylor. William Riley Taylor was born in Caldwell County, Missouri on February 12, 1839, the son of Allen Taylor and Sarah Louisa Allred and was the third child of the family of 11 children. William Riley lived with his parents in Caldwell County, Missouri until he was three years old, when they were driven out by the mob. They went to Nauvoo, Illinois until they were again forced to leave their home and move to Iowa. They lived in Iowa and moved toward the Rocky Mountains in the Allen Taylor Company when he was 10 years old. William Riley was the oldest son of the family, since his older brother Issac Moroni, died the year before he was born. Thus he was responsible for driving two teams of oxen across the plains by himself. The hardships were many and the Indians were very hostile at the time. The family arrived in the Salt Lake Valley late in the fall on October 15, 1849 and settled in Mill Creek Canyon. He then helped his father build a toll bridge across Mill Creek. The winter brought additional hardships some days they would only have bran bread and milk to eat. The milking was done by William Riley and one morning after milking the cows the night before, he again returned to milk and found their best milk cow of the herd dead with twelve wolves eating the carcass. The next fall they moved to Kaysville, Utah and here they again began building a log house and began to prepare for another winter. They cleared the land of brush using the oxen and a wooden hand plow they had brought across the plains with them. There was a lot of work in this new and unsettled country. Besides doing all this work they had to fight off hostile Indians to protect their homes, families and animals. Not long after they arrived in Utah, Allen Taylor, being one of Brigham Young’s trustworthy captains while crossing the plains was asked to be the new Bishop of Kaysville settlement, a position which he accepted wholeheartedly. Of course all the Taylor family would attend to their church duties every Sunday. By now William Riley was noticing pretty girls and chose a pretty but small girl with black hair and blue eyes. Her name was Margaret Jane Ellison and she too had only recently arrived in Utah on September 13, 1852. She was only 10 years old when her family crossed the plains and she also knew the hardships involved. It was just eight years after arriving in Utah that William Riley Taylor took Margaret Jane Ellison for his bride on September 27, 1857. They were married by his father, Allen Taylor, the bishop of Kaysville. The groom was 18 years old and his bride was 15. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City on June 20, 1860. This was before the Salt Lake Temple was finished, as it was started in the spring, April 6, 1853 but wasn’t completed and dedicated until April 6, 1893. It is noted that William Riley had four brothers and six sisters and Margaret Jane had six brothers and three sisters. William Riley wasn’t an educated boy as he only had two winters of schooling which lasted only six weeks each winter, so he had to work hard doing manual labor and helped his father with their farming and other work. Both he and his father spent a great deal of their time and meager means in helping build the Salt Lake Temple, and both were happy and always blessed while they were doing this. It wasn’t long after he and Margaret were married that he was called as a minute-man to go to Echo Canyon along with many other husbands and fathers to meet Johnson’s Army which was coming to Utah to destroy the Mormons. He was gone only three weeks when he met with an accident and had his elbow thrown out of place so he was released and sent back home to his young wife. Margaret Jane was a wonderful homemaker and helper to her husband, no matter what he had to do. Their little pioneer cabin with log walls, dirt floors and roof was always clean and there was always something ready to eat when William Riley came home at nights, they were very happy and content. They later moved to Sisterville (Slatterville near Far West, Weber County, Utah) where they were living when their first child was born, a boy, whom they named William Allen. He was born April 19, 1859, and then not long after this, they moved back to Kaysville and it was here that their second child another boy John Henry was born on January 4, 1861. The next year William Riley and his father Allen were asked to go with other families to what was called Dixie by Brigham Young. This place was located in the southern most part of Utah and they were to go settle that country. So they loaded their meager means and roughly made furniture in their wagons and started out on their long hard trek of 318 miles by oxen to St. George. They left their home in Kaysville on May 29, 1862, and it took them several weeks before they reached St. George encountering Indians along the way. Once again they set to work to settle the country and to prepare the ground to plant their crops in this fine productive soil. Their crops grew very abundantly the next summer in this choice warm country. The little settlement that William and Margaret settled in was called Harrisburg and it was here that their third child, another boy, was born December 24, 1862. He was named Joseph Ephraim. Before long they moved from Harrisburg to a little settlement called New Harmony, it was while they were here that the church started another temple in St. George. Again both Allen and William Riley were asked to help the building of the temple. It was started in the year of 1871 and was completed and dedicated on April 6, 1877. It was while they lived in New Harmony that two more sons joined the family, David Moroni their fourth son on March 30, 1865 and two years later their fifth son, Thomas Alvin on May 20, 1867. This made a family of five strong healthy boys. The next year in 1868 they moved back to their first home in Kaysville in Davis County, Utah. It was here, in the next year that their first girl, Sarah Alice was born on July 17, 1869. Of course they were all very happy and proud of their first little daughter and sister. Naturally Margaret took great pride in combing her long hair into braids and dressing her in her long dresses and petticoats. In 1872 they returned to the warmer climate in New Harmony, Washington County, here the next five children, all boys were born. They were James Edward the seventh child born April 2, 1872; Isaac Harvey the eight child born March 25, 1874; Charles Franklin the ninth born July 27, 1876; Loran Independence the tenth child born May 15, 1878; and the eleventh Lorenzo Jeddiah born on April 30, 1881. Of course the Taylor family was just like any other normal American family. They had their ups and downs as every one does, and they had their faith tried many times. It is said God tries the hardest those he loves the most. It was one of those sad and trying things that happened to the William Riley Taylor family when on April 11, 1877 their little son Charles Franklin died of pneumonia in St. George. The parents had not yet recovered from this shock of losing a child when the Lord again called another little spirit home to Him. This time it was their fourth child David Moroni who had been sent to the well to draw water out; he lost his balance and fell in. He drowns before help could get to him on November 29, 1878 about 17 months after the death of David who was 13 years old. These two sudden deaths in the family in less than two years was a very sad thing, but the Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away. Both William and Margaret knew that if they lived the Lord’s teachings and kept His commandments, they would some day be reunited with their loved ones when their mission in this life was finished. The next three years were very busy ones for the whole family. They were putting in their crops and taking care of their horses and cattle, and preparing to make another move. The Dixie country was fast becoming so thickly populated that Allen and Riley Taylor decided it would be best for them and their families if they moved to another locality so there would be more room for their large families and livestock. They wanted to be able to have their young sons settle close to them. So they again loaded their wagons with their belongings and moved. The older boys drove the cattle, sheep and horses as they migrated from New Harmony to what was then known as Rabbit Valley. They arrived here on the 11th of November 1881. William Riley bought the first large tract of land just as you enter the valley, which later was known by the name of Road Creek. Because it was late in the year when they arrived, the feed for the animals was scarce. They had to obtain some feed from their good neighbors in the little settlement of Fremont just north of Road Creek. By doing this and herding their animals on the hills most of the winter, they managed to survive the hard winter. Early spring of 1882 found all of the boys and Riley out grubbing brush, which was as tall as a horse and hauling the many rocks off so they could start plowing the ground for the spring crops. It was a very hard and tiresome job all day long. But when Sunday morning came, Riley and Margaret would be in their white top buggy on their way to Fremont to attend to their church duties. Their youngest son Ren (Lorenzo) liked to ride horses very much and insisted on riding his horse instead of in the buggy with the rest of the family. He said that it made him sick to his stomach because of the swaying of the buggy. Margaret became the first primary president of the new ward of Fremont, which was organized in the year of 1883. This new responsibility and her large family kept her very busy. William riley received all the ordinations to the priesthood, Deacon, Teacher, Priest, and Elder, but all dates and places have been lost. He was ordained a seventy in February 1856. He was later ordained a High Priest on May 30, 1897 by Apostle Francis L. Lyman at Loa. It was in the your of 1883 on July 21st that another of the Lord’s choice spirits was sent to William and Margaret and of course it was another son. This was their twelfth son and he was named Heber Calvert and was born in Fremont. Then about two years later the Lord again sent them another son, he was born on May 29, 1885, he was named George Irvin and was their thirteenth child. On June 4, 1887 they were once again blessed with the arrival of a new baby and you can imagine their joy when this baby was another little girl. She was named Susannah Janet and was the fourteenth and last child of this large and happy family of twelve boys and two girls. The girls always said they each had twelve big brothers to tease them but to William and Margaret they were fourteen of God’s choicest spirits that they had been permitted to have and to teach and of course they were very proud and happy about them. After the Loa ward was organized the Taylor family joined it as it was closer to their farm on Road Creek. Then in later years, Riley bought a couple of city blocks in Loa and built a couple of two roomed housed on them. The family then moved into Loa but Riley and the boys still went to Road Creek each day to do their farming. It had been quite a while since Margaret had been to Kaysville to see her parents, brothers and sisters so Riley decided she needed to have a rest and a good visit. So they put what they would need for a trip in the buggy and with their four youngest children Ren, Heber, George, and Susannah they went to Kaysville. This was quite an experience for these children as the train had come to Utah. They were going around the mountain just before entering the Salt Lake Valley when a train caught up with them. It scared the horses and they would have run away if Riley hadn’t put on his brake and held to the reins as tight as he could with both hands. This was the first time both the children and the horses had ever encountered a train. They stayed in Kaysville a couple weeks visiting and enjoying the company of relatives and old friends whom they hadn’t seen for a long time. When they were ready to come home Uncle Matthew Ellison, Margaret’s brother gave Riley a pure bred buck ram to take with them. They made a box of wood and fastened it on the end gate of the wagon and put the ram in it to make the long journey back to their home in Loa. Of course the boys did a lot of walking and when they came to a grassy place they would pull grass and feed it to the ram. They had to camp along the road wherever night over took them. Later when George was 13 years old, Riley built his family another new and much larger rock house on the east end of the block where the old log houses had been. It was made of large rocks that had been quarried out of the mountains. A couple of rock masons by the name of Anderson built it, but the boys had to be the mud mixers. This new home had six rooms, three upstairs and three downstairs and also a bathroom. Margaret enjoyed this larger and nicer home because of her large family. This house was very well built as it is still standing and being used today by a grandson and his family. It was quite a hard task for Riley and his sons to be building a house and trying to put in their crops at the same time. So before long they sold Road Creek and bought a farm about two miles north east of Loa which is called Spring Creek. They bought this tract of land from a fellow by the name of Wilford Pace. This made it much better but it was still a long hard day by the time they drove their teams and wagons from Loa to the farm and did all the plowing with a hand plow. They usually plowed about an acre in one day and then rushed home to do their chores before dark. William’s half sister Louisa Taylor who later married Heber Blackburn, came and helped Margaret quite a lot and she was also helpful in the ward organizations. When Riley and the boys came in, their supper of hot biscuits, potatoes, gravy, and meat was always ready and waiting for them even though Margaret was a very busy woman. Besides all her housework and big family to take care of she was busy working in the different organizations such as a counselor in the Relief Society to Sister Bathsheba Grundy. Then later she was asked to be the president of the Loa Ward Relief Society a position she held for a number of years. This office took quite a lot of her time, for in those days when there was a death in a family the Relief Society always had to prepare the body for burial and sew the clothes for burial. She was also a great help among the sick. She was a midwife in Loa for a good long time and she assisted in bringing unnumbered babies into this world. There weren’t any doctors in those days in Loa, and the people had to rely on Patriarch Blackburn for most everything. Margaret was called from her house many nights to go and assist a neighbor and attend to the sick, but at the same time, she never neglected Riley and their family. They always had plenty of cooked food and clean patched clothes to wear even though she had to do her washing on an old wooden washer which the boys would all take turns turning for her. She made all of the soap she used for her washing which included clothes, lots of little dirty faces, and dirty dishes. She would heat her iron on the old coal stove to iron their clothes. From the sheep that Riley sheared, came the wool that Margaret made into clothes for the family. She did this by washing and spinning the wool into thread and then weaving the cloth on her loom or knitting. She would also churn butter, make bread and cheese for her family and sold the extra to the neighbors. Some was sent to Salt Lake to help those that were working on the Temple. The Taylor’s were blessed with a good living with their sheep, cattle and what they raised in their garden. At one time, William Riley owned more wild horses than any other man in the country, but none of them were used to herd their sheep. The boys helped with the sheep, always walking sometimes barefoot. They always had some very good sheep dogs which would do a lot of the work. They would winter the sheep south of Road Creek, then in the early spring they would take them up on Thousand Lake Mountain to what was known as Riley’s Spring. Here the sheep were sheared and lambing occurred here. After lambing, they were driven back over the north mountain, over the north end of Johnson Valley Reservoir, then out to Parker Mountain and eventually back to Road Creek again for the winter. This they would do every summer and someone had to be with the sheep all the time. There were many coyotes, mountain lions, and even bears which would steal a sheep or lamb every chance they got. The older boys and Riley would take turns herding them and sometimes the younger boys would help too. One time while Loran and Heber were up above Forsythe Reservoir, Loran sent Heber and the dog up around the sheep. When Heber came back, the dog wasn’t with him, so Loran asked him where the dog was. He said a big cat had killed the dog. When Loran went up there he was shocked to find the dog so badly hurt by a mountain lion that he had to kill the poor dog to get it out of its misery. That taught Loran a lesson he never forgot and he never sent one of the little boys to herd the sheep by themselves again. There were quite a few Indians in the valley, but they weren’t very mean. Riley always said it was cheaper to feed the Indians than it was to fight them. However there was one time he became very angry with them. One night there were several Indians that came to the house with several nice big wool fleeces and wanted him to buy them. So he gave them some food for the wool. A few days later to his surprise he found five of his sheep without any wool. The Indians had pulled all of the wool off and sold it to him. Of course there is always something good in everything; at least that was five sheep he didn’t need to shear that spring. All strangers were always welcome in their home and many nights Margaret would make beds all over the place for some one to sleep. One time an old fellow came and wanted something to eat and a place to sleep. So Margaret sent him a loaf of bread and a pan of milk. He ate as though he hadn’t had anything to eat for a week or more. When he finished he wanted more. They then took him out to the granary and fixed a place for him to sleep. When they went out to get him to come for breakfast the next morning they found the poor fellow dead. Riley thought that he had gone without anything to eat for so long that he had over eaten. The boys were all horse riders, especially when it came to riding wild ones. The more they would buck the more they enjoyed it. It seemed like that was the way the boys rested after a hard days work into the field. In the fall they would cut grain with a scythe, and then the older boys would come along gather it into bundles and tie it with straw then collect it later for the thrashers. The thrashers were horse drawn and they got their power by hitching up six teams of horses and driving them around in a circle. This worked something like an old coffee mill. But it could thrash as fast as two men could pitch it into the thrasher. They could thrash about a thousand bushels a day. They would start as soon as it was light enough to see and work until way after dark. Later a fellow by the name of George Chapple (Chappell) bought a steam thresher and brought it into the valley. Their lights weren’t as good then as we have them now. At first they used what was called a *****. This was made by soaking a rag in mutton tallow or other kind of grease. This was put in a dish and fire made on the exposed end. This gave off plenty of black smoke which blackened up the house. Later they used candles which they made themselves but mostly the fireplace was their old stand by for both heat and light. After the coal oil lamps were invented, they really thought they had a wonderful convenient and bright light. When the pioneers first came to Rabbit Valley their water supply wasn’t very good. They hauled it in barrels from Spring Creek for the house use. Then after this they made ditches and ran it to the different places for use in the house and to water the animals. But they began to worry for fear of it becoming contaminated with all the animals drinking in the ditches. It was in the year 1911 that the town of Loa bought an eight acre stream of water out to Road Creek from Riley Taylor and it was piped into town. This was really a blessed day for all the people of Loa when they could just turn on their taps and have water in their own houses, good clean, fresh water that they didn’t have to worry about being contaminated. William Riley was called to act as counselor in the Bishopric of the Loa Ward in May 1897 a capacity he held for a long time. Riley and Margaret went to Salt Lake a number of times to do Temple work. At first they had to go by wagon, then in later years they would go to Salina and then go on from there on the train. This was a very enjoyable trip compared to the trip in the wagon. William Riley was a very friendly man and was always making friends with someone. If he met a stranger he would always go up to him and shake hands, tell him who he was and ask the stranger what his name was. He would never do anything to hurt anyone’s feelings. If he knew he had he would go and ask their forgiveness before the sun would go down. Even the little folks of the town would come and visit him and Margaret and have some of her delicious home-made bread and butter and listen to the exciting stories that William Riley always had to tell. If there was a marble game in the middle of the road, he always had time to stop and join the boys for a game or two, and he always enjoyed it as much as the boys did. After he had told them stories and played marbles with them he always had to tease them awhile. Margaret always told him he was just a big over-grown boy. But they always enjoyed it and came back for more. He was always loved by everyone that met him. On March 17, 1890 another one of their sons James Edward died of diphtheria at Fremont and was buried in the Fremont Cemetery. It seemed that when trouble strikes it usually strikes twice and it was a little more than a year later on August 13, 1891 when their son Thomas Alvin was out watering his field when he was struck and killed by lightening. His wife Hannah waited supper on him until way after dark, and then when he didn’t come she went to find him. He left a wife, a small son David Alvin, a little daughter Margaret Ellen, and a third son, Thomas Albert that was born a while after his father was killed. Four of Riley and Margaret’s boys served missions. William Allen on a two year mission to England, and Isaac Harvey on a one year Improvement Era mission in Davis County, Utah. Loran Independence went to the North Western States on a two year mission from May 5, 1889 to October 6, 1900, and Lorenzo Jeddiah served on a two year mission to Great Britain from August 2, 1901 to October 3, 1903. After Lorenzo returned he acted as Bishop of the Loa ward for a number of years. After their son Harvey’s wife died, leaving a baby daughter, Riley and Margaret took her and raised her as their own. This girl Zona, lived with them until they both passed away. All of their children who married were sealed to their companions in the various temples. Five of their sons and one daughter had the misfortune of loosing their companions and were married a second time. Their oldest son William Allen lived in polygamy and had a very large family. He was the father of 22 children. Five of their children had nine children in their own families. William Riley was faithful to the end attending to his wife and to all of his church duties until at the age of 73 he passed away at his home in Loa of an enlarged heart on March 24, 1912 and was buried in the Loa Cemetery on March 27, 1912. Margaret still carried on helping the poor and the sick as long as her health would permit until she passed away at her home in Loa of urine poison at the age of 83 on August 25, 1925. She was buried in the Loa Cemetery on August 27, 1925. At the time of her death she and Riley had 121 grandchildren, but now no one has any idea what their descendants would number. No doubt it would be in the thousands. Both of these faithful pioneers lived a long and useful life in helping to build the many different communities in which they lived, helped their friends and neighbors when they were in need, and served the Lord faithfully to the end. How great will be their reward when He says to both of them “Well done my good and faithful servants enter into my joy and sit down upon my throne.” I am sure that they have inherited the highest degree in the Celestial Kingdom. They both received their Patriarchal blessings, William Riley on April 14, 1910 by John Taylor, and Margaret on September 28, 1901 by Elias Hicks Blackburn. As of today, July 6, 1966, there is only one member of this large family left. He is the youngest son, George Irvin, who was 81 years old on May 29, 1966. The Old Rock House The old rock house stands tall and bleak Against the sky For it scarce can tell the story of so Many years gone by A broken fence, the weeds grown tall Amid a dozen trees Yet the black and white rock home stands proud It has known better days than these Now strangers may point with scorn and Remark that its afright But we who know, see beauty amid are Humbled by its sight Many came to visit, many came to stay And they added to its good record before They moved or passed away I recall how my heart skipped a beat And oh how we would squeal Just spotting that house when we finally Topped the hill. There were times when laughter rocked The walls and little children sang With family reunions, love at home, And bells on Christmas rang Times they gathered around the table And knelt before their chair Thus rising early every morning they Offered family prayer Hot irons wrapped in towels, tucked in bed To warm us from the cold The whittling and singing and stories Granddad told The farm fresh milk with home made Bread that Grandma used to bake The gooseberry pie and hollyhock dolls She showed me how to make No enemies ever left this house nor Stranger entered in This house holds stories of compassion And charity within The hungry fed, the poor was clothed The lonely found a friend Their test of faith was giving and They were faithful to the end Now the worn rock stoop is a marker Of days, that could not last And recall to us sweet memories and Silent yearnings for the past. Carol T. Floyd - Granddaughter of William Riley Taylor, The Builder of The Old Rock House

Allen Taylor, Pioneer, Father, Grandfather

Colaborador: toooldtohunt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Biography by Juanita Kossen taken from website ********************************************* January 17, 1984 marked the 170th anniversary of the arrival of a baby son at the home of William and Elizabeth Paterick Taylor, in Bowling Green, Warren County, Kentucky. Their second baby and a son whom they named Allen. To this union were born twelve more children to make their family circle number 16. What a great blessing to be born of good, strong and hard working family. Both of his parents became sincere, devout members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. William Taylor, Allen's father, died 9 Sep 1839, leaving a family of 14 children, seven sons and seven daughters. Their names were: John, Joseph, Allen, Pleasant Green, Julia Ann, William Warren, Mary Ann, Levi, Louisa, Nancy Jane, Elizabeth Ann, Amanda Malvina, Sarah, James C. There is no mention of Allen Taylor's childhood or in-between years before maturity. Yet in my mind's eye I visualize him a fast and hard worker, accepting and sharing the heavy load of responsibility in such a large family. His father would surely need help with 12 children younger than he. His father had 16 to provide for and he was a good provider. After his father died he would have more responsibility to help his widowed mother as well as having a wife and children of his own.At this point of time Allen Taylor was closely associated with the Prophet Joseph Smith, Jr. From the brief life sketch by Lelia Marler Hogan we read about this association: Loyalty was one of the predominant characteristics of that courageous soul, Allen Taylor. Name all the gifts committed to man and find one if you can that supersedes that of loyalty. The Savior of the world esteemed it as one of the crowning gifts from heaven. As John, the Beloved was to our Savior, so was Allen Taylor to the Prophet Joseph Smith. No task so great with seeming insurmountable barriers to daunt the energies of our beloved progenitor in undertaking to surmount them if so requested by the Prophet of the 19th century. Joseph Smith loved Allen Taylor and to him entrusted many important errands On that memorable day when so many were so ruthlessly slain in Hauns Mill. Allen Taylor was commissioned by the Prophet to mount a horse and notify the saints who lived at a distance from Far West to move into town immediately. How oft by day and by night he guarded the Prophet's home, while the Prophet slumbered with the peace of heaven upon him and with no more concern than if he had not a foe in all the world. How oft he did it is not of so much importance as how well and how faithfully he did it. Did his eyes ever close in dull sleep? Or his nerves fail him while to him had been entrusted so sacred a duty? (or a duty fraught with so many possible consequences?) No, never!! When given a position of trust he was as loyal to it as the Angels who guard the gates of pearls upon the Golden Shore. And why not? Was he not guarding one of the most precious souls ever commited to earth? Only one ever superseded him in worth to the children of men since the days of Adam. As descendants of Allen Taylor let it be unto us a source of exquisite joy and profound happiness that our ancestor never slept, never failed when so sacred a trust was placed upon him. Like wolves in the underbrush, blood-thirsty men prowled about in the stillness of the dark, seeking an opportunity to deliver the tarnished kiss of betrayal or to shoot the leaden, poisoned missile that would stop the heartbeat of our Prophet for all of mortal time. As Allen Taylor was to the Prophet Joseph Smith so also was he to President Brigham Young. Upon the plains and through the mountains he moved with such indomitable courage and gallantry of heart, he could most appropriatly be placed in a class with that illustrious and generous hearted pioneer, who died upon the open plains, William Taylor, father of Allen. One granddaughter, Sarah Elizabeth Redd Prince Davis, related the following: "A huge drunken man stumbled into a meeting where the Prophet was speaking. The man interrupted by using foul language which became louder and louder with insults. He shouted that he was a better man than the Prophet and would show everyone. He loudly challenged the Prophet to a wrestling match. At first the Prophet tried to ignore the man, but as the insults became louder and more abusive, Pres. Smith turned to one of his companions, Allen Taylor, and said, "Allen, come up and throw this man." "The drunk was tall and looked like a heavy-weight wrestler and he strutted up to the front of the meeting to show off his superior ability. His opponent was a short, light-weight man. Allen did not hesitate, he felt sure he could do what the Prophet had asked of him. He immediately tackled his opponent, threw him, and pinned him to the floor. Defeated, the bully got to his feet and made a fast exit." Under the direction and organization of President Brigham Young, Allen Taylor was given. immediate command of 100 families together with 100 each for Lorenzo Snow, William G. Perkins and Zera Pulsipher. Captain Allen Taylor's company consisted of: Wagons---190; Pigs-66; Souls--597; Chickens--282; Horses--30; Cats--19; Mules--16; Dogs--31; Oxen-615; Goats--3; Cows--316; Geese-8; Loose Cattle--63; Doves--6; Sheep--134 The history of the old trail alone forms a dramatic story in the history of the West. It must be remembered that the Pioneers were always in Indian country. It was imperative that a guard keep careful watch every night for the fear that the camp might he way-laid and people massacred. We were invaders on their territory as far as they were concerned. Allen Taylor had married in Kentucky on 5 Sep 1833, Sarah Louisa Allred (born 14 Nov 1817 in Kentucky; daughter of Isaac and Mary (Calvert) Allred) and they were the parents of six children when the family made the decision to move west with the body of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. These children were: Isaac, Mark Elizabeth, William Riley, Sara Jane, Joseph Allen and Nancy Elvina. When the first great body of saints reached Fort Bridger, Wyoming, Sarah gave birth to her seventh child, Claaissa Elvira Taylor on 3 Oct 1349 (This baby was my grandmother and I know that some time, somewheere I shall personally thank my dear great-grandmother, Sarah Louisa Allred Taylor for carrying my grandmother from Winter Quarters, for sharing the great hardships with the other 596 souls in 190 wagons as they plodded across the plains and the mountains--for the great love of the Gospel of Jesus Christ they passed on to posterity.)1 Allen and Sarah had four more children, Orrisa Angela, Independence, Jedediah and Louisa Jennett.2 Besides his own family in the Company he Captained, his mother, Elizabeth (Patrick) Taylor with thirteen of her children were present. They arrived in The Great Salt Lake Valley on 15 Oct 1849. Immediately after Captain Taylor arrived in the Salt Lake Valley, President Brigham Young commissioned him to brave the trails just completed and challenge the coming winter and return to Winter Quarters to deliver the great sum of $500.00 to some of the migrating church members who were in very humble circumstances and who must stay in the east and journey westward in the sprung. Allen strapped the money tightly against his body to minimize detection then made the return journey by horseback. He was a brave and loyal man and met the challenge well and completed the responsibility given him. He returned to Utah and his family as soon as possible. His mother, Elizabeth Patrick Taylor, made her first home in Kaysville, Utah but lived her last years with a son, Pleasant Green Taylor, in Harrisviile Utah. She died 25 Oct 1880. She was true to the memory of her husband and remained faithful to the Church. She felt the Church was a "staff for her hand and a light to her path through all the years." (quote from Life Sketch by Lelia Marler Hogan) He was later called and set apart as Bishop of Kaysville Ward which position he faithfully and untiringly labored for eight years. Allen's entire life had been one of devotion, first to his families, second to humanity, and always to God and his purposes. He was the proud husband of four wives and fathered thirty children. He was called to make a second great sacrifice, both financially and personally to migrate to Dixie Country. He was the owner of splendid property, a good home and other real estate, with a nice start on livestock (sheep and cattle) in what was and is a choice section of the State of Utah. Loyalty and obedience was again manifested. He disposed of his possessions in Northern. Utah and pioneered Southern Utah, which in the beginning was very uninviting with a very meager and scant amount of farming land to be brought under subjection. Very true, climactic conditions were favorable for many verities of fruits. This industry, however, is carried on by very small tracts of land. Allen Taylor was also a very liberal and frequent donor to the St. George Temple and was asked by President Brigham Young to build a large residence that the people would have a more hopeful incentive to follow and thereby become established. This part of the State of Utah was known for the very small tracts of land builded by the early pioneers, This was the case for Allen and so his sons were obliged to hunt other locations where they could pursue the farming industry. Again in 1883, Allen thought it necessary to make another move and so he homesteaded 160 acres of land in Loa, Utah. Captain Allen Taylor life's record was closed 5 Dec 1891 in Loa, Wayne, Utah, having been a loving son, husband, father and grandfather. He was a loyal and good servant to his fellowmen; loved ones and to his Church and God whom he served unreservably. Here was a man who suffered much -- both joy and sorrow; hardship and comfort. A man who participated in the expansion of a nation; the building of people and establishing a firm foundation for many families. flow thrilling it had to be on that eventful day of 15 Oct 1849 when they (the Saints) reached the summit and the majestic towering mountains bid them welcome home. Below was the beginning of a new life of freedom for them. A sweet homeland. Surrounded by these rugged mountains surely inspired G. W. Penrose to write words that can describe Allen Taylor's love of the west also: "0 Yet Mountains High where the clear blue sky arches over the vale of the free. Where the pure breezes blow and the clear streamlets flow. How I've longed to your bosom to flee! O Zion! dear Zion, land of the free. Now my own mountain home unto thee I have come. All my fond hopes are centered in thee." (pg. 145, LDS Hymn Book) Yet another song's words can describe this pioneer's efforts and accomplishments: "...they were honest, serving God who bro't them thro'. Nice log houses did they build, with large families they were fill'd. Oh, they surely builded better than they knew!" (pg 158, Pioneer Songs, Dau. Utah Pioneers) (contd) in sstory two by Juanita Kossen

Memorial / Obituário / História Pessoal

Colaborador: toooldtohunt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

Margaret Jane Ellison was born August 11, 1842 at Nauvoo, Illinois, a daughter of John Ellison who was born May 23, 1818 at Yorkshire England, and Alice Pilling who was born November 8, 1820 at Waddington, Yorkshire, England. Her parents came to America from England twelve days after they were married. They settled in Nauvoo where her father helped with the work on the temple, with each of the saints being asked to give a tenth of their income. Here Margaret Jane was born, the first child of a family of ten children. She was blessed by her father. After the martydom of Joseph Sthith the troubled between the saints and the gentiles increased. On Nova/11er 3, 1646 her father sold his lot and house for half price he paid for it and the family moved to St. Louis, Missouri. Three sons were born to the family while they lived here, two of which died, victims no doubt of the epidemic summer complaints which took devastating toll of the infant population. In 1851, Margaret Jane with her parents end brother Ephraim left by steamboat for Winter Quarters. Heavy floods on the Missouri River datained them for three weeks at St. Joseph. When they were able to continue the journey by open ferry, it rained every day for ton days which was how long it took them to reach Winter Quarters. When they arrived it was too late to join the company for Utah and they had to spend a winter there, making the best they could. with what they had. On the 11th of June, 1852, they started for Utah. Heavy articles of house- hold furniture and implements were loaded in the wagons. Clothing, bedding and small children were put in handcarts. On September 13th, after traveling 99 days, they arrived in the Salt Lake Valley in the Thomas Howell Company. The family rented a farm on the Jordan River and moved in the next day. The spring of 1853, 35 acres of wheat were planted to help feed the family and animals. The river overflowed, destroying most of it. Another brother was born here in the spring. In October 1853, the family moved to Kaysville. They lived here the rest of their lives. It was in Kaysville in 1855 on March 8th that Margaret Jane was baptised by John Blair. There is no other record of a baptism for her, she being 13 pears old at this time. It was in Kaysville that she met and eventually married William Riley Taylor. William Riley Taylor was born in Caldwell County, Missouri on February 12, 1839, a son of Allen Taylor who was born on January 17, 1814 at Bowling Green, Kentucky, and Sarah Louise Allred who was born on November 4, 1817 at Bedford County, Tennessee. He was the third child of a family of 11 children. His father was a poligamist and had 4 wives, Sarah Louise Allred being the first.

HISTORY OF JOHN HENRY TAYLOR

Colaborador: toooldtohunt Created: 1 year ago Updated: 1 year ago

John Henry Taylor, was born to William Riley Taylor and Margaret Jane Ellison, at Kayesville, Davis County, Utah, 4th January 1861. Johns, Father, William Riley Taylor, came to the great Salt Lake Valley , in his tenth year, with his father, Allen Taylor, Allen being captain of the Allen Taylor Company of the saints. This company arrived in the Valley on the 15th of October 1849. The family first settled at the mouth of Mill Creek Canyon and in 1850, the family moved to Kayesville, Utah Sept. 27, 1857, in his 18th year, William Riley Taylor married Margaret Jane Ellison, daughter of John Ellison and Alice Pilling, Pioneers of 1852. On the 19th April 1859, Margaret gave birth to their first child, a son, William Allen, and on the 4th of January 1861, John Henry was born to this young couple. In the spring of 1862, Allen Taylor was called by President Brigham Young, to go south and help settle the Dixie Country, with the privilege to call and take his married sons and daughters with him. So on the 20th of May 1862, the Allen Taylor family again left their homes in Weber and Davis Counties, settling at New Harmony, Washington County, arriving there on the 12th of July 1862.. Some of the incidents and events of John's life while growing up are many as is common to all in pioneering wild territory. On one instance, John and his older brother, Willie as he was called, were watching their father plow the field, getting ready for planting. John, pushing his hands down deep into the pockets of his jeans, twisted himself around and said: "Haint them bully horses Wooly?" At one time, Johns' father was going out to look for horses on the mountain. John wanted to go very much, so his mother fixed a lunch and tied it in a cloth and to the saddle. As they rode along through the trees, they lost the lunch, the first time, John's father helped find it but the second time they lost the lunch, His father sent John back to look for it and told him to sit on a big log by the side of the road and wait for this father to come back that way for the boy. John, not finding the lunch and fearing his father had forgotten him, started up the road. He stubbed his big toe on a rock, it knocked the nail off. He found a big dry tree that had fallen, he climbed as high up as he could, "So a big Bear couldn't get him." When John was about fourteen years old, he went with his grandfather, Allen Taylor, to help make up his molasses. Young John had been away from home about three weeks and was very home sick. His grandfather told him that he couldn't leave his work to take John home for another week. John was homesick and said he was going home, a distance of thirty five miles. The boy started out on foot. At night he stayed with an old couple who knew John's grandfather. They were very nice and made John as comfortable as they would have one of their own. The next morning, as soon as it was light, the young boy was up. (he slept with his boots on.) The old lady wanted to fix him some breakfast but he said "No thank you, I will go" He had walked about an hour when an Indian boy came along in a wagon and gave John a ride. He arrived home just as his father and brothers were going to the fields to work. He was a very happy lad to be home again. He was always a great home body, even after he was married, he always wanted to be home. Nine of William Rileys and Margarets children were born in New Harmony, one in Ogden, one is Kaysville and three were born in Fremont Wayne County. The Taylor Families were released from their mission in the Dixie Country and after nineteen years in Dixie, they moved their families into more desolate country to pioneer and help develope. John was in the twenth year when the family moved from Dixie into the Wayne County area. It was a short time after these families had arrive in Wayne County, that young John meet and married August Elizabeth Stevens, daughter of Henry Stevens and Augusta Dorius. John and Augusta were married on May 15th 1883 and on the 2nd of January 1884, they went to the Manti Temple and were sealed to each other for time and eternity. During their early life, young John was loading his gun and it discharged, shooting the thumb of his right hand off. He had lost a considerable amount of blood and was in serious condition, before they could get him to a doctor. A short time later in a church gathering, one of the brothern was giving the prayer. In the prayer he asked a blessing for "John Taylor, he said". "I don't mean President John Taylor, I mean on Thumb John Taylor. On the 7th of February 1884, Augusta gave birth to a pair of twins, a boy William Henry and Margaret Augusta. In due time these young people and more babies come to their home. Crilla Janet, 16th May 1886, Laura Alice, 8th April 1888, James Eldon 8th May 1890, (James Eldon only lived one year, dying on the 29th May 1891 and was buried in the Fremont Wayne Cemetary). Their last child, Mary Jane was born the 15th October 1892. All these babies were born in Fremont. During these years and the few short years to follow, John and Augusta went through the many hardships of pioneer life, but they were always faithful and God fearing people and taught their children the best they could under the handy caps that existed during these early years. It was in 1893 and 1894 years of the great Diptheria epedemic struck many communities in the country and Wayne county wan't and different. In the spring of 1894, the dreaded disease hit John's little family and on the 7th of May 1894, the young wife and mother died. On the 10th of the same month 1894, just three days after the mother died, little Mary Jane died. five days later, on the 15th of May 1894, Margaret Augusta passed away. Thus the young father lost his young wife and two children with a weeks time, leaving three young motherless children for John to care for. Under these trying conditions, it would be hard to believe that the Saints could remain true and faithful to their convictions and still have a testimony of the gospel. John did remain faithful and some two years later he meet and married Allie Young, daughter of Franklin Wheeler Young and Nancy Leonora Greene, on the 24th of June 1896 in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, Utah. It was a big step for both young people. Allie had been married to James Tickner Woods and she had a baby daughter to care form along with John's young children. There were many responsibilities and many hardships to endure. After this marriage, these young people made their home in Fremont, Wayne County, located four miles north of Loa, Utah. Here five of their eight children were born. John Moroni, 28th June 1897, Nancy, 1st August 1898, and only lived a few hours, she was buried in Fremont Cemetary. Aroet Franklin, 4th Feb. 1900, Lorenzo Independence, 19th April 1901, Eva Vivian 15 Sept. 1902. After the birth of Eva, the family moved to Huntington, Emery County, to make their home. After arriving in their new home Alma Ellison was born on the 3rd of January 1904, Orissia Susannah, 27th Sept., 1905, and Leonora Jane 25th Sept., 1907. Crilla, his daughter from his first wife, Augusta, died from child birth, in 1909 in Huntington, Utah. The home in Huntington was a two story house made of sawed logs. One room up stairs and one room down stairs with a lean too on the west for a kitchen. The boys slept up stairs. There were a big row of shade trees on the south side of the house, the water used was from a ditch about one hundred yards from the house. There was a row of shade trees on the north of the ditch. The orchard was south of this ditch, and there was a good variety of fruit trees that furnished the family with all the fruit need for bottling. North of the house was a big pond used for storing water. There was a barn west of the house where they stored hay for the livestock. A couple of years after moveing to Huntington, John took his family back to Fremont, and bought some cattle and sheep and the three oldest boys, John M, Aroet, and Ren, drove the cattle eighty five miles back to Huntington. Allie helped to drive the team and wagons and John helped the boys. A few years after moving to Huntington, the black leg disease hit the cattle in this area and there was no cure for it. The cattle died like flies. The farmers would pile the cattle in big piles and burn them to keep the disease from spreading. It was only a short time until Johns cattle were completely wiped out. Then to make matters worse, the land began to go water logged. the farmers would dig deep trenches to try to drain the water off the land but to no avail. In the spring of 1910, John and his wife traded his farm for a team harness, and white top buggy and loaded their few last belongings with their children and went back to Loa, Wayne County. There were many hardships on the way back. A short time after arriving back in Loa, their fifth child, Eva, became seriously ill and on the 7th of January 1914, she died and was buried in Loa. John was always a hard worker and honesty was one of his many great virtures. It was sometime about the spring of 1915 that John moved his family to Delta, hoping to make a new life, but he could never get ahead of the great loss in Emery Co. It was during this time that the baby daughter Allie had from he first marriage, Pearl (who had grown to a lovely young lady and was married with three young children of her own, having lost her oldest child soon after birth), Pearl was seriously ill, so Allie took her three youngest children and went to Pearl's home in Fairview to help care for Pearl's children while she sent to Salt Lake City for treatment. Pearl died the 25th June 1915 and was buried in Fairview the 28th June 1915. In 1917 John's and Allie's second son, Aroet enlisted in the first world war, and went over seas to help defend his country. It was a great worry to these people to see their young son go so far away from home under such conditions. There was happiness and good time and sorrow and heartache, but John remained true to his faith and often said that he certainly had a testimony of this church and that if he didn't think there was a here after and that our church wasn't true, he would surely live this old life up fast. John was always teaching love and respect to his children and was always a good husband and father. He begun to have sick spells, Prostate trouble but he always said if he ever went to a hospital, he would die. On the 30th of April 1934, at the age of 73 years and 3 months, John passed away in Hinckley, Utah, after suffering many many months with cancer of the postate glands. He was buried of the 3rd of May 1934 at Fremont, Wayne County, along side of his first love and the little family that he lost so very sudden.

Life timeline of William R. Taylor

1839
William R. Taylor was born on 12 Feb 1839
William R. Taylor was 1 years old when Samuel Morse receives the patent for the telegraph. Samuel Finley Breese Morse was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.
William R. Taylor was 21 years old when Charles Darwin publishes On the Origin of Species. Charles Robert Darwin, was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. He established that all species of life have descended over time from common ancestors and, in a joint publication with Alfred Russel Wallace, introduced his scientific theory that this branching pattern of evolution resulted from a process that he called natural selection, in which the struggle for existence has a similar effect to the artificial selection involved in selective breeding.
William R. Taylor was 22 years old when Abraham Lincoln is elected as the 16th President of United States. Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th President of the United States from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through the American Civil War—its bloodiest war and perhaps its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy.
William R. Taylor was 41 years old when Thomas Edison demonstrates incandescent lighting to the public for the first time, in Menlo Park, New Jersey. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
William R. Taylor was 45 years old when Eruption of Krakatoa: Four enormous explosions destroy the island of Krakatoa and cause years of climate change. The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies began in the afternoon of Sunday, 26 August 1883, and peaked in the late morning of Monday, 27 August when over 70% of the island and its surrounding archipelago were destroyed as it collapsed into a caldera. Additional seismic activity was reported to have continued until February 1884, though reports of seismic activity after October 1883 were later dismissed by Rogier Verbeek's investigation into the eruption. The 1883 eruption was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history. At least 36,417 deaths are attributed to the eruption and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world in the days and weeks after the volcano's eruption.
William R. Taylor was 53 years old when Thomas Edison patents the motion picture camera. Thomas Alva Edison was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.
William R. Taylor was 65 years old when The Wright brothers make their first attempt to fly with the Wright Flyer at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The Wright brothers, Orville and Wilbur, were two American aviators, engineers, inventors, and aviation pioneers who are generally credited with inventing, building, and flying the world's first successful airplane. They made the first controlled, sustained flight of a powered, heavier-than-air aircraft on December 17, 1903, four miles south of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. In 1904–05 the brothers developed their flying machine into the first practical fixed-wing aircraft. Although not the first to build experimental aircraft, the Wright brothers were the first to invent aircraft controls that made fixed-wing powered flight possible.
William R. Taylor died on 24 Mar 1912 at the age of 73
BillionGraves.com
Grave record for William R. Taylor (12 Feb 1839 - 24 Mar 1912), BillionGraves Record 3764656 Loa, Wayne, Utah, United States

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